LET’S GET IT ON!

If anyone had any doubt that Senator Barack Obama would take the fight to John McCain, that doubt was obliterated by Obama’s nomination acceptance speech that concluded the Democratic Convention in Denver, Colorado this week.

Barack managed to stay low to the ground, throwing bombs on the McCain campaign and then soared high with the lofty rhetoric we have come to expect from him. He served two masters with this speech. He, point by point, laid out his plan for this country and shot down the often ridiculous claims of his Republican opponent. At the same time, he delivered another inspiring message of hope and optimism.

First, the anti-McCain-ballistic missiles:

It’s not because John McCain doesn’t care. It’s because John McCain doesn’t get it.

And then later, he lays to rest McCain’s most recent preposterous “celebrity attack”.

Because in the faces of those young veterans who come back from Iraq and Afghanistan, I see my grandfather, who signed up after Pearl Harbor, marched in Patton’s Army, and was rewarded by a grateful nation with the chance to go to college on the GI Bill.

In the face of that young student who sleeps just three hours before working the night shift, I think about my mom, who raised my sister and me on her own while she worked and earned her degree; who once turned to food stamps but was still able to send us to the best schools in the country with the help of student loans and scholarships.

When I listen to another worker tell me that his factory has shut down, I remember all those men and women on the South Side of Chicago who I stood by and fought for two decades ago after the local steel plant closed.

And when I hear a woman talk about the difficulties of starting her own business, I think about my grandmother, who worked her way up from the secretarial pool to middle-management, despite years of being passed over for promotions because she was a woman. She’s the one who taught me about hard work. She’s the one who put off buying a new car or a new dress for herself so that I could have a better life. She poured everything she had into me. And although she can no longer travel, I know that she’s watching tonight, and that tonight is her night as well.

I don’t know what kind of lives John McCain thinks that celebrities lead, but this has been mine. These are my heroes. Theirs are the stories that shaped me. And it is on their behalf that I intend to win this election and keep our promise alive as President of the United States.

But then there was the inspiration:

This country of ours has more wealth than any nation, but that’s not what makes us rich. We have the most powerful military on Earth, but that’s not what makes us strong. Our universities and our culture are the envy of the world, but that’s not what keeps the world coming to our shores.

Instead, it is that American spirit – that American promise – that pushes us forward even when the path is uncertain; that binds us together in spite of our differences; that makes us fix our eye not on what is seen, but what is unseen, that better place around the bend.

That promise is our greatest inheritance. It’s a promise I make to my daughters when I tuck them in at night, and a promise that you make to yours – a promise that has led immigrants to cross oceans and pioneers to travel west; a promise that led workers to picket lines, and women to reach for the ballot.

And it is that promise that forty five years ago today, brought Americans from every corner of this land to stand together on a Mall in Washington, before Lincoln’s Memorial, and hear a young preacher from Georgia speak of his dream.

The men and women who gathered there could’ve heard many things. They could’ve heard words of anger and discord. They could’ve been told to succumb to the fear and frustration of so many dreams deferred.

But what the people heard instead – people of every creed and color, from every walk of life – is that in America, our destiny is inextricably linked. That together, our dreams can be one.

“We cannot walk alone,” the preacher cried. “And as we walk, we must make the pledge that we shall always march ahead. We cannot turn back.”

The convention is over and Barack Obama has landed the first substantive punch of the election season. He has said “Enough” not just to the past eight years of devastating Bush/Cheney policy but to the petty foolish politics upon which the McCain campaign has consistently relied.

In plain spoken, non-intellectual, non-elite words, the first African-American candidate from a major political party has declared, Let’s Get it On!

Respectfully,
Rutherford

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