Farewell to T-Paw and Change.org

August 20, 2011 at 2:10 am 585 comments

Where T-Paw Went Wrong

It’s been a week since Tim Pawlenty (known in the Republican hood as T-Paw) withdrew from the GOP Presidential race. There hasn’t been a heck of a lot of real analysis on his withdrawal. Let’s face it. Watching Pawlenty was a lot like watching paint dry. He was hardly a media darling. Still I’m surprised that I haven’t seen a good post-mortem on his campaign.

Maybe I just don’t understand GOP politics but I have the prescription that would still have Pawlenty in the race today. Very simply, target the right demographic. For reasons that totally befuddle me, Pawlenty decided to take on Michele Bachmann and go after her voting block. It doesn’t take a Sigmund Freud to figure out that Pawlenty with his vanilla demeanor was a rival of Mitt Romney, not Michele Bachmann. To put it a bit differently, there are two factions of  GOP candidates this season, the sensible and to varying degrees, the wild-ass crazy. Pawlenty, no matter how much he wanted to be the bad boy you don’t bring home to Mama, was in the sensible league with Romney and Huntsman. Pawlenty should have saved his money, like Mitt did, and waited for the right opportunity. Instead, he blew his entire chest on Iowa and to make matters worse, blew it on the Ames Straw Poll which everyone now knows is NO predictor of future victory.

But then, I’m not really sorry to see Tim go. Tim is, in a word, a punk. Call me old-fashioned but I find something wrong with a candidate who shrinks away from attacking the acknowledged front-runner (Romney) and instead goes full throttle against the only woman in the race. Tim’s lucky he ran out of money because if he hadn’t, he would eventually have had to man-up. I’m not sure T-Paw had the testosterone to run the race to the end.

Why I’m Through with Change.org

For over a year now, I’ve subscribed to e-mails from Change.org. Like a typical liberal, I was moved by the organization’s commitment to social justice. I didn’t keep track but I’m guessing I signed an online petition or two over the past few months. I must admit, as the months wore on, their e-mails didn’t so much move me to social indignation but rather depressed the heck out of me. I also had the sneaking suspicion that some of the folks for whom Change.org advocated didn’t really deserve the advocacy. The proverbial straw that broke the camel’s back came in the form of an article on the makers of “Sesame Street”, The Sesame Workshop (known as the Children’s Television Workshop back when I was a kid).

Apparently the folks at Sesame Workshop had to release a statement saying that they would not have the characters Bert and Ernie get married. Yes, you read that right. Some gang of absolute idiots had petitioned Sesame Workshop to have Bert and Ernie get married. Change.org facilitated the petition. The simple translation of Sesame Workshop’s very polite statement was “for goodness sake, these are PUPPETS! What the hell is wrong with you?”

Now apparently Change.org and the authors of the petition felt that in a time of high suicide rates among gay youngsters, having Bert and Ernie, who have roomed since they came on the scene in 1969, get married would send a message that being gay is ok. It would be in the vein of the “It Gets Better” campaign.

I propose that one way to make “it get better” is stop sexualizing children. I don’t doubt that gender preference is deeply ingrained and very possibly innate. That does not mean that such a preference needs to manifest between the ages of two and four (the demographic of “Sesame Street”). The notion that a four-year old is homosexual, or heterosexual for that matter, is to my mind patently ridiculous. The Sesame Workshop has stated that the friendship between Bert and Ernie teaches kids that very different kinds of people can be friends. That is sufficient in teaching tolerance to kids. If by some wild stretch of the imagination little Johnny says to his Mommy “I want to kiss a boy but I don’t think anyone will like me if I do”, Mommy can always say “people can still like you if you’re different. Look at Bert and Ernie. They’re different. They look different. They like different kinds of things. And they like each other a lot.” This lesson in tolerance can be given without having to tell a four-year old that Bert sticks his pee-pee in Ernie’s bum-bum.

Before everyone accuses me of being a homophobe, let me be perfectly clear. I believe consenting adults can do whatever the heck they want with each other and it’s nobody’s business but theirs. I also believe that two people who love each other, with a sexual component, should be allowed to marry in a civil ceremony if they so please, regardless of gender. However I draw the line at how we introduce children to sexual concepts. The notion of teaching a four-year old that Bert and Ernie are gay (and all that goes along with that) gets me as annoyed as the constant heterosexualization of minors that gets portrayed on the Disney Channel on a regular basis. Our kids should be worried about reading, writing and arithmetic and how to be kind and compassionate to their fellow human beings. They should not have to be worried about what to do with their penises and vaginas. Why can’t we let a four-year old be a four-year old? They’ll have plenty of opportunity to wrestle with sexual urges when they hit puberty.

Sometimes liberals have trouble picking their battles. Now that Change.org has shown such bad judgment in trying to turn a wonderful kid’s show into an episode of Dr. Ruth, they can continue their battles without me.

Respectfully,
Rutherford

WordPress.com Political Blogger Alliance

Entry filed under: Politics, Social commentary, Wordpress Political Blogs. Tags: , , , , , , .

Anger I Can Understand In Defense of Rick Perry, Really

585 Comments Add your own

  • 1. poolman  |  August 20, 2011 at 2:49 am

    Well good for you, Rutherford! That certainly doesn’t sound like change for the better. Screwing with Bert and Ernie?

    AFA as Pawlenty… Meh.

  • 2. pfesser53  |  August 20, 2011 at 7:27 am

    Something I appreciate about you, R, is that – although you believe in an idealogy – you are not married to it. You are married to doing what is right and just.

    I have spent my adult life studying how individuals and nations organize their lives, and I have come to believe that the free-market system best accomplishes the good things both you and I want for our country.

    It certainly won’t happen with the system we have now. Look into any government program now extant. Invariably it started as an attempt to correct some problem through govt intervention – and then caused more problems than it solved. And here’s the crux of the matter: the govt then points to problems IT created and says, “See! You need more govt to correct these problems!”

    And of course the credulous public nods its head and gives them the money and power to do just that.

    A perfect example is medicine. I have the sometimes-unfortunate curse of a near-perfect memory of things forty, fifty years ago, and remember how my older cousins’ medical practices ran. There were very few people with medical insurance and it was a legitimate question whether to buy it if you were a young, healthy family – not a question of, “Can we take the risk of being bankrupted by ONE unlucky illness?”

    Since the govt takeover (called Medicare) prices have risen beyond comprehension as the govt’s willingness to pay for nearly everything distorted the market and drove the development of every expensive test and procedure you could think of. Has it made life better? Yes, unequivocally so. Is it worth it? You tell me. I say not. Life expectancy is definitely more but we are for the most part lengthening the END of life and extending the lives of non-productive geezers. (soon to be me I hope).

    I once again gently challenge you to read Atlas and some of the Libertarian literature. Unfeeling, uncaring? Hardly. I would submit that these are the *only* people who see far enough into the equation to really understand what it takes to make life better. And it ain’t exploiting class envy to facilitate robbing the productive at gunpoint in order to perpetuate a horribly bloated, inefficient bureaucracy – all in the name of “fairness.”

  • 3. Tex Taylor  |  August 20, 2011 at 9:40 am

    Rutherford, you’re actually starting to sound almost sensible. Like I’ve said before – my second favorite liberal. :smile: I once again agree with a post “almost” in its entirety. Pigs fly.

    Been worried about you, even before the move, it seems we read less and less of you. Didn’t know whether you were just very busy, feeling poorly, damned depressed about the state of everything, didn’t have as much internet access, or a combination thereof.

    Let us know how things are going. All of us are interested and the place isn’t the same without your daily input. I would have taken a post just giving us your position in life and how you’re feeling.

    ———

    Like you, I’m sick of children being sexualized and fodder for some activist – liberal or conservative, don’t matter. I read the other day some brain dead fashion designer has come out with lingerie for 4 year olds. I kid you not. Four year old girls, complete with ruby red lipstick and high heels in picture.

    Mothers, not fit to mothers, prancing their young girls up on stage trying to live their pathetic drama queen lives through their daughters. Or indifferent fathers and resident sperm donors. Packs of roaming, unsupervised young men – is there anything more dangerous and more predictable? Seems to be more the norm now.

    Then we sit around like idiots contemplating why we have epidemic child suicide rates, child illness caused by obesity, serial pedophilia, roaming gangs of thugs, rampant illegal drug use, always caching the kids with new and improved programs. We lean more on gov’t, on churches, on social workers, on medicine, on experts and volunteers to try and fix the situation, never identifying the real problem, or at the very least have the guts to say as much.

    We don’t need new programs. We don’t need money, or government intervention. Churches and social workers can’t solve the underlying issues.

    We need one thing.

    Loving, caring parents and extended loving, caring family members acting like adults, letting their children and grandchildren remain innocent for as long as it can last.

  • 4. Tex Taylor  |  August 20, 2011 at 9:50 am

    Tell you something else Rutherford that is destroying this country. I don’t care how many people this one burns either: Feminism and the emasculation of the American male.

    And here is where it leads:

    College Rape Accusations and the Presumption of Male Guilt
    Pressured by the Obama administration, universities abandon any pretense of due process in sexual assault cases.

    http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424053111903596904576516232905230642.html?mod=WSJ_Opinion_LEADTop

    I have two daughters. Rape is one of the most hideous of crimes and society should punish the assault severely. But being that the charges are severe, in my opinion a false claim of rape and the risk it poses toward the accused, should also carry a severe and substantial penalty.

  • 5. fakename2  |  August 20, 2011 at 10:44 am

    R, I was kind of hoping you were kidding about the Bert and Ernie thing, but clearly you weren’t. That said, I speculate that the intent was not to sexualize the children, but to help children come to terms with having same-sex parents. THAT said, I say, Get a life! you people! If that’s your intent, go invent your own puppets!
    As for T-Paw, he was barely a blip on the radar screen. I heard a comment on NPR from one Iowa Republican who attended the debate. With respect to Pawlenty and Bachmann, he said, “They appeared to be battling for who would be the President of Minnesota”.

  • 6. dead rabbit  |  August 20, 2011 at 11:39 am

    The day I sit down with my little guy and turn on Sesame Street only to find Bert sucking Ernie’s dick is the day I say screw it, the Muslims are right, lets have Sharia Law.

  • 7. Hucking Fypocrites  |  August 20, 2011 at 12:20 pm

    The board’s closet woman-hater suddenly thinks its politically punkish to go after a female political opponent in a campaign.

    Classic….

  • 8. Hucking Fypocrites  |  August 20, 2011 at 12:21 pm

    But good to see a new article and hope you are feeling better, Rutherford!

  • 9. Rutherford  |  August 20, 2011 at 2:16 pm

    Oh Huck. You so misjudge me. I love liberal women. :-)

  • 10. Rutherford  |  August 20, 2011 at 2:27 pm

    More seriously, if Pawlenty attacked Romney as vigorously as he attacked Bachmann I wouldn’t have cared. Pawlenty excels at going after guys who are not on the stage with him. I think he went after Bachmann because she’s an easy target and he’s a wimp.

    I like Fakename’s assesment of “President of Minnesota”.

    Although FN I have to disagree with you on the motivation behind the Bert & Ernie petition. From what I’ve read it had nothing to do with gay parents and everything to do with “enhancing” kids self esteem regarding their “sexuality”.

    Rabbit’s comment cracked me up.

  • 11. El Tigre  |  August 20, 2011 at 2:30 pm

    I think Pawlenty’s decision to attack Bachmann was more strategic than you give him credit for. Going directly at Romney at this stage would’ve been premature.

    Pawlenty never had a chance to dethrone Romney in Iowa as the most likely front runner. Not so with Bachman whom Pawlenty had to beat up in the straw poll take the position of “most viable opponent.” It just didn’t work.

    I really don’t think Pawlenty actually believed he would take Romney early in Iowa nor actually sought to achieve it.

    As for Burt and Ernie, good for you. However, I am surprised you caused you to toss your Change.org affiliation with your notions of “social justice” (the very antithesis of mine).

    Something that has always bothered me by the most visible of the gay rights crowd is the inability to advocate without sexualizing. It’s hard to watch a gay rights parade (or similar events) with its overt “in your face” displays of the most deviant aspects of their sexuality, then turn to a serious discussion of family and social acceptance of the unions. T

    Call me old fashioned, but the guy standing on the float wearing a cod piece and dry humping some other dude is not the guy I want having any involvement in deciding what should be portrayed as acceptable behavior to my children.

  • 12. El Tigre  |  August 20, 2011 at 2:34 pm

    “I love liberal women.”

    No you may lust after women, but you clearly fear them. Your over-the-top venom ala Palin is ample proof It’s deeper than political affiliation.

  • 13. El Tigre  |  August 20, 2011 at 2:52 pm

    Tex, others would refer to universities institutionalizing a presumption of male guilt in sexual assault cases as “social justice.”

  • 14. dead rabbit  |  August 20, 2011 at 3:07 pm

    “Call me old fashioned, but the guy standing on the float wearing a cod piece and dry humping some other dude is not the guy I want having any involvement in deciding what should be portrayed as acceptable behavior to my children.”-Tigre

    ha ha…..now that cracked me up.

  • 15. Tex Taylor  |  August 20, 2011 at 4:12 pm

    Tex, others would refer to universities institutionalizing a presumption of male guilt in sexual assault cases as “social justice.”

    True. Very true. It’s driven by bowl haired misandrists and wimpy males seeking the bowl haired misandrists approval, because real women wouldn’t give the wimps a second look. Both were all over the place when I went back to school – they run academia.

    Somewhere between putting women in burkas with eye slits and America’s need to emasculate men by ugly women, which men have only themselves to blame because they could end that in a New York second if they wished, there’s a happy medium.

    I still am naive enough to believe most women worth having would much prefer to have Clinton Eastwood than Phil Donuhue.

    And I agree with Rabbit, Tigre. That was funny. :grin:

  • 16. Tex Taylor  |  August 20, 2011 at 4:21 pm

    O.T. – but I found this a very interesting article.

    And the most important paragraph in the whole deal:

    During the first three months of this year, for every gallon of gasoline and other products we refined and sold in the United States, we earned about 7 cents. Compare that to the 40 to 60 cents per gallon that went from gasoline consumers to the government (state and federal) in gasoline taxes.

    Think about that next Rutherford when you hear liberals talking about “big oil” ripping off consumers and Obama’s tired line of “tax breaks.” That is how dishonest a lot of liberal rhetoric really is.

    http://www.exxonmobilperspectives.com/2011/04/28/exxonmobil-earnings-the-real-story-you-wont-hear-in-washington/

  • 17. Blackiswhite, Imperial Consigliere  |  August 20, 2011 at 4:50 pm

    More seriously, if Pawlenty attacked Romney as vigorously as he attacked Bachmann I wouldn’t have cared.

    He did. More than once. He just wouldn’t do it to his face, which immediately disqualified him. If I can’t trust him to say what he means and mean what he says all the time, then his chances of getting elected are zero.

    Maybe I just don’t understand GOP politics

    You could have stopped there, and said about as much that would have mattered. Your prescriptions for the GOP are about as amusing as Chris Mathews spitting about how the media is going to spend every dime checking into Perry while his conspicously uncurious saliva is still dripping off of Obama’s fly. Maybe he’s just angry about the Secret Service enforcing the restraining order.

    As fgor the rest, I guess I never thought of Bert as the pitcher and Ernie as the catcher, but then, like you, I haven’t really considered it important to sex up the kiddies. I figured junior High School did that enough.

  • 18. Raji  |  August 20, 2011 at 5:12 pm

    Rutherford
    I am truly speechless! Bert and Ernie, sex symbols??

  • 19. poolman  |  August 20, 2011 at 5:59 pm

    http://www.truthdig.com/cartoon/item/it_takes_a_pillage_20110818/

  • 20. dead rabbit  |  August 20, 2011 at 6:42 pm

    Check out some of the scenery from Iceland in this folksy music video.

    Man, I miss the place.

    I’ve spent weeks outside on that tundra. You get to know a place much better when you sleep outside for a week or two. I remember one night the entire sky was moving. Green and red swirls with the random flare being fired.

  • 21. dead rabbit  |  August 20, 2011 at 7:21 pm

    A Icelandic girlfriend I had at the time ended up claiming to have a miscarriage.

    I would get 96 hours off all the time. I would meet her at the bus station and go back to her apartment and pretty much fuck and drink this awful moonshine that tasted like hairspray for four days straight.

    I was such a moron. She never told me she got pregnant, only that she had a miscarriage. She stopped partying and I only saw or once or twice after that.

    At the time it was rumored that the government paid money to for any Icelandic having children. I don’t know if that was true.

    Being the out of control moron I was, I never gave it a second thought until after a few years after the service.

    Now it haunts me a little bit. Do I have a son there? Did she decide just write big goofy American out of the equation?

  • 22. dead rabbit  |  August 20, 2011 at 7:25 pm

    He would be 14 years old now. If he exists.

  • 23. dead rabbit  |  August 20, 2011 at 7:29 pm

    if it is a he

  • 24. poolman  |  August 20, 2011 at 7:33 pm

    Interesting place rabbit, one of many I have not been to.

    Iceland recently used the internet and social networking to write a new constitution.

    Interestingly, it’s American-based technology that is being employed to change Iceland’s government. Which leads one to wonder: would US lawmakers consider such an open approach in the event a change or new amendment to the US Constitution were proposed?

  • 25. dead rabbit  |  August 20, 2011 at 7:46 pm

    Iceland is incomparable to America. It’s so small, the president rides the bus with everyone else.

    I know, I’ve been on the bus. When famous singer Bjork returns home, nobody cares.

    Only some of us Americans were treated as celebrities back then (and disdained by others).

    My point is, they are not diverse. Populist measures like that can work there.

    I was always mistaken for an Icelandic trying to “act” American, which means you get your local “man card” revoked. A few times only my military ID saved me.

    On week days, they are the most quiet and reserved people I have ever seen. It was common to see baby strollers left unattended when I was there.

    But on the weekend….they go nuts…..at least in Reykjavik.

  • 26. dead rabbit  |  August 20, 2011 at 8:01 pm

    Holy shit, he’d be 18 by now, not 14.

  • 27. Rutherford  |  August 20, 2011 at 8:21 pm

    He just wouldn’t do it to his face

    Ehhh, I actually said that if you read the sentence after the one you quoted — Pawlenty excels at going after guys who are not on the stage with him. But thanks for agreeing with me BiW.

    As for my prescription, I stand by it. Tigre says, Pawlenty never had a chance to dethrone Romney in Iowa as the most likely front runner. As I said at the outset, Romney wasn’t the man to beat in Iowa, Bachmann was (well not a man). Romney had the sense not to try to beat Bachmann in the straw poll and Pawlenty should have had similar good sense.

    Now Santorum, that’s a different story. He and Bachmann sing out of the same choir book. He had every reason to believe he could go after Bachmann’s demographic. Pawlenty had no reason to believe he could go after them.

  • 28. Raji  |  August 20, 2011 at 8:27 pm

    My experience is with the Icelandic horses and the people who ride them. A total experience.

  • 29. Rutherford  |  August 20, 2011 at 8:35 pm

    Feminism and the emasculation of the American male.

    Damn …. I SO want to disagree with Tex on this one but I just can’t.

    I struggle with this one because I am a recovering MCP (male chauvinist pig). When I was a kid and into my teens I truly believed a woman’s “place” was in the home. I totally bought the Leave it to Beaver/Donna Reed Show myth of American family life. It was reenforced by my Dad going out to work every day and my Mom staying at home and raising me.

    Society being what it is, I had to undergo serious attitude adjustment in my college and early adult years. Otherwise, successful professional women like my wife and Tex’s wife would knock me into next week.

    But damn, I still can’t help but believe a family unit where the man focuses on bringing in the money and the woman focuses on keeping the house and kids in order just WORKS better. Everyone knows what to expect from everyone else.

    And what has feminism wrought for most women? They now do two jobs for the most part because few guys (or at least not this one) have a hot dinner waiting for their wife when she gets home from a hard day’s work. She’s still doing the bulk of house care and kid care PLUS pursuing a career. The myth that you can have it all is just that, a myth. So something has to suffer and all too often it’s the kids.

    I know in all fairness women have the right to pursue their dreams to the same degree that men do but damn I do think feminism has complicated the American family.

    OK, FN, Muffy and any other ladies who might lurk here … I’m ready for my ass-kicking. :neutral:

  • 30. Rutherford  |  August 20, 2011 at 8:40 pm

    Poolman, contemplate this …. rewriting the Constitution Wikipedia style. Kinda scary. :-)

  • 31. fakename2  |  August 20, 2011 at 9:34 pm

    First, Holy S***! Iceland! Talk about needing your own blog…
    Second, R, re: #10, as I said, I was speculating. Too bad I was wrong, because my interpretation was a lot less despicable.
    Third, R, re: #29. You won’t get any ass-kicking from me :) Your view has great merit and legitimacy. The problem lies in the definition of “feminism”, which is the fault of “feminism” itself. I think because the women of the 50’s and 60’s upon whom the movement was built felt like such victims. Not to diminish that, because being the “victim” of unspoken mores and expectations can be as powerful as being suppressed by laws. But the mistake they made was to dismiss women who weren’t just like them. Eventually they figured that out.
    “Feminism” (and I don’t even use that term) is more about women having choices. It isn’t about female “superiority” or male “oppression”. If your choice is to stay home with the kids, then your choice is a noble one.

  • 32. Tex Taylor  |  August 20, 2011 at 9:40 pm

    I almost sent you a picture of “my girls”, including the Mrs., Rutherford, to show these beauties off, but then I thought the better of it. Somebody may come threatening you looking for me. :smile:

    Understand any women reading this, that I want my daughters to have the same chance as any boy. I want them to have a chance at whatever dreams they pursue. What I don’t want is them to have “more of a chance”, and that is exactly what we have done to young boys the last 30 years. To fix the system, we implemented Title IX, then ended up flipping the script from women getting the short end to men getting the shaft. And it has hurt both men & women.

    Man haters may claim different, but I can’t tell you how many women I meet anymore that pursued a false dream and now regret it – and it is too late.

    If that makes me a chauvinist pig, so be it. But I still believe men and women are different besides the obvious anatomical differences – the perfect complement.

    That’s why I believe gay marriage is a misnomer. It can never offer what a man and woman together can be. If that makes me a homophobe, I’ve been called worse. But I’m right…

  • 33. Tex Taylor  |  August 20, 2011 at 9:45 pm

    Rutherford… :mad:

    You still haven’t let us know why you’ve been absent. If it is something you don’t want to share, I understand.

    Just tell me you are doing okay, before I have to come hunt you down to whip that thick hide of yours. We’re blog family, you know?

  • 34. poolman  |  August 20, 2011 at 10:25 pm

    I am okay with women doing whatever job they want to. I also think there should be equal pay for equal work.

    But as for a family, the ideal is still a working dad and stay-at-home-raising-the-kids-tending-to-the-home mom. If that is chauvinistic, oh well. It seems to provide the best results, statistics bear that out. Unfortunately, society did that scenerio a grave disservice when they displayed it as old fashioned and out-dated and not fair to women.

    With the rise of consumerism, marketing was geared toward getting mom into the workplace so both working adults could increase household income and purchases. The bogus capitalist mantra of more-bigger-newer, is better. Plus marketing stroked our desire to covet, stirring our Darwinian competitiveness by promoting the “keeping up with the Joneses” atmosphere.

    AFA same sex marriage goes, if two folks of the same sex want to shack up and share their lives, no matter how intimate, power to them. But don’t try to offer that as an equal alternative. It NEVER will be. That’s my opinion.

  • 35. El Tigre  |  August 20, 2011 at 11:02 pm

    “Romney had the sense not to try to beat Bachmann in the straw poll and Pawlenty should have had similar good sense.”

    What’s a Pawlenty to do? Obviously he wasn’t going to steal Bachman’s base, but he had to accomplish something in Iowa.

  • 36. Rutherford  |  August 21, 2011 at 12:04 am

    Well again, Tigre, maybe this is where I don’t understand GOP politics. You say he had to accomplish something in Iowa. Why? Romney felt no compulsion to accomplish something in Iowa. Sh*t, Herman Cain (probably financing his own campaign) said he’s in this thing till the end regardless.

    On the one hand, you can be Rudy Giuliani and be an ass and think you can wait until Florida to start winning contests. On the other hand, you can deliberately bypass a meaningless straw poll … and maybe even a close to meaningless caucus in Iowa and still do quite well. So, I say, once again, that Pawlenty, working with limited funds, should have kept his eye on future races, declared Iowa irrelevant from the very start and he’d still be a contender.

    The problem with Pawlenty is a lack of authenticity. The truth is he’s a soft-spoken “nice” guy but from the start he tried to play Bible thumping tough guy and it NEVER rang true. If only I had been his campaign strategist, he’d still be in the race and he might still have a chance. :-)

  • 37. dead rabbit  |  August 21, 2011 at 12:05 am

    Can someone tell Palin to go take hike. I see “Bristol” got a tattoo to kick off her reality TV show.

    What?

    Nobody cares?

    By the way Rutherford, Bristol is fair game. Have at it. I mean, as long as you don’t blame her for shootings several states away.

  • 38. dead rabbit  |  August 21, 2011 at 12:09 am

    I’m not thrilled with any of these Republicans.

    Chris Christie, I beg you man. Run.

  • 39. Rutherford  |  August 21, 2011 at 12:17 am

    Tex, thanks for asking about how things are going. Honestly, from a posting perspective I’m not too far off my usual game … I average one article per week.

    As for comments, yeah you’re right, I haven’t been around much. I’m still incredibly discombobulated in this new apartment and my time management which was never very good to start with has gone totally to hell. The kid starts school on Monday and that will add much needed structure to both my life and that of the Mrs. I do still read most of the comments on my iPhone at various times of the day and you guys continue to entertain the hell out of me. :lol:

    Health-wise, I’m probably going to start all over again with a new gastro guy here in Naperville. I honestly think my supposed lactose intolerance was a false positive … in fact I’m so twisted in my thinking lately that I think the first gastro guy just gave me that diagnosis to get rid of me because he didn’t want to be bothered getting to the bottom (pardon the pun) of the problem. I still take the Lactaid with anything that might have even the slightest bit of dairy but I’ve still got problems. Overall I’d say I’m better than I was in CT but not normal by any stretch. If I were a betting man, I’d say I have IBS.

    “Trixie” and I have also been dealing with major bouts of homesickness. But that is getting better with each unpacked box.

    This update probably belongs in the Coliseum but f*ck it. :-)

  • 40. Rutherford  |  August 21, 2011 at 12:28 am

    LOL Rabbit, I know you’re no big fan of Jon Stewart but he really nailed the flash in the pan nature of GOP “leader” hysteria this week. Bachmann had barely won the straw poll before she was next-to-forgotten in favor of Rick Perry. Then Perry says Bernanke (or maybe it was Geithner) is guilty of treason and he implies he’d get an ass-whuppin’ down in Texas, and the grown up GOP operatives like Karl Rove start to get nervous. (Yes I’m aware that Rove is a Bushie and the Bushes don’t much like Perry.)

    So now with Perry hysteria already waning, what do we hear? Calls for Paul Ryan, Chris Christie or Jeb Bush to get in the race.

    I have to tell you, while I would absolutely love to see Christie get in (I can’t help but like the guy) I would be annoyed because I believed him when he said he wouldn’t get in, no way, no how. If he gets in, it tells me he’s just another sly pol whose word means nothing. :mad:

    I’d also like to see Paul Ryan or Jeb Bush. Ryan seems a smart guy and not an old fart. Bush was the brother who shoulda been President. A terrible miscarriage of justice within the Bush dynasty.

  • 41. Rutherford  |  August 21, 2011 at 12:31 am

    I have an open-ended question for Rabbit or anyone else who would care to weigh in.

    If Sarah Palin does not run for President, will she be dismissed by her GOP peers and essentially fade from view, or at the other extreme will she be a king-maker?

    I’m going to bed. I’ll look for your answers in the morning.

  • 42. dead rabbit  |  August 21, 2011 at 12:34 am

    “If he gets in, it tells me he’s just another sly pol whose word means nothing. “-R

    Yeah, I hear you. I hate when they do that shit.

    Christie told the right to fuck off the other week. I guess he nominated a Muslim for judge, and some on the right were pissed about it.

    Apparently he knew the guy for a long time. He told them to go take a hike. I respect that.

  • 43. dead rabbit  |  August 21, 2011 at 12:35 am

    I see Palin eventually becoming a pop icon and nothing more. Over time, her words will hold much less weight in the political forum.

  • 44. pfesser53  |  August 21, 2011 at 6:57 am

    Palin is done. Stick a fork in her. She’s a little pouty because nobody pays any attention to her now, but she has her money, doesn’t have to live with Tod the Cod in that cold-assed place any more and can just chill out.

    Life is good – for everybody.

    Now on to Perry.

  • 45. El Tigre  |  August 21, 2011 at 9:10 am

    Q: “You say he had to accomplish something in Iowa. Why?”

    A: $$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$

    You had to ask?

  • 46. El Tigre  |  August 21, 2011 at 9:37 am

    I hate to agree with PF, but Palin’s 15 minutes are up.

    Well, unless you guys on the left continue with your usual strategy of calling attention to the caricature you’ve created, identify it as the spokesperson/proxy for the right, then attack it. Then we’ll have to hear of Bristol’s tattoos, Levi’s crack addicted momma, and whatever else might appeal to a tabloid-level mentality.

    Frankly, the reason for Palin’s longevity is that your messiah turned out to be a loser. Now that the media is willing to acknowledge it to some extent, Palin will fade. She is a foil, the yin to Obama’s yang, the Cher to Obama’s Sonny. . .

  • 47. Alfie  |  August 21, 2011 at 11:27 am

    Rutherford I don’t know what the testing entails but my better half had a colleague who had endure the allergy/intolerance thing for years only to have a new physician tell her…”No you have Crohn’s,do this” and she experienced an uptick in quality of life soon after.

  • 48. Alfie  |  August 21, 2011 at 11:29 am

    I think Palin has cemented herself in the entertainment sector of politics and that that area really will only find her continued support as long as lefties,not righties, want her around.
    In support of that I’d point to the recent Piers Morgan v O’Donnelll thing.

  • 49. poolman  |  August 21, 2011 at 11:35 am

    I don’t know. Murdoch and company have invested an awful lot of money in Palin. I’m certain he holds much sway in what she says and does. Knowing his MO, he’s got a lot of dirt on her to keep her in check, the same way the current investigations prove he has controlled countless others in countries throughout the globe.

    As a candidate for political office she has no chance, but I expect her to be used to the point of insignificance. I expect to see the kids tow the line, too.

    After all, the family that preys together, stays together. :wink:

  • 50. fakename2  |  August 21, 2011 at 11:57 am

    I agree that Palin’s 15 minutes are over, AND that it’s “the left” that has kept her alive this long. “We” need to move on (so to speak). It isn’t like there’s a shortage of Republicans to make fun of. All I can say is, Happy Birthday, Elvis!

  • 51. poolman  |  August 21, 2011 at 12:03 pm

    Talk about corruption from the top on down… the old fox in the hen house…criminals manning the jailhouse…etc.

    Here’s to the government many of you so vehemently defend…

    http://current.com/shows/countdown/videos/exclusive-matt-taibbi-on-sec-covering-up-wall-street-crimes

    Kudos to your man KO, Rutherford. He seems somewhat less arrogant anymore.

  • 52. Tex Taylor  |  August 21, 2011 at 12:09 pm

    Palin was done a year ago if you Lefties had left well enough alone. And I’m with the rest – Bristol Palin is free game. Have at it.

    Bachmann is not Palin, as I do think she’s a little smarter, but not much smarter – the Elvis thing made me feel like I was back with McCain as candidate. I held my hands over my eyes and peeked. If I hear one more time about titanium spine, I’m going to put a gun to my head.

    I do think Rick Perry is the real deal and we’ll see how that goes. I’ve heard him speak, and he is very good on the stump. I consider him the front runner by a long shot, and look forward to doing battle with Pfesser’s militant atheism.

    But if Paul Ryan or Chris Christie get in, I’ll take a look. My candidate Marco isn’t running – but I still predict he will be President one day, and I personally believe my own Senator Tom Coburn would make a better candidate than anybody running currently.

  • 53. Raji  |  August 21, 2011 at 12:11 pm

    “But damn, I still can’t help but believe a family unit where the man focuses on bringing in the money and the woman focuses on keeping the house and kids in order just WORKS better. Everyone knows what to expect from everyone else.”- Rutherford

    No ass-kicking from this quarter if both parties are in agreement. I think the key word here is Expectations. Parents today need to make a commitment to the act of parenting. The days of the man working a 9-5 job, coming home to his newspaper/TV and cocktail while he waits for his dinner no longer exists. The stay at home spouse (yes, Dad’s can fulfill that role) cannot be expected to work 24/7.

    You are correct that it is too often the kids that suffer from two parents working unless they have committed their time away from careers to parenting but this often is not the case. Couples who get a puppy, put it into the crate all day, wonder why it isn’t housebroken and has too much energy at the end of the day. Same scenario as children.

    Feminism did complicate the American family but I blame a lot on the female. Too many females said they could do it all, have a career, have a family and still keep up the bulk of house care. We are Wonder Woman! Guess what happened?

    Today is National Topless Day. Women in Asheville NC are having a rally to protest the fact that men can go topless and women can’t. You want to know the humor in this? The police said NC indecent exposure law only pertains to the lower half of the body and the women can march topless all they want. Feminism at it’s best?

    Re: Comment #41. We can pray can’t we?

  • 54. dead rabbit  |  August 21, 2011 at 12:25 pm

    National Topless Day is a great idea. However, I suspect it will also be hairy female armpit day, too

    Nonetheless, I expect hundreds of male onlookers watching the parade conspicuously wearing rain coats.

  • 55. Alfie  |  August 21, 2011 at 12:29 pm

    Tex it has been reported that Rubio is on the Romney short list for VP,what are your feelings on that?

  • 56. Tex Taylor  |  August 21, 2011 at 12:31 pm

    However, I suspect it will also be hairy female armpit day, too

    :lol: Bingo. Answer of the day.

    I’m probably the only straight male in America that believes this, but breasts are most sensual partially exposed. I always thought cleavage was sexier than bare hanging boobs – unless they are really perky.

  • 57. fakename2  |  August 21, 2011 at 12:32 pm

    I suspect a lot more women with children work than would like to, out of necessity–not because they’ve been brainwashed by the military/industrial complex or because they want a later model Mercedes. Having a child is expensive. And it’s a sacrifice, one way or the other, whether you work or not.
    Raji, I don’t think you’re being entirely fair, and you contradict yourself. There were plenty of men who said, fine, you can work, but I expect you to still do everything when you’re home. So yes, it’s an equal partnership and has to be.

  • 58. Tex Taylor  |  August 21, 2011 at 12:35 pm

    Alfie,

    I made mention of Crohn’s disease to Rutherford some months back, as it seemed his symptoms very similar to patients I knew who had it diagnosed. I could be wrong, but I swear it was one of the first things tested and ruled out.

    Rutherford,

    Have they also tested you for diverticulitis?

  • 59. Tex Taylor  |  August 21, 2011 at 12:39 pm

    Fake,

    We’ve all been suckered into double incomes and changed our lives accordingly.

    Originally, it might have been intended to offer women more opportunity, but I think a large part of the problem in America now is that many have became dependent upon two combined incomes due to higher taxes, stagnant wages, and more upscale living styles becoming the norm.

    And when either loses one income, things fall apart quickly. So instead of minimizing their risk, they’ve actually doubled it by becoming accustomed to two necessary incomes.

  • 60. Tex Taylor  |  August 21, 2011 at 12:42 pm

    Tex it has been reported that Rubio is on the Romney short list for VP,what are your feelings on that?

    I think they should switch the ticket. :smile:

    I’m not anti-Mitt. He’s a capable businessman and probably would do well concerning the economy. But that is only one-half of the bad equation.

    The other is government is simply too big and needs to be dramatically cut. And Mitt seems to be a big government proponent.

  • 61. Hucking Fypocrites  |  August 21, 2011 at 1:01 pm

    I think Obama’s kids should be fair game now, too.

    After all…if the country is going to be scolded like children while Obama teaches us lessons he claims even his kids know, then we should be able to attack just how well they do know those lessons.

    Why can’t we see if Sasha and Malia actually do turn in their homework on time?

    If Obama doesn’t want his family to be fair game then he needs to stop putting them into the game in his speeches and by highlighting their t-shirt politics.

  • 62. El Tigre  |  August 21, 2011 at 1:05 pm

    I disagree, Huck. The dignity of the office, not the man, demands more in terms of boundaries (notwithstanding the left’s efforts to diminish the office wherever possible).

  • 63. Hucking Fypocrites  |  August 21, 2011 at 1:19 pm

    I agree. But he is the one that keeps putting them in bounds.

  • 64. Hucking Fypocrites  |  August 21, 2011 at 1:30 pm

    And he has long known it is something he should not do.

  • 65. Hucking Fypocrites  |  August 21, 2011 at 1:34 pm

    Must be why he encourages them to do it, themselves.

    “In a public letter to Malia and her younger sister Sasha last year, the US commander-in-chief expressed his hopes that his daughters would continue the family tradition of campaigning. ‘It is only when you hitch your wagon to something larger than yourself that you will realise your true potential,’ he wrote.”

  • 66. Tex Taylor  |  August 21, 2011 at 1:39 pm

    Never believed a man’s kids should be punished on account of the sins and shortcomings of the man. Obama is a miserable failure and joke as a President. He deserves to be impeached for gross incompetency in my book, as he is so incompetent, he is killing this country and is dangerous. Still doesn’t mean he is a bad father, nor our his children responsible to serving the country.

    To me, Obama’s kids are off limits, just as Trig Palin should have been off limits. Bristol Palin is an adult, and after embarrassing herself trying to capitalize on her momma’s fame, has now made herself fair game to be ripped. Frankly, I would find her an embarrassment as a parent, not because of her out of wedlock birth, but the fact she used it get herself noticed. I was mortified when I learned she was paid for the unwed mother commercial, which was a great message and served a useful purpose – until I discovered the process. :oops: That’s a disgrace.

    I was willing to give Bristol the Dancing with Stars routine because she had been so unfairly brutalized by our corrupt media. After that, she should have disappeared and gone back to ignominious life. But like her momma, the taste of notoriety went to her head. I will no longer defend Bristol’s immaturity, ignorance and self-absorption, and frankly am irritated I even bothered to defend her to begin with. She didn’t deserve it.

  • 67. Hucking Fypocrites  |  August 21, 2011 at 1:47 pm

    So if I shouldn’t hold Perry’s evangelic beliefs against him, how about his hypocrisy?

    “Between December 2007 and last June, private-sector employment in Texas declined by 0.6 percent while public-sector jobs increased by 6.4 percent, according to the federal Bureau of Labor Statistics. Overall, government employees account for about one-sixth of the workforce in Texas.”

    This MOFO is nothing but a smooth-talking liar telling people what they want to hear while doing something else. We’ve already got 1 of those leading us.

    It’s not enough to beat Obama. We need bullshit-free leadership and that doesn’t seem to be something Rick Perry will provide.

    We need to find someone else.

  • 68. Hucking Fypocrites  |  August 21, 2011 at 1:50 pm

    Especially when I also know that much of that private sector growth is luring companies from 1 state to his. That isn’t job creation. It’s job transfer. It works well when we are talking about interstate transfer, but it won’t work on an international level.

  • 69. Tex Taylor  |  August 21, 2011 at 2:00 pm

    Huck, I don’t believe that Washington Post article. Though I can’t speak for the whole state, Texas three largest cities, Houston, Dallas, and San Antonio all have added multitudes of private sector jobs since 2009, including hydrocarbon, tech, and heavy industry, including the ports – much of it at the expense of your home state.

    I wouldn’t quote that as fact, as I am guessing that article will need to be retracted like the so called education gap was retracted (quietly) some weeks back in the NY Times.

    Trust me – Texas is growing the private sector. It should be obvious from the immigration from emigration rates.

    Hopefully, you won’t let your bigotry blind you to the sources you have been using. I know you disdain Evangelical Christianity, but some of America’s best and brightest are Evangelical Christians, including Pfesser’s own governor. :wink:

    Or have you forgotten the lies told about George Bush in 1999? I would think a cynic like you, correctly cynical I might add, would wait for verification other than quoting a notoriously unreliable paper like the Washington Post.

    I’d be willing to place a gentleman’s bet on the accuracy of that article.

  • 70. poolman  |  August 21, 2011 at 2:06 pm

    Perry is as corrupt as they come. The difference is so far he has been able to cover his tracks and present a faux moral public image. The good ole boy network has always been alive and well, especially in Texas. Since he has gained national recognition and is in the presidential race, we may yet uncover some of those skeletons in his closet.

    http://www.nytimes.com/2011/08/21/us/politics/21donate.html

    I still say Ron Paul is the best chance we have in setting things aright. But with no media support and being shunned by the GOP, there is little chance of him having real success.

    If we can derail the primary propaganda producers soon enough, we may actually be able to return our collective focus to matters of importance.

    http://www.reuters.com/article/2011/08/19/us-murdoch-emails-police-idUSTRE77I58B20110819

    Unfortunately the American public is accustomed to entertainment and having others do the digging for them.

  • 71. Tex Taylor  |  August 21, 2011 at 2:15 pm

    It works well when we are talking about interstate transfer, but it won’t work on an international level.

    That’s a ruse. We’re in a contracting economy and government doesn’t create jobs. You’re going to have to get past this jobs, jobs, jobs baloney of Obama, because that is not how free enterprise works.

    Obama couldn’t create a job if he wanted to because he doesn’t create wealth. Dammit people – get over this facade of government “creating jobs”. That is exactly our largest economic problem – government needs to get out of the business of “creating jobs.” They are doing exactly what they shouldn’t be doing, and that is preventing a real recovery.

    You create jobs, or in our case the transfer of jobs, by government creating the most favorable environment for private business to prosper. That’s how you create jobs.

    It should be obvious that Virginia and Texas have done that better than anybody else and have been for several years.

    How do you knock that message Huck? Isn’t that what you want?

    For federal government to return to the smallest common denominator and get back to its original purpose? Defense, interstate commerce, and the like?

    And I meant to link this earlier to demonstrate with humor just how pathetic these NYT and WAPO articles are. Most are complete bullshit.

    http://iowahawk.typepad.com/iowahawk/2011/03/longhorns-17-badgers-1.html

  • 72. Tex Taylor  |  August 21, 2011 at 2:25 pm

    Poolman,

    Tell me Obama voter, Planned Parenthood proponent, Lyndon LaRouche quoter, and resident Troofer? What lends you any credence at determining who is competent and corrupt?

    Perry is as corrupt as they come.

    So the State of Texas and its citizens are so stupid, they voted for corruption three times?

    I’ve heard of class envy. I didn’t know we had state envy too. I’m beginning to feel we deserve Obama for another four years. If a majority of the citizenry is still looking to government to bail us out, might as well be a liberal when the card house crumbles.

    I give us 24 months.

  • 73. Hucking Fypocrites  |  August 21, 2011 at 2:28 pm

    “Huck, I don’t believe that Washington Post article.”

    What’s to believe? This isn’t an opinion piece. Those numbers are supposedly from the Bureau of Labor Statistics. You are free to scour the site and prove WaPo wrong.

    “You’re going to have to get past this jobs, jobs, jobs baloney of Obama, because that is not how free enterprise works.”

    What are you talking about?

    I am not claiming government does or doesn’t create jobs. This discussion isn’t about me, so don’t try and make it so.

    I am claiming that Rick Perry tells us that government doesn’t and shouldn’t create jobs while official government data shows government job creation in Texas outweighs private sector job creation by….alot.

    When someone is ready to talk about that, I’ll be here.

  • 74. El Tigre  |  August 21, 2011 at 2:32 pm

    Iowahawk blew that one out of the water.

  • 75. Hucking Fypocrites  |  August 21, 2011 at 2:32 pm

    “You create jobs, or in our case the transfer of jobs, by government creating the most favorable environment for private business to prosper. That’s how you create jobs.”

    Like I said, that works on an interstate level

    Can you give us a list of countries you think will transfer existing jobs here? Because that is all Texas has done. It has not created new private sector jobs. It has made an environment for existing jobs to be moved to Texas.

  • 76. Hucking Fypocrites  |  August 21, 2011 at 2:33 pm

    Tiger, can you link? I’d like to read that.

  • 77. Hucking Fypocrites  |  August 21, 2011 at 2:35 pm

    Nevermind I see that is Tex’s link. I’ll read it after breakfast and would genuinely enjoy being proven wrong on this.

  • 78. Hucking Fypocrites  |  August 21, 2011 at 2:37 pm

    OK, it must be a different article because the word “jobs” does not appear in the one Tex linked.

  • 79. poolman  |  August 21, 2011 at 2:49 pm

    The USA converted, in practice, from a republic to a democracy during the reign of FDR. Without a miraculous change of course, our democracy’s brief life is almost over and its violent death is imminent.

    http://www.veteranstoday.com/2011/08/21/democracys-violent-death/

    The 16th Amendment (income tax), the establishment of The Federal Reserve and the 17th Amendment neutered the States and released the D.C. Leviathan to grow out of control. Until The Fed and these Amendments are addressed, suggests Thomas DiLorenzo, we are stuck in a situation best described as “Constitutional Futility.”

  • 80. Hucking Fypocrites  |  August 21, 2011 at 2:51 pm

    When I said “…government job creation…” above it should have been “government-sector job creation”

  • 81. fakename2  |  August 21, 2011 at 3:05 pm

    Speaking of bullshit-free–that’s very hard to find. Rick Perry loudly rejected $555 million from the federal government to extend unemployment benefits, and quietly accepted almost $17 billion in stimulus funds which Texas used to balance its budget.

    http://www.cbsnews.com/8301-503544_162-5166310-503544.html

    If you don’t like CBS News as a source, the same info can be found in plenty of other places, such as the WSJ.

  • 82. poolman  |  August 21, 2011 at 3:39 pm

    http://www.rollingstone.com/politics/blogs/national-affairs/rick-perry-and-the-environment-three-things-you-need-to-know-20110817

    Ironically, Perry’s biggest political problem when it comes to talking about energy may be convincing Republican primary voters that he’s a[s] backward-looking as he presents himself to be. After all, in 1988, when Al Gore was talking about the dangers of global warming and the need for a clean-energy revolution and ramping up his run for President, Perry was his Texas campaign manager (Perry was a Democrat for the first six years of his political life, then switched parties in 1990). Perry now claims he didn’t agree with Gore on these issues, and has gone out of his way to distance himself from Gore. “I certainly got religion,” Perry said in 2007, using the language of a born-again hack for Big Oil, “I think he’s gone to hell.”

  • 83. Tex Taylor  |  August 21, 2011 at 4:13 pm

    Since Huck insists on being a accusatory and continual religious bigot, I will provide the proof, not from 2008, but from the entire two and one-half terms of Rick Perry’s governorship that indeed Texas has created far and away the highest number of PRIVATE SECTOR JOBS IN THE NATION:

    Texas adds 732,800 jobs in 10 years; no other state tops 100,000

    The inventory of private-sector jobs in Texas increased by 732,800 between April 2001 and April 2011, according to an On Numbers analysis of new federal employment data.

    No other state registered an increase of more than 100,000 private-sector jobs during the decade. Only 19 states and the District of Columbia posted any gains at all. Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.

    http://www.bizjournals.com/bizjournals/on-numbers/scott-thomas/2011/05/texas-adds-732800-jobs-in-10-years.html

    California, your state Huck that you CHOOSE to live in, is last. Dead last. That is what you get with Dimocratic, Lib leadership. I must figure if it doesn’t bother you to live there, then you must be welcome party to failure.

  • 84. Tex Taylor  |  August 21, 2011 at 4:20 pm

    I love Poolman’s verifiability. Veteran’s Today and Rolling Stone magazine. :smile:

    The link Huck about the so-called Texas education system gap in comparison to those great bastions of liberal brilliance was to simply demonstrate you shouldn’t be naive enough to believe everything you read – especially from the Washington Post and New York Times.

    I’m afraid with respect to Christianity, you are…in that way with preconceived bias and little knowledge about the subject really driving your beef, you’re very much like Poolman.

  • 85. poolman  |  August 21, 2011 at 4:34 pm

    As I’ve said before, truth is still truth, no matter where you find it or how it’s packaged. The same can be said for bullshit.

    So if you disagree with the content of the articles, we can discuss that. If you’re just going to attempt to humiliate the messenger, well… I guess that is what you are best at. :wink:

    Grandma always told me in whatever you do, do the best damn job you can. If you’re a street sweeper, be the best damn street sweeper that ever was.

  • 86. Tex Taylor  |  August 21, 2011 at 4:43 pm

    Why would I attempt to humiliate the messenger? You do a find job of that yourself. Humiliate doesn’t do justice. Make a daily ass of yourself more like it.

    Let’s assume everything in there is true. The entire content of that article is from the late 80s. At one time, Ronald Reagan and my wife were Dimocrats. I love them both – and both changed.

    It’s actually incredible for me to believe Huck isn’t picking up on what is going on. He’s the biggest critic on the board of what happened in 2008 and media corruption of the big, slobbering lovefest – same deal here. I understand you not picking it up because frankly, your diagnosis is simple Poolman. You’re stupid. Huck is not.

    What did I just say not two weeks ago? Obama can not run on a record – everything is a disaster. All the articles you guys have picked are rabid lib sources. The only way for Obama to win is the path of personal destruction. This will go on for the next 15 months. So who is the frontrunner currently in the Republican party? Rick Perry? If Romney should pull ahead tomorrow, he will be the target.

    I don’t care who you vote for – and long as it’s the Republican candidate. You vote for Obama again, you obviously hate America, because it will crumble if he is elected for another 4 years. The last four weeks should have been a wake up call for everyone.

  • 87. poolman  |  August 21, 2011 at 4:58 pm

    I think if a vote was cast in the blogosphere regarding who was the biggest ass, your moniker would certainly compete for top dog.

    Just because your turncoat choice happens to be the frontrunner, doesn’t change history or facts, no matter who reports them. I have said often political affiliation doesn’t matter. Just like sports, players change teams and allegiances from one season to the next. It’s a game and provides entertainment for a dumbed-down populace.

    I’ve also stated repeatedly that Ron Paul is my candidate of choice. He’ll be getting my vote, unless something major changes between now and then. So save your lib slurs for someone else. They just don’t apply here.

  • 88. Rutherford  |  August 21, 2011 at 5:25 pm

    Senator Tom Coburn would make a better candidate than anybody running currently.

    Tex, that’s the home team mentality taking over. I liked Coburn too until he decided to go for the racist vote and make a dumbass statement about Obama liking social programs because as a black man he was the beneficiary of them.

    Besides that, I’m always suspicious of ex-medical doctors who go into politics. I always suspect they were lousy doctors and that’s why they’re no longer practicing. And yes, it goes for Howard Dean as much as it goes for Ron Paul and Tom Coburn.

  • 89. Tex Taylor  |  August 21, 2011 at 6:31 pm

    I think if a vote was cast in the blogosphere regarding who was the biggest ass, your moniker would certainly compete for top dog.

    Maybe. But if we were to cast a vote in the “blogosphere” about the most stupid, you and some of your Chatty Kitchen friends would be right there with me, Mr. Gossip. :wink:

    Ron Paul won’t even be the candidate dip. So save your excuses for Fat Grannies.

  • 90. Tex Taylor  |  August 21, 2011 at 6:36 pm

    Besides that, I’m always suspicious of ex-medical doctors who go into politics. I always suspect they were lousy doctors and that’s why they’re no longer practicing.

    That may hold for Howard Dean, but Dr. Tom was actually quite popular, and in fact still deliveries many babies without charge when home. Big article here about his generosity. Got to remember, he won a vote in an overwhelmingly Dimocratic portion of OK – I believe he was the first Republican in 60/70 years from District 2. I’ve met him and he’s a very nice man.

    Don’t know if Coburn is a racist or maybe I’m just being a homer, but I’ll second his comment about Obama – it is indisputable that Obama dearly loves them (social programs) to buy the vote. :grin:

  • 91. Rutherford  |  August 21, 2011 at 6:48 pm

    it is indisputable that Obama dearly loves them (social programs) to buy the vote.

    Even I would not hold that sentiment against Coburn as that is the standard accusation against all liberals. He should have said that. Perhaps he meant to say that? Unfortunately he threw Obama’s own race into the equation.

    As I said, my overall impression of Coburn has been a positive one. I particularly liked his contribution during the televised meeting Obama had with Reps and Senators a couple of years ago. He was one of the few intelligent men in the room offering positive solutions.

    Even Chris “Tingles” Matthews when he reported on Coburn’s statement expressed surprise at it, since even he was a fan.

  • 92. Alfie  |  August 21, 2011 at 6:59 pm

    Huck I think either Romney or Perry have illustrated how some international job transfer could occur.
    Now you just need to get off the creation transfer wagon. Sadly developed economies have very close to a zero point in employment ergo transfer is a reality we need to embrace. Outsourcing in reverse.

  • 93. fakename2  |  August 21, 2011 at 7:24 pm

    I understand the attraction to Ron Paul, but you have to accept his good ideas along with the whacked ones. Plus, like it or not, this is a two-party system. You have to pick. If you want to vote for Ron Paul to “make a statement”, please go ahead. It will be like voting for Ralph Nader.
    And speaking of Nader, does anyone feel Romney fatigue? Among the current field, granted he is the most reasonable, but I can’t help but feel he is a has-been. Always the bridesmaid…If he ends up with the nomination, I can’t help but think that Republicans will be left with the same choice they had with McCain. Not very excited, but feeling like they have no choice.

  • 94. Alfie  |  August 21, 2011 at 7:31 pm

    I perused the WaPo and various other links to stories for and against Perry and Texas.
    Bottomline there is some definite play with numbers and half truths here.
    Texas public sector job growth does not appear to be the primary job growth,more importantly source of income for Texan residents. In fact Texas public sector job growth seems and has been reported by the WaPo,Economist and many others as being in line with what one would assume given population growth.
    In the very WaPo article that is fueling the pre-ejaculation elation of all the leftards there seems to be said as much with the bonus that many are cringing at the coming state budget cuts that will be axing said public sector employees.
    One can chat about whether the Texas jobs are “good” jobs. Sadly those that will pretend to have the most dog in that fight are exactly those Americans who have helped fuck America up to the point we’re at now.
    Parents have been indoctrinated into believing their kids MUST go to college. This of course has proven to be a dismal failure. College tuition has skyrocketed while at the same time,(lets be mad crazy arbitrary here make a flying assumption laden guess) at least 50% of diplomas in circulation are worth about as much as the brown streaked Charmin I just spun down the commode.
    Americans have been told certain jobs are beneath them. That their grandparents did them is nothing. You should expect better. WHY?????
    The thinking that some jobs are beneath us is crazy,especially for a nation that has bought totally into being a predominantly service sector economy. If these fucking jobs are beneath us then why did we launch our economy in that direction????
    Bottomline companies and jobs have gone to Texas for all the reasons govt can give. There is no way in the final analysis private sector jobs are outnumbered by public sector ones.
    People can believe whatever they want to see in an article or statistic. Reality sets in after the petit morte though and that is what we all must face.
    Alfie

  • 95. Alfie  |  August 21, 2011 at 7:33 pm

    Fake I can’t share your opinion of Romney and I don’t think it is just because I like him.
    He is currently running an excellent campaign and the Perry factor is actually a great thing for Mitt.

  • 96. fakename2  |  August 21, 2011 at 8:11 pm

    Thanks for that response, Alfie. I’m not following Romney’s campaign, so I can’t speak to its excellence. I can see how Perry would be a boon, though. It’s the comparison.
    It seems to me though that Romney has the same problem as Perry. Perry has to weasel out of having taken $17 billion in stimulus funds while dismissing the stimulus as a failure. Romney has to attack the health care act in the face of “Romneycare”.
    I think as governors they both did the right thing for their states and their people. But they shouldn’t try to unwrite history. Just my take on it, but I think they’d both be better off to defend their past actions, rather than trying to distance themselves from them. They could say, here’s why I did what I did and why it was a good idea at the time. And here’s how it’s different from the Obama administration’s agenda. They count on people having short memories, and on slogans, emotionalism, and outrage.

  • 97. Alfie  |  August 21, 2011 at 8:18 pm

    I think as governors they both did the right thing for their states and their people.
    I think you grab the gold nugget of truth with that and both of them have all ready initiated the right spin on it.
    States rights and one size does NOT fit all.
    I’ve not followed Perry other than pretty recently;however, I can tell you Romney has a lot of experience with how people view him and what they do with that.His Senate and governor races have taught him a boatload and I think he’s learned.

  • 98. Hucking Fypocrites  |  August 21, 2011 at 8:38 pm

    Its sad how willing people are to ignore facts for the sake of getting 1 of their own into a position of power. Blacks did it with Obama and it is quickly becoming evident that evangelists will do it with Perry.

    “California, your state Huck that you CHOOSE to live in, is last. Dead last.”

    I am well aware of that, Tex. And do you know where a good many of those EXISTING jobs have moved to?…Texas. Which was my point in the first place.

    You have not done a thing to prove that Texas creates new jobs that did not exist in this world already. You have done nothing to prove that in the last 2 years Texas has grown its government at a much greater rate than it has grown the private sector, which was also my point in the first place.

    “The link Huck about the so-called Texas education system gap in comparison to those great bastions of liberal brilliance was to simply demonstrate you shouldn’t be naive enough to believe everything you read”

    Let me know when you come across a link that fact checks what I am talking about. I assume Team Perry is working to blow these MSM lies out of the water.

    “Now you just need to get off the creation transfer wagon.”

    Yeah I’ll be sure and do that when I stop reading about existing California jobs moving to Texas.

    “…transfer is a reality we need to embrace.”

    Still waiting for that list of countries that are going to do it like states have.

    “Bottomline there is some definite play with numbers and half truths here.”

    Which numbers? What is the real truth?

    If you guys are going to call me out, back it up. I posted an article that gave hard numbers and cited the source in which they were taken. Not a single person telling me I am wrong has done the same to refute the claim.

  • 99. Tex Taylor  |  August 21, 2011 at 8:41 pm

    Alfie, I think one of the reasons I’ve always liked reading you is that of all the people on this board, you seem to have the least bias. I fully admit I’m a hardcore, small government, Conservative with a small streak of Libertarianism, who also happens to claim I’m Christian. The only Democrat I could vote for would be a conservative one, and I’m not sure those exists anymore.

    I don’t mind Romney for President in the least. I prefer Perry at this moment, not because I find him the ideal candidate, but I’m convinced he would shrink the behemoth the most. I’m sure Romney would make an adequate President but his history troubles me, health care and the vacillation of his abortion position being two.

    It’s worrisome when generally reasonable men like Huck are so easily duped. This is so easy to figure out the WaPo post a piece of rank propaganda. If federal monies were really adding thousands of public jobs compensating for private loss, California and New York, both who received more stimulus money per capita than Texas, would have followed suit with improvement. Both have some of the higher unemployment rates in the nation. So Texas success has to be attributable to something else, whether creation of private jobs or relocation of private jobs.

    My main task this round is to get rid of Obama, because I’m just not talking or acting when I say I think he is a disaster and a curse. I think Hillary Clinton would be equally as incompetent and dangerous. I don’t see a legitimate candidate for President in the Democratic party – not one. I think it has become a party of progressive stooges, antiwar loons, self-serving hypocrites, religious bigots, socialists, and/or red diaper babies who actually hate this country’s very foundations.

    It would appear to me, with or without knowing it, they would like for us to pattern ourselves after Western Europe – the same Western Europe that is failing before our eyes. This has been my observation for over 20 years now. Obama finally confirmed my suspicions were in fact their ultimate pursuit. Some, like Bernie Sanders, think we should turn further left than that. This is so anti American, I believe it borders on treason.

  • 100. Hucking Fypocrites  |  August 21, 2011 at 8:45 pm

    The point all of you are missing is that….what Perry has done to help Texas won’t help America. He has only created an environment for business as that environment relates to the environment in other states. That won’t work when he is competing with China and India.

    And I am also waiting to hear some defense for Perry who says he wants to shrink government, yet increases the size of his at a rate that far exceed private-sector growth over the last 2 years.

    But then what should we expect from a former democrat?

  • 101. Hucking Fypocrites  |  August 21, 2011 at 8:49 pm

    I see some are still trying to make this debate about me as I sit and wait for even an ounce of provable substance.

    “This is so easy to figure out the WaPo post a piece of rank propaganda.”

    Then do it. With substance and supporting links that prove what you say and not ad hominems about religious bigotry and ignorance.

  • 102. Tex Taylor  |  August 21, 2011 at 8:53 pm

    Huck,

    Blacks did it with Obama and it is quickly becoming evident that evangelists will do it with Perry.

    Complete and utter bullshit, from a man blinded by his hatred of organized religion. These are Poolman quality responses Huck. I never thought you innumerate until now.

    Two differences – (1) Perry has a proven track record of success which I provided not only the published results for Texas but every state; (2) I have announced numerous times here that Rubio is my idea of an ideal candidate.

    And yes, I did prove to you that Rick Perry has created new jobs, and that should be more than evident by the lists that were provided in the link. Did you even bother to look? Where did the aggregate net growth of jobs of America come from if not from new jobs Huck? Since we are gaining population Huck, we would have to create new jobs just to maintain the status quo.

    But more than that Huck, Perry has zero control over interstate commerce. The only thing you can fairly measure Perry’s relevance is how has he done in comparison to other states, as he has no measure of control concerning the federal government. And the link I listed demonstrates beyond a shadow of a doubt that the Texas business environment, which is the only thing Perry oversees, is vastly superior to every other state.

    If you guys are going to call me out, back it up. I posted an article that gave hard numbers and cited the source in which they were taken. Not a single person telling me I am wrong has done the same to refute the claim.

    I already did with my link. Like I said, you either didn’t bother to look, or didn’t understand it. And I did source it for you.

    Change our corporate tax laws and you would probably see a return of domestic jobs to America. You can’t blame a governor for the malfeasance of the federal gov’t.

  • 103. Tex Taylor  |  August 21, 2011 at 8:58 pm

    I don’t know what more I can provide as prove that you’re 100%wrong than comment #83…

    You said that would make you happy to be proven wrong. Now you will be delighted. Calling you wrong is not an ad hominem. And having an opinion you’re a religious bigot is no personal attack. So don’t be so vain. I’m simply correcting a misstatement of fact you made.

    You were wrong.

  • 104. Hucking Fypocrites  |  August 21, 2011 at 9:06 pm

    “Complete and utter bullshit, from a man blinded by his hatred of organized religion. These are Poolman quality responses Huck. I never thought you innumerate until now.”

    How is it complete bullshit? I provide proof that the guy uses prayer as agency and it is discounted. I provide proof that the guy talks out of his ass about shrinking government and it is discounted.

    Tex, do you believe Rick perry is flawless?

    “And yes, I did prove to you that Rick Perry has created new jobs, and that should be more than evident by the lists that were provided in the link.”

    Actually…you didn’t. Those jobs may have been new to Texas, but I know for a fact that all of them were not new jobs. That won’t grow America’s economy and it won’t help us get people to work. Texas is not America.

    “I already did with my link. Like I said, you either didn’t bother to look, or didn’t understand it. And I did source it for you.”

    Was that the one that didn’t make any mention of how that private-sector growth compares to public-sector growth during the same period? Go back and read #67. You’ll find that was the original point.

    The lies I accuse Perry of telling are not that he has brought jobs to Texas. Clearly he has. I accuse him of telling a much bigger lie. That he wants to shrink the size of government. That is what the link I gave shows to be a lie, and that is what not a single person has yet to refute.

  • 105. Alfie  |  August 21, 2011 at 9:07 pm

    Huck this is the up to date Texas at a Glance from the BLS
    Proof?!?
    I don’t see how the numbers pan out to even promote the propaganda angle which is clearly a Perry hit piece that falls flat if one only looks at the data.
    If you are unemployed HERE and a company moves to your town and then you get hired for a JOB….how is that not job creation? You are hung up.
    As for what countries will send jobs here?
    Huck this is coming from a guy that likes you.Over the past few years the foreign auto makers have dramatically stimulated the economies of a number of states smart enough to play the game. Hyundai,Kia and Volkswagen to name 3. From 2009 on there have been articles in Europe,I’ll toss you a Speigel link circa 09 if you need it that looks at how the falling dollar has been a driving factor for companies to invest in the States.
    Let’s visit the green economy. Most of the wind and solar guys are from Europe. Forbes had a nice piece on that.
    You rattle of that we’re talking out our ass,you’re off base my friend.

  • 106. Hucking Fypocrites  |  August 21, 2011 at 9:11 pm

    How did that article prove wrong that Rick Perry has grown the private-sector by 0.6% and the public sector by 6.4%?

    So far 3 people have said this is wrong and have yet to offer a shred of substance to prove it.

  • 107. Hucking Fypocrites  |  August 21, 2011 at 9:13 pm

    “You are hung up.”

    And you are all hung up on that, as well. See #106.

  • 108. Hucking Fypocrites  |  August 21, 2011 at 9:14 pm

    Alfie, I am not seeing anything about public-sector growth there.

    Still waiting….

  • 109. Hucking Fypocrites  |  August 21, 2011 at 9:16 pm

    “Between December 2007 and last June, private-sector employment in Texas declined by 0.6 percent while public-sector jobs increased by 6.4 percent, according to the federal Bureau of Labor Statistics. Overall, government employees account for about one-sixth of the workforce in Texas.”

    Prove it wrong.

  • 110. Alfie  |  August 21, 2011 at 9:16 pm

    Huck I guess I’m just a fucking idiot. If you go to the BLS for Texas and look at historical job numbers EVERY FUCKING SECTOR SHOWS HIGHER NUMBERS THAN THE GOVT. FUCK %%%%%’S
    COUNT REAL FUCKING PEOPLE!!!!!!!!!

  • 111. Hucking Fypocrites  |  August 21, 2011 at 9:17 pm

    Hell i was giving Perry even more credit than he deserved today.

    I misread that as 0.6% growth when in fact it was decline.

    And while he grew government by 6.4%

  • 112. Tex Taylor  |  August 21, 2011 at 9:19 pm

    Actually…you didn’t. Those jobs may have been new to Texas, but I know for a fact that all of them were not new jobs. That won’t grow America’s economy and it won’t help us get people to work. Texas is not America.

    No, you said from your link that Texas private sector had shrunk while the public sector had grown. And my link clearly shows it has not the last 10 years, or the last year. I don’t buy that public sector jobs have grown that much either, but I’ll need to take a look. I can guarantee you when we are done posting, we will have proved beyond a shadow of doubt, that was nothing but a hit piece.

    I never once said all of those jobs were “new” jobs. They are “new jobs” to Texas. That is the only element Perry controls. If he took from your state, it is because the citizens of your state have managed their state poorly. And nobody has done it worse.

    You want to create new jobs? You do it exactly the way both Perry and Romney are suggesting you do it. Lower corporate taxes, provide incentives, much less regulation and compliance costs, and create a business friendly climate where corporations are not treated as the enemy. Honey instead of a shit sandwich.

    If you can find me a governor with a better record of private growth and state economics the last three years short of Virginia and McDonnell (and he’s the dreaded Evangelist too – OMG!), then put it up.

    If you have a problem with prayer, I can’t help that. But Perry is doing just as his savior told him to do. You’ll have to take that up with Jesus, I guess.

  • 113. Hucking Fypocrites  |  August 21, 2011 at 9:20 pm

    You are far from an idiot, Alfie. However your link is only for 2011 and my link clearly states from Dec. 2007 to June 2011.

    It proves nothing.

  • 114. Hucking Fypocrites  |  August 21, 2011 at 9:22 pm

    “I never once said all of those jobs were “new” jobs. They are “new jobs” to Texas.”

    Great. Now explain how interstate job transfer/creation/whatever is going to work for America like it did for Texas.

    Still waiting….

  • 115. Tex Taylor  |  August 21, 2011 at 9:23 pm

    Now you’re contradicting your own #63 post Huck. First you said private growth declined, now you’re telling us private growth grew 6/10 of a percent.

    Which is it?

    And my link clearly shows not just the last year but the last 10 years, Texas has “created” “taken” “stolen” more than seven times as many NEW PRIVATE SECTOR jobs than any other state using the same source material you referenced in your post.

  • 116. Hucking Fypocrites  |  August 21, 2011 at 9:26 pm

    “Which is it?”

    “Between December 2007 and last June, private-sector employment in Texas declined by 0.6 percent while public-sector jobs increased by 6.4 percent, according to the federal Bureau of Labor Statistics. Overall, government employees account for about one-sixth of the workforce in Texas.”

    “And my link clearly shows not just the last year but the last 10 years,”

    Which is why I was addressing that comment to Alfie.

    You guys really need to calm down and read better.

  • 117. Tex Taylor  |  August 21, 2011 at 9:28 pm

    You want to create new jobs? You do it exactly the way both Perry and Romney are suggesting you do it. Lower corporate taxes, provide incentives, much less regulation and compliance costs, and create a business friendly climate where corporations are not treated as the enemy. Honey instead of a shit sandwich.

    Once again, Perry can only provide his proposals, just as Romney can only provide his proposal. Neither currently has control of the federal government.

    The above is how they propose to create new jobs. If you disagree with these suggestions, that is your prerogative…but this is what small business in Texas asked for and received.

    But I can assure you Texas is creating “new jobs.” My wife’s privately held company has increased employment by 15% since 2010.

  • 118. Alfie  |  August 21, 2011 at 9:28 pm

    Great. Now explain how interstate job transfer/creation/whatever is going to work for America like it did for Texas.

    Still waiting….
    Not for nothing but are you asking us to prove a theory that is an unknown to economists,candidates and the POTUS but is in fact something all three are trying to figure out????
    And again like my Brooklyn friends say,Not for nothing but are you really buying that %’s are better than actual #’s,hell even the WaPo piece looked at how population growth has effected much of the govt job growth.

  • 119. Tex Taylor  |  August 21, 2011 at 9:29 pm

    You guys really need to calm down and read better.

    Maybe, but you didn’t answer the question. Which is it? Grew or declined in the private sector since 2007? You haven’t even been consistent about that.

  • 120. Hucking Fypocrites  |  August 21, 2011 at 9:29 pm

    “Now you’re contradicting your own #63 post Huck.”

    You really think so? because my #63 reads:

    “I agree. But he is the one that keeps putting them in bounds.”

    You guy are clearly letting rage get the better of you in this. It has gone from affecting your ability to give a substantive argument to affecting your ability to read basic English.

  • 121. Hucking Fypocrites  |  August 21, 2011 at 9:31 pm

    I did answer the question, Tex. Allow me to do it again.

    “Between December 2007 and last June, private-sector employment in Texas declined by 0.6 percent while public-sector jobs increased by 6.4 percent, according to the federal Bureau of Labor Statistics. Overall, government employees account for about one-sixth of the workforce in Texas.”

    Its that. And I am still waiting for a single shred of proof to the contrary.

  • 122. Hucking Fypocrites  |  August 21, 2011 at 9:35 pm

    “Not for nothing but are you asking us to prove a theory that is an unknown to economists,candidates and the POTUS but is in fact something all three are trying to figure out????”

    When you are using that theory to say I am wrong you’re damn straight I am asking you to show proof.

    Look, if I want this form of bullshit I can vote for Obama. Using unprovable theories is what he is all about. I want better for America.

  • 123. Tex Taylor  |  August 21, 2011 at 9:42 pm

    I could have sworn that 63 a few minutes ago. Make it 67 if it helps you gain some self-esteem. :oops:

    But it doesn’t change the fact that both Alfie and I showed your initial claim of declining private sector jobs in Texas wrong – I knew that was bullshit, and you should have known too.

    This is pretty easy to defend and doesn’t require an iota of rage. I learned between your affinity of the feckless U.N. and raging Antisemitism, you’re not terribly rational sometimes. I think you’ve become more taken with academia than you might realize and easily influenced by what I call PHD syndrome. Just my opinion.

    But I think you’re really have a problem in dealing with you were hoodwinked into reading what you wanted to read, and don’t like being proven wrong – comment number or not being misread.

  • 124. fakename2  |  August 21, 2011 at 9:50 pm

    Ah. Nothing like a big fight on the RL Blog. With dueling sources and numbers (mostly percentages).
    Huck, what is wrong with you? Black people elected Obama? How many times must I mention that black people only represent 14% of the population? Of course that number could have changed since the last time I looked, so don’t hold me to it.
    Black peiple no more elected Obama than evangelicals can elect Perry. It can’t be done.

  • 125. Tex Taylor  |  August 21, 2011 at 10:01 pm

    Its that. And I am still waiting for a single shred of proof to the contrary.

    Since my link is not broken out by year but a cumulative of 10 years and the last year of record, I’m not going to go back and check 2008 and 2009. 2010 should have been enough to prove WaPO was full of shit. I won’t bother to even attempt because the result you printed is meaningless to what is really objective.

    But let’s assume you’re right for a minute. You think Perry a miserable failure and liar and take WaPO as gospel truth.

    Covariate? Remember? That’s why I provided that IowaHawk post demonstrating how these liberal rags manipulate results to formulate a story. Pick a point on the timeline and carry it to a timeline. Pure manipulation to make the data fit a desired result.

    And taken over the entire record of the man you called Perry a slick salesman. Yet Perry clearly has an economic record as governor second to none which my link clearly demonstrates over a period of not just a recession, but the record over a decade. So which do you think more accurate? Why has Texas held up better in the recession?

    Do we judge Reagan by 1981, or by 1981-1989?

  • 126. Hucking Fypocrites  |  August 21, 2011 at 10:04 pm

    “But it doesn’t change the fact that both Alfie and I showed your initial claim of declining private sector jobs in Texas wrong”

    No you didn’t. You cherry-picked facts and thought I wouldn’t notice the details.

    Alfie’s link was for 2011, not 2008-2011 which was clearly stated in my original quote. Your link doesn’t show the comparison between public and private sector decline/growth, which were clearly compared in my original quote.

    For the last time…here is the assertion, with the important parts highlighted to avoid any more “confusion.”

    Between December 2007 and last June, private-sector employment in Texas declined by 0.6 percent while public-sector jobs increased by 6.4 percent, according to the federal Bureau of Labor Statistics. Overall, government employees account for about one-sixth of the workforce in Texas.”

    Not a shred of proof has been given to refute that.

    “raging Antisemitism”

    Ah yes. The classic non-argument. I am against Israeli policy, therefore I am against Jews.

    “Huck, what is wrong with you? Black people elected Obama? ”

    I didn’t say that, did I? I said they voted for him. Do you contend differently?

    On a completely different note….any bets on how many times Obama says “I” when he talks about Libya from now on?

  • 127. fakename2  |  August 21, 2011 at 10:04 pm

    Statistics aside, it’s my observation that when the private sector grows jobs, there has to be a corresponding rise in public jobs. It’s completely ridiculous to think that the same number of people in state and local government can handle more volume when the population increases .

  • 128. Hucking Fypocrites  |  August 21, 2011 at 10:08 pm

    “You think Perry a miserable failure..”

    Feel free to argue against what I say. I haven’t used the word “failure” in my assessments.

    “2010 should have been enough to prove WaPO was full of shit”

    Sorry but if you are going to claim someone is wrong you need to use the right parameters. You don’t get to adjust the playing field to your liking.

    I won’t comment on this again until I see proof that refutes the original assertion.

  • 129. Tex Taylor  |  August 21, 2011 at 10:08 pm

    We have people who provide incorrect or misleading results, then we have a person who makes up the entire, fallacious charge. I’m sure there is a purpose for the latter – it must be to insinuate anybody white and not an Obama lackey is a racist.

    Huck, what is wrong with you? Black people elected Obama? How many times must I mention that black people only represent 14% of the population? Of course that number could have changed since the last time I looked, so don’t hold me to it.

    Is there anybody on this board that has stated black people elected Obama? I think we’ve addressed bloc votes, clear and obvious bias, blah blah blah, but I’m here quite a bit, and I don’t believe one time I have read anybody here ever say black people elected Obama by themselves. I’m not sure even Poolman is that bad at math.

    Black peiple no more elected Obama than evangelicals can elect Perry. It can’t be done.

    No, but Evangelicals do make up approximately 20% of the U.S. population. And that is exactly the same size as people who identify as “progressive.”

  • 130. Hucking Fypocrites  |  August 21, 2011 at 10:09 pm

    I appreciate #129, Tex. ;)

  • 131. Hucking Fypocrites  |  August 21, 2011 at 10:10 pm

    “it’s my observation that when the private sector grows jobs, there has to be a corresponding rise in public jobs.”

    How about when it shrinks?

  • 132. Alfie  |  August 21, 2011 at 10:12 pm

    @122 I just don’t know what to say.
    As for the rest of the discussion. I’ve gone over a random sampling of graphs from BLS regards TX. I readily concede that government has an upwards tick,from 2001 onwards let alone 07. Other industry sectors do too as well as dramatic dips and pure roller coaster movement.
    Bottom line I cannot see how anyone can hang their hat on the WaPo piece without looking at how number wise and by that I mean living breathing people getting a check along the entire employment spectrum trounces govt. I also fail to see how the govt growth is somehow bad. I’m more Republican than Tea Partier so I likes cops,fire fighters,sewer workers and teacher numbers going up. I like schools having good ratios as much as I am pretty settled on what the curriculum should be. I’ve seen community decline (MA) and growth (SC and CO) and the logic that govt jobs tick up with population is clear. I don’t see how Texas has experienced anything out of line and definitely not nearing pure Keynesian socialist euro bureaucracy stuff.
    Maybe earlier I should have said something clearer or something but in the big picture Huck,as you’ve presented yourself here,I still think you’re wrong or at least hyper focused on one line item. And even my CAP locks was on,I wasn’t angry,I’m just confused, frustrated, and now too damn tired.

  • 133. Hucking Fypocrites  |  August 21, 2011 at 10:15 pm

    “it’s my observation that when the private sector grows jobs, there has to be a corresponding rise in public jobs. It’s completely ridiculous to think that the same number of people in state and local government can handle more volume when the population increases .”

    Who says population increases with job growth in any sector?

  • 134. Tex Taylor  |  August 21, 2011 at 10:20 pm

    Huck, pedantic or not, I contend you are acting as rank propagandist, becoming exactly what you have condemned against on this blog by Rutherford…

    This MOFO is nothing but a smooth-talking liar telling people what they want to hear while doing something else. We’ve already got 1 of those leading us.

    It’s not enough to beat Obama. We need bullshit-free leadership and that doesn’t seem to be something Rick Perry will provide.

    Your words, not mine. I just showed you the entire Perry economic record – not a point in time, but the entire decade. The man may have many faults – but his economic record, no matter who takes credit, is on record and substantial and there are no lies. I challenge you to find one candidate who has done better under his or her watch.

    If that’s not good enough to prove you are hoodwinked into believing what you want to believe, then pull the Obama lever if you must if Perry happens to win the candidacy.

    It won’t change a thing in the national results. :neutral:

  • 135. Hucking Fypocrites  |  August 21, 2011 at 10:21 pm

    “I also fail to see how the govt growth is somehow bad.”

    It doesn’t matter if it is bad or good. That was never my point.

    What matters is that Perry says he wants to shrink government. Do we all agree that is his position?

    The WaPo piece has shown that Rick Perry has not brought his position for American government to the Texas government he has led for the last 11 years. Period.

  • 136. Hucking Fypocrites  |  August 21, 2011 at 10:27 pm

    “…there are no lies.”

    Perry is a smooth-talking liar when he says he wants to shrink the US government while he has grown the Texan government.

    The numbers show that, on the issue of growing government, which is 1 of his main platforms, Rick Perry does not practice what he is now preaching. I chose to call that “lying.”

    The rest of you can call it whatever you want. But I will point out that when Obama does it, we all call it “lying.” Why should Rick Perry be any different?

  • 137. Tex Taylor  |  August 21, 2011 at 11:24 pm

    Rutherford, important question. I hope you will make the attempt to think this through and answer honestly.

    ——-

    No matter one’s political persuasion, how could blacks not find this Garafalo woman about as purely racist and offensive as one gets?

    http://www.realclearpolitics.com/video/2011/08/18/garofalo_herman_cain_being_paid_to_run_he_suffers_from_stockholm_syndrome.html

    There is no spinning this. Herman Cain is a self-made man, is he not? A very successful self-made man. Are blacks so beholden to the Democratic party that they don’t recognize what this horrid woman is suggesting?

    Do blacks not recognize this witch, a stalwart of the progressive politic, is suggesting that even the most successful of blacks are so helpless and stupid, that they are used like beasts of burden or pawns to be moved on a chessboard?

    I honestly can find no difference between Janine Garofalo’s suggestions and David Duke.

  • 138. Rutherford  |  August 22, 2011 at 1:22 am

    To Alfie and Tex. I don’t think I’ve been tested for Crohns if such a test exists. It’s one of the diagnoses I fear because I had an employee with Crohns 15 years ago who underwent two surgeries to correct it and wore a colostomy bag in between surgeries. (One of my best employees btw). That’s a road I don’t look forward to going down. :-(

    Tex, with my scoliosis, I wonder if I’m at greater risk for diverticulitis. My mother died of sepsis due to undetected diverticulitis. By the time they went in and discovered it, it was too late.

  • 139. Rutherford  |  August 22, 2011 at 1:32 am

    I’ve got to go to bed so I don’t have time tonight to comment on everything I’d like to … but

    Huck, the biggest employer in Texas is the US Military (Fort Hood specifically) and Perry balanced his Texas budget on the back of 25 billion from the “failed” stimulus from the Fed government he so hates. Texas ranks 47th in wages … all that great job growth, minimum wage jobs mostly.

    Hypocrite and liar don’t even begin to describe Perry. That’s why the GOP establishment is still looking for a candidate. They don’t like Romney and most of the others are crackpots.

  • 140. pfesser53  |  August 22, 2011 at 7:09 am

    Poolman –

    re: comment # 79. Thanks for the link. I couldn’t agree more. I really fear for my country and my children.

    I had not read Goldwater’s Conscience of a Conservative. It is listed for the Kindle on Amazon at $1.99. What a steal! Getting my Kindle loaded up for winter.

  • 141. pfesser53  |  August 22, 2011 at 7:18 am

    fakename –
    “I understand the attraction to Ron Paul, but you have to accept his good ideas along with the whacked ones.”

    What are the whacked ones? My guess is his stand on drug legalization. If that is the case, be aware that he is in some very good company, including William F. Buckley, Jr.

    “Plus, like it or not, this is a two-party system.”

    Not by design; just by the way it has worked out so far.

    “You have to pick. If you want to vote for Ron Paul to “make a statement”, please go ahead. It will be like voting for Ralph Nader.”

    Great quote from Ross Perot: “You only throw away your vote if you don’t vote your conscience.” I think everybody needs to stop trying to game the system, vote his conscience, and let the chips fall where they may. Let the system work.

  • 142. pfesser53  |  August 22, 2011 at 7:25 am

    Rutherford –

    re: #128. One of the easiest tests for Crohn’s is a CT scan with IV and oral contrast. No colostomy bags required. No enemas. (unless you are INTO that sort of thing) It will also pick up diverticulitis with a VERY high sensitivity. About a couple hours for the contrast to go through your bowel and about ten minutes for the scan itself. Easy as can be.

    I know of no relationship between diverticulitis and scoliosis. Eat your greens. Keeps the colonic pressures down and prevents those pressures from producing the ‘tics to begin with.

  • 143. pfesser53  |  August 22, 2011 at 7:37 am

    Don’t know a thing about the source, but if this doesn’t scare the hell out of you, well is should:

    http://news.yahoo.com/blogs/ticket/seven-ways-rick-perry-wants-change-constitution-131634517.html

  • 144. El Tigre  |  August 22, 2011 at 8:45 am

    FN says, “Perry has to weasel out of having taken $17 billion in stimulus funds while dismissing the stimulus as a failure.”

    Since the funds were taken from Texas too, he’d be a fool not to accept a portion of them wouldn’t he? That’s hardly the same thing as endorsing the stimulus plan or big government. Kind of a dumb argument really.

    R, how is the military “employment” factored into the figures? Are you just saying that the military creates demand for goods and services in the private sector by being stationed there?

  • 145. Rutherford  |  August 22, 2011 at 9:22 am

    Pfesser, thanks for the info on diagnosing Crohns. I wasn’t suggesting that the TEST involved colostomy bags. I was suggesting the treatment might. Since I always had the approach of not digging into my employee’s personal lives, I never knew exactly why my employee required surgery. I just knew he had Crohns. Maybe he let it go too long and it damaged the intestine so badly he needed surgery? I need to read up on the disease. I know nothing about it.

  • 146. Rutherford  |  August 22, 2011 at 9:24 am

    Are you just saying that the military creates demand for goods and services in the private sector by being stationed there?

    You’re making this too complicated.

    Perry says he hates the fed government.
    Perry brags about huge job growth in Texas.
    A great preponderance of the jobs are courtesy of the dreaded Fed.

    Very simple.

  • 147. Rutherford  |  August 22, 2011 at 9:28 am

    That’s hardly the same thing as endorsing the stimulus plan or big government. Kind of a dumb argument really.

    It’s not a dumb argument at all and it’s an argument the GOPhers dodge at all costs.

    There are countless pictures of hypocritical Republican congress-critters posing in front of some stimulus-funded venture, taking credit for it, while all the while declaring the stimulus a failure.

    It’s understandable why you or some others might call it a failure. You don’t see its fruits. Many congressmen know better.

  • 148. Tex Taylor  |  August 22, 2011 at 10:11 am

    This Perry hate fest amuses me. It’s so obvious the reasons. If Christie does happen to get in, it will happen to him too. That’s why so many are moving to Texas Rutherford: (1) low Wages; (2) large Federal Gov’t presence. :lol:

    The conclusions make about as much sense as Maxine “Nationalize” Waters saying to hell with the Tea Party, blaming them for California’s problems, when California is controlled virtually exclusively by liberal Dimocrats. California is the future of America – look at it and enjoy your destiny.

    Actually, I would happily move to Texas if they did choose to secede, my elderly parents pass, and mom wasn’t insistent about keeping the house…be done with this mess of sharing a country with millions upon millions of brain dead fools quickly carving up their legacy’s future. I would dearly love to put to the test a real case of who is right and who is wrong.

    Every time I go to Texas (at least once a month), I observe it and think “this is the best managed state by far.” Beautiful roads, clean cities (even the small ones), bunches of money, zero state income taxes, high quality people for the most part, and great, affordable colleges. Makes me jealous I’m not a part of it. I need to be.

    P.S. Rutherford – I noticed you let Garofalo’s blatant white racism slide without comment. :wink: Guess it’s okay to call blacks puppets if you belong to the right party and your company with Keith Olbermann, hey?

  • 149. Tex Taylor  |  August 22, 2011 at 10:34 am

    It’s understandable why you or some others might call it a failure. You don’t see its fruits. Many congressmen know better.

    A couple/few of questions: (1) What were the lasting fruits again? ; (2) What did it stimulate? ; (3) Why should congressmen not take the money? Their constituents paid for it to begin with and we damn sure don’t want to dump more money than we have to down a rat hole for some lefty, parasitical state; (4) what are you going to use to justify Obama’s successes again in 2012?

    The stimulus is the best you’ve got? What about healthcare? :grin:

    2012 Prediction: Somewhere down the line, after we’ve kicked the Obama record down the rabbit hole in a matter of minutes, the main theme of the Obama campaign will be consistent charges of “Wanting America to fail.” It’s already reared its head the past couple of weeks. That will become progressives main talking point.

  • 150. Alfie  |  August 22, 2011 at 10:56 am

    I don’t think the military is counted in jobs tallies,I could be wrong but I’d be surprised.
    More likely the Fed jobs are administrative as well as things like Marshals and Border Patrol,ICE etc as well as the NASA thing touted by the WaPo,Krugman and US News stories..
    On the state side one cannot lose focus on the size of the Texas public university and college industry. Also lost on some perhaps is the county make up of Texas which ups the govt. jobs tally. So two out of three subsectors are not the purview of the Austin admin.

  • 151. El Tigre  |  August 22, 2011 at 11:07 am

    “It’s not a dumb argument at all and it’s an argument the GOPhers dodge at all costs.”

    Yes it is, and so is your response. You think the funds taken from citizens of Texas through federal compulsion should go to California or Connecticut or Illinois if Perry were true to his beliefs?

    I think the SS system is completely fucked up. But God Damn it, I’ve paid into my entire working life and will damn sure take the checks when they are issued to me. If you were to apply the same logic, you would say, “well if you don’t like SS then you’re a hypocrite for accepting the check.” :roll:

    Of course what constitutes other peoples money and resources eludes liberals so I guess faulting your logic is like faulting a frog for being green.

    Might I ask, what stimulus projects is Perry taking credit for Rutherford?

  • 152. El Tigre  |  August 22, 2011 at 11:09 am

    Also, R, my question was what part of the military “employment” is figured into the statistics. I suspect it’s none. If so, then it’s not at all true that “[a] great preponderance of the jobs are courtesy of the dreaded Fed.”

    Very simple indeed.

  • 153. Tex Taylor  |  August 22, 2011 at 11:50 am

    Great point about Social Security Tigre. I am always looking for a good analogy to simplify in terms liberals might understand – and that was a good one. Whether it was understood remains to be seen.

    See how specious these charges liberals make? They are so dishonest in their argument, frivolity of thought, and misperception of reality and result, it is getting more difficult to carry on conversation. A majority of the time is wasted trying to argue and convince with what used to be basic knowledge. Forget trying to cover more complex issues.

    I still contend liberalism is a mental deficiency – and I believe it shows. Look at most of California, Chicago, Detroit, D.C., and New York – prime examples. Every advantage of natural resource and wealth, and they have made an abortion of them – dominated by secular liberals, corrupt unions and the politically correct speech and thought police.

    The rest of the country will follow their path if we don’t begin to divest ourselves of their mess.

  • 154. MuffyMcD  |  August 22, 2011 at 12:14 pm

    Whew, you guys move fast.

    “I have to tell you, while I would absolutely love to see Christie get in (I can’t help but like the guy) I would be annoyed because I believed him when he said he wouldn’t get in, no way, no how. If he gets in, it tells me he’s just another sly pol whose word means nothing. -Rutherford

    From what I’ve heard, the number one reason Christie isn’t running is – his family. I hope he changes his mind and I’ll forgive him for it because I think that the country needs him. But more than that – I wish more people in Washington were like him.
    —–
    Bert and Ernie are a couple, eh. Who’s brainchild is this? As liberal a guy as he was (if memory serves me), I think Jim Henson would probably die all over again. The show’s demographic is children ages 1-6. Do we really need to explain Miss Piggy and Kermit’s attraction to each other? Or that Oscar is homeless because he lost his job and his wife took the kids and left him? Cut it out.
    —–
    “I’m ready for my ass-kicking.” -Rutherford

    I’m always up for that, Rutherford. My two cents is that working outside the home should be everyone’s prerogative as long as one parent stays home with the kids. There isn’t enough time in the day and it’s unfair to shortchange the kids on mom and/or dad’s attention.

    Expectations are tricky though. And the trick is not to concern yourself too much with what others decide is or isn’t in yours or your children’s best interests. Personally I’ve always thought the expectations were unfair to men. I think in general women do a better job of carrying the daily load and never putting it down, while men are better at managing the heavy lifting. Of course I have seen some spectacular exceptions to that norm.

    My expectation is that more women and men will gravitate towards working electronically from home. We’ve gotten away from “family” and we realize it.
    —–
    Happy Birthday, Elvis! -FN2

    OK, that was funny.

  • 155. poolman  |  August 22, 2011 at 12:33 pm

    My expectation is that more women and men will gravitate towards working electronically from home. We’ve gotten away from “family” and we realize it.

    Mine too. Not only is it good for “family”, but saves energy, reduces traffic, eliminates wasted drive times and associated risk, while reducing air pollution and vehicular wear and tear. Also it assists in maintaining community.

    Many of our problems would be alleviated if we focused on rebuilding local communities and got away from an impersonal global approach toward solutions. It goes against the models of capitalism and corporatism, however, so I don’t anticipate the media pushing that concept very hard.

  • 156. an800lbgorilla  |  August 22, 2011 at 12:40 pm

    I’m curious Huck, if not Perry, then who?

    To be honest, I’m undecided at this point…

  • 157. MuffyMcD  |  August 22, 2011 at 12:44 pm

    Whose not who’s.

    ain’t it?

  • 158. Rutherford  |  August 22, 2011 at 12:45 pm

    Or that Oscar is homeless because he lost his job and his wife took the kids and left him?

    Muffy, that was truly classic! :-)

    I must confess when the lady asked Christie why he sent his kids to Catholic school, I applauded when Christie essentially said “mind your own f*cking business”. ROTFLMAO!

    At least so far, Christie is a human being. We don’t have too many of them in Washington. The question is …will Christie change Washington or will Washington change Christie?

  • 159. Hucking Fypocrites  |  August 22, 2011 at 12:48 pm

    Dummy Obama is so out of touch with the American people he now thinks we don’t know the difference between the president and congress.

  • 160. Rutherford  |  August 22, 2011 at 12:48 pm

    Also it assists in maintaining community.

    Ahhh but does it? As someone who has worked from home for several years (my wife does too), there is a social isolation that goes along with it.

    G is right about most of the advantages but the jury is out with me on work-at-home’s impact on our social structure and community.

  • 161. Rutherford  |  August 22, 2011 at 12:49 pm

    I apologize … the comment I quoted was from Poolman, not Gorilla. Mea culpa. :oops:

  • 162. Rutherford  |  August 22, 2011 at 12:53 pm

    I’m curious Huck, if not Perry, then who?

    I’ll toss in my two cents. Assuming no one else gets in the race, you boys are going to have to abandon your fear of RINO’s and get behind Romney or Huntsman. They are the only sensible folks on the scene who stand a chance of getting elected. And interestingly, they’re both Mormons.

    I DO like Ron Paul but can’t forgive him for his racist newsletters from years past. Ron Paul is the true answer to your RINO-phobia. But we all know he won’t get nominated.

    If you REALLY want Obama gone, get behind Mitt and Jon. Simple as that.

  • 163. dead rabbit  |  August 22, 2011 at 12:55 pm

    There is just too many different scenarios that I see oil going up.

    I bought USO fund option call’s for November…strike 38 bucks a share….

    Bring on the war, storms and locusts, rivers of blood…I don’t give a fuck.

  • 164. Hucking Fypocrites  |  August 22, 2011 at 12:58 pm

    G, I have not yet decided, either. I am waiting until the field finishes its ebbs and flows before I start digging into whose platform is what, and so on. I have particular issues that are important to me and others that are not that important to me. Once the field is more set I will see who does and doesn’t meet me on them.

    Right now at face value I like Ron Paul, but I know he has no chance at the nomination. So for a safe 2nd I am liking Mitt. But its a very “soft” kind of “like” for both.

    I just don’t have the time to get excited over people who might not even make a primary ballot.

  • 165. Hucking Fypocrites  |  August 22, 2011 at 1:03 pm

    “There is just too many different scenarios that I see oil going up.”

    Could be. But also could be not.

    Conflict in Libya could go either way. It it is a smooth transition, that could help get more Libyan oil into the market.

    Also, with global economic decline comes a decline in consumption, and, in turn, production. People will use less oil to make and ship stuff, also effecting supply and demand.

    I guess that’s why they call it gambling. Good luck!

  • 166. an800lbgorilla  |  August 22, 2011 at 1:12 pm

    your fear of RINO’s and get behind Romney or Huntsman. They are the only sensible folks on the scene who stand a chance of getting elected. ” – R

    Why?

  • 167. Rutherford  |  August 22, 2011 at 1:13 pm

    Veteran’s Today and Rolling Stone magazine.

    Sorry Tex, the two don’t belong in the same sentence. I’d wager good money you’ve never read a word Matt Taibi has written. If you did, you’d like him at least for his balls.

    I don’t deny that Rolling Stone’s raison d’être is to cover the music industry but their political articles are of a quality you’d NEVER expect from a music mag.

  • 168. Rutherford  |  August 22, 2011 at 1:18 pm

    You vote for Obama again, you obviously hate America, because it will crumble if he is elected for another 4 years.

    So let me get this straight, Senor Hyperbole, from 2013 to 2017 (just four more years) Obama will cause the nation to crumble? I don’t think you believe he is competent enough to make the nation crumble in four more years. ;-)

  • 169. Hucking Fypocrites  |  August 22, 2011 at 1:24 pm

    “I don’t think you believe he is competent enough to make the nation crumble in four more years. ”

    President Obama can’t ruin the nation in 4 years but a fringe faction in congress can ruin it in 2?

  • 170. poolman  |  August 22, 2011 at 1:31 pm

    I do a lot of my work sitting at the computer, including promotion and sales, drafting, scheduling, billing, and bookkeeping. I have a work area in my garage to repair pool pump motors and such. I can go outside to check the mail and usually run into one of the neighbors. There is a sense of security knowing who your neighbors are and who’s at home. A special bonus is I get to interact with my grandkids when they are out of school and stay here.

    I’m also involved in my local church community. We provide services to the community through our “Compassion” ministry – food, clothing, marriage and financial counseling, job fairs, prayer, etc. We also encourage small groups that mainly meet in various homes during the week.

    It does take some motivation on my part to participate in the community. There are plenty who are anti-social and it is easier to isolate oneself from the outside world with all the electronic entertainment sources that exist. Many do acquire a hermit mentality.

    So no, it isn’t automatic. It does take effort to interact. I think it is important that we do make the effort. With all the ways we have to communicate in today’s world, ironically we are distancing ourselves further from the personal interaction and real communication that takes place when we are forced to deal with each other without the electronic devices we love. It’s more “human”, something this world system is redefining and actively poised against.

  • 171. El Tigre  |  August 22, 2011 at 1:40 pm

    Huntsman is a dead man walking.

  • 172. El Tigre  |  August 22, 2011 at 1:46 pm

    “They are the only sensible folks on the scene who stand a chance of getting elected.”

    I wouldn’t count on it. A large portion of Obama’s base has abandoned him. It’ll be a matter of turn-out in a general election.

  • 173. Tex Taylor  |  August 22, 2011 at 1:46 pm

    So let me get this straight, Senor Hyperbole, from 2013 to 2017 (just four more years) Obama will cause the nation to crumble? I don’t think you believe he is competent enough to make the nation crumble in four more years.

    I think Obama can do it by simply getting elected.

    And yes, I’ve read Matt Taibbi and he looks and sounds like he sucks grapefruit through a garden hose – a real pussy. No wonder you love him. He’s a buffoon in Men’s Health – completely clueless and uninformed.

    Did you enjoy Matt’s “The 52 Funniest Things About The Upcoming Death of The Pope?” I’d happily vaporize the MOFO’s if I thought I could get away with it. It will be a glorious day when he dies a horrid death – hopefully the most painful and humiliating possible. :twisted:

    Any other questions?

  • 174. Rutherford  |  August 22, 2011 at 1:46 pm

    I don’t see a legitimate candidate for President in the Democratic party – not one.

    You need to look a bit at Harold Ford Jr. He’s definitely a blue dog. When he sits on a liberal panel on a talk show, he looks visibly uncomfortable. The dude just doesn’t buy the liberal agenda hook line and sinker. Now I’m not saying he’s “presidential” per se … he lacks a certain gravitas but I think you could swallow him down without getting sick to your stomach.

  • 175. Tex Taylor  |  August 22, 2011 at 1:48 pm

    It’s kind of a shame Ron Paul is such an isolationist. He’s actually got some great ideas concerning the Fed and monetary policy. In fact, I haven’t heard anybody else in government who I believe understands the problem like Paul does.

    But you’re never going to win with Paul’s bewildering foreign policy and suggestions. Paul would be worth sticking in a Cabinet position someplace, for the humor alone.

  • 176. Tex Taylor  |  August 22, 2011 at 1:50 pm

    You need to look a bit at Harold Ford Jr. He’s definitely a blue dog.

    Haw! A complete lightweight. The boner couldn’t make out of Tennessee’s primaries, much less win a national election. Perhaps you can run Maxine Waters. Two intellectual giants.

  • 177. Rutherford  |  August 22, 2011 at 1:52 pm

    LOL … Tex I was unaware of Taibi’s poke at the Pope, not that it surprises me tremendously.

    Also not surprisingly, we will have to agree to disagree. My only gripe about Taibi is the degree which he throws around F-bombs. Otherwise, I see him tossing grenades at any who deserve it, including libs. On a trivial note, I grew up seeing his dad, Mike, on the local New York news station.

  • 178. Hucking Fypocrites  |  August 22, 2011 at 1:53 pm

    “Paul would be worth sticking in a Cabinet position someplace…”

    Like SoS. He understands that our running FP has failed, and has common sense answers to the problem.

    But that will never happen, either. Someone’s lobby is WAY too strong to ever let Ron Paul get his hands on any power.

  • 179. Tex Taylor  |  August 22, 2011 at 1:54 pm

    During his campaign for the House of Representatives, Harold Ford sat for and failed the Tennessee bar exam; he has said that he intends to try again. ** GUFFAW **

    And you call Republicans brainless? Obama Jr. material with a more pleasant demeanor. :lol:

  • 180. Rutherford  |  August 22, 2011 at 1:58 pm

    On 175 and 176 Tex earns two strikes. One more and … well you know.

    The Maxine Waters comparison was an easy, lazy and ill informed racially based equivalency. Waters and Ford could not be more dissimilar politically. But I do agree with you Tex that Ford is a lightweight.

    As for Paul’s foreign policy … the main damn reason why I love the man. We occupy countries all over the planet. We throw our money down a hole in places where our military interests ended long ago.

    I always think, would we ever tolerate various countries keeping armed forces on our land for strategic reasons? Hell no. Paul is right. We need to bring a good 75% of our boys and girls home and mind our own f*cking business … and heal our own nation. :evil:

  • 181. Hucking Fypocrites  |  August 22, 2011 at 1:58 pm

    I love this quote….

    “Obama tells the public to wait patiently, because his Policy Magic will take three or four or, who knows, six years to finally kick in and start having a positive impact on the economy.

    On the other hand, he’s also trying to sell the case that the very meager Republican policy gains kicked in almost immediately and have caused the plunge back to recession.

    Obama’s medicine seems to be of the mid-to-long-term variety, whereas Republican poison takes effect quickly, with the results immediately evident in the body public.”

  • 182. Tex Taylor  |  August 22, 2011 at 2:06 pm

    :lol: I’m out!

    Look, I can’t help it if Harold and Maxine are both imbeciles. I think it’s unfair of you to threaten me for simply pointing out how unintelligent both are – who cares what their political philosophy is. :twisted: Okay, I’ll throw Roseanne Barr or Joy Behar into your mix to soothe your sensitivities.

    Not my fault if the both Maxine and Harold just happen to be hyphenated Americans.

    Like my new descriptor? It covers all the bases. Still politically correct, convenient, short, and to the point. Or does overuse of that get me the boot? :smile:

  • 183. El Tigre  |  August 22, 2011 at 2:12 pm

    “Waters and Ford could not be more dissimilar politically.”

    And of course Ford is a regular on MSNBC.

    Ask anyone that doesn’t watch MSNBC is they know who Ford is. Lightweight is the understatement of the century.

    And he should be disqualified for failing the Tennessee bar. That’s like losing a game of tic-tac-toe.

  • 184. Tex Taylor  |  August 22, 2011 at 2:19 pm

    And he should be disqualified for failing the Tennessee bar. That’s like losing a game of tic-tac-toe.

    :lol: :lol:

    And the most tragic part is Harold is particle physicist when sitting next to Joe Biden.

    We’ll be lucky if China doesn’t push the nuclear button when that asshole’s in the air. No telling who Jolting Joe has offended. Probably made a couple of zipper head jokes while at the dinner table.

    That’s why it imperative nothing happen to Obama. We’re much better off bowing and kissing the ring than personally offending the Prime Minister.

  • 185. dead rabbit  |  August 22, 2011 at 2:34 pm

    Man I just read some of that 52 funny things about the Pope dying.

    It wasn’t even witty.

    That was pure and pointless disrespect for no other reason other then to be hurtful.

    Its also a real cowardly, too. He should have gone with 52 funny things about the death of Nelson Mandela. At least he would be taking some kind risk writing that.

  • 186. Hucking Fypocrites  |  August 22, 2011 at 2:49 pm

    I am going to go ahead and guess that the CBO can’t score an outline any better than it can score a speech.

  • 187. Rutherford  |  August 22, 2011 at 3:00 pm

    Black peiple no more elected Obama than evangelicals can elect Perry. It can’t be done.

    Amen, sister.

    I’ll give Huck the benefit of the doubt and suggest he is saying black folk voted for Obama more out of racial solidarity than any understanding of what the man had to offer …. and similarly, evangelical Christians may fall into a similar pattern voting for Perry.

    But of course, there is no way in hell blacks “elected” Obama. If blacks were capable of dominating an election, we would never have had Reagan or either Bush.

  • 188. Hucking Fypocrites  |  August 22, 2011 at 3:06 pm

    Does that red herring you are biting into taste good, Rutherford?

    Nobody said blacks elected Obama. Nobody.

    So why are you continuing to press that?

  • 189. Hucking Fypocrites  |  August 22, 2011 at 3:11 pm

    “I’ll give Huck the benefit of the doubt and suggest he is saying black folk voted for Obama more out of racial solidarity than any understanding of what the man had to offer …. and similarly, evangelical Christians may fall into a similar pattern voting for Perry.”

    How nice of you to give me the benefit of the doubt for meaning something that I specifically said.

  • 190. Rutherford  |  August 22, 2011 at 3:52 pm

    Do blacks not recognize this witch, a stalwart of the progressive politic, is suggesting that even the most successful of blacks are so helpless and stupid, that they are used like beasts of burden or pawns to be moved on a chessboard?

    Point taken Tex.

    Look, I’ve made it no secret that I find black and women Republicans a bit odd. However, I must also admit it is the height of arrogance and condescension to suggest that any demographic has to “fall in line”. I’d love to see a black conservative candidate with good capitalistic ideas for reducing the crippling effects of poverty in this country. And when you fight poverty, you help poor whites and poor blacks.

    I’ll tell you guys a secret … don’t tell anyone else … now that we’re in Illinois we no longer get Current TV and I don’t miss Olbermann one bit. I’ll watch a podcast or two of his now and then but the truth is Olbermann took an opportunity to be a great progressive broadcaster given free rein from Gore to do what he pleased and he blew it on petty smacks at MSNBC, and surrounding himself with snarky folks like Garafolo, Kos and Michael Moore.

    I like both Garafolo and Moore in small doses. Kos not so much. The problem with all of them is that there is so much anger there. Liberals need to bring light, not heat, to the debate.

  • 191. Rutherford  |  August 22, 2011 at 4:00 pm

    Don’t know a thing about the source, but if this doesn’t scare the hell out of you, well is should:

    I covered Rick’s 7 constitutional changes on my “radio” show last night. Alfie covers this on his blog. I have a question about electing Senators still pending on his blog. I hope he answers there or here.

  • 192. poolman  |  August 22, 2011 at 4:06 pm

    Big brother has arrived. Another great reason to dump those unhealthy cell phones, and kick the neocons to the curb, if it isn’t too late.

    All of this means that the government now believes that it has the right to know where you are 24/7. Further, it thinks that it can exercise that right without any recourse to the courts and without any probable cause. President Barack Obama, who called for greater transparency and accountability in government when he was running for office, now supports the right of his administration to invade the privacy of every American without any due process at all. It is perhaps not a stretch to speculate how this technological invasion of the United States is blowback from the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, where biometrics, tracking devices, and other features of population control and electronic warfare have been tested and improved. Certainly the willingness of the American public to accept systematic invasions of privacy is a tribute to the selling of the narrative about the Global War on Terror as a rational response to an existential threat. Perhaps it is time to start offering a different narrative, one without Richard Perle’s moral clarity, that sees a bit of nuance and accepts that constitutional liberties must be preserved even in times of perpetual and global warfare. Especially in such times. Ironically, the only war that the Obama administration is winning at the moment is the one against the American people.

  • 193. Rutherford  |  August 22, 2011 at 4:07 pm

    President Obama can’t ruin the nation in 4 years but a fringe faction in congress can ruin it in 2?

    If by fringe faction you mean the Tea Party Caucus, when did I ever say they would “ruin” the country or make it crumble?

    Yes, I do believe the Tea Party’s embrace of simplistic solutions based on their own ignorance is a threat to the country but I don’t believe a grand experiment, 235 years in the making can be completely undone in two, four or even eight years. Maybe I have a bit more faith in the American people than I let on.

  • 194. Rutherford  |  August 22, 2011 at 4:12 pm

    Poolman in 170 you’ve hit upon one of the themes in the film “The Social Network”. Facebook can reunite people who haven’t heard from each other in decades. But it can also substitute for REAL relationships.

    I know for a fact my misanthropic tendencies have increased three-fold since I started working from home.

  • 195. Rutherford  |  August 22, 2011 at 4:16 pm

    Obama’s medicine seems to be of the mid-to-long-term variety, whereas Republican poison takes effect quickly, with the results immediately evident in the body public.

    Let’s put it another way. If I shoot you in the head, it will take a helluva long time to recover unless you’re remarkable like Gabby Giffords. The gunshot takes seconds. The recovery takes years. ;-)

  • 196. Rutherford  |  August 22, 2011 at 4:17 pm

    Let’s put it another way, a way that indicts Obama as much as anyone else. I know from personal experience I can spend money a helluva lot faster than I can earn it. ;-)

  • 197. Tex Taylor  |  August 22, 2011 at 4:23 pm

    Tea Party’s own ignorance? It’s a proven fact that after taking a look at the demographic, the Tea Partiers are better educated, take far fewer federal perks, better behaved if you measure them cleaning up after their rallies say against the Obama flag wavers, and have greater net wealth than the general populace.

    You have a strange definition of ignorance.

    My definition of ignorance is multi-generational welfare, whining about feeding six young kids with unknown fathers because the food stamps are late, and believing someone standing in front of Styrofoam columns promising to calm the seas, would also be paying for your gas and rent for the next four years.

    But I’m glad you somewhat recognize the obvious racism of the skank and the blubber butt dick weed named Olbermann.

  • 198. Rutherford  |  August 22, 2011 at 4:25 pm

    Or does overuse of that get me the boot?

    LOL you’re so used to getting the boot at Grannies, that I knew you’d misinterpret my “threat”. It was just a stupid baseball analogy and nothing more. I could no more ban you than ban my own grandmother. (Mmmmm, sounds like Obama. :-) )

  • 199. Tex Taylor  |  August 22, 2011 at 4:26 pm

    But Rutherford, I’m glad you’re back. Who knows? Maybe Tex can snap you away from those misanthropic tendencies and resort back to sheer rage against the machine. It’s so much more fun. :smile:

  • 200. Tex Taylor  |  August 22, 2011 at 4:28 pm

    LOL you’re so used to getting the boot at Grannies, that I knew you’d misinterpret my “threat”.

    Are you kidding? :roll: If you were going to boot me, I’ve given you at least six zillion reasons to do so before today. I knew what you were saying – I was being a smart ass, as is customary.

    Besides, you’d miss your prodigal brother.

    Did you like my new term hyphenated American? Pretty catchy, huh?

  • 201. Tex Taylor  |  August 22, 2011 at 4:30 pm

    Question: What’s the difference between a Federal Jobs Creation Program and Kim Kardashian’s wedding?

    Answer: Kim Kardashian’s wedding creates jobs.
    :smile: Andrew Klavan – a really funny man.

  • 202. Hucking Fypocrites  |  August 22, 2011 at 4:32 pm

    “If by fringe faction you mean the Tea Party Caucus, when did I ever say they would “ruin” the country or make it crumble?”

    To be exact, you said it on August 9, 2011 at 5:14 pm.

    “I’m beginning to think we are seeing the failure of many systems we have always assumed were hard-wired to be successful … capitalism and democracy being two of them.”

    Since the US is a relative democracy and a capitalist society, I would say that if you think those 2 things are failing, then you think the country is crumbling. And you’ve been more than clear about who you blame for it.

  • 203. Rutherford  |  August 22, 2011 at 6:39 pm

    Nobody said blacks elected Obama. Nobody.

    That’s odd Huck. I thought I actually came to your defense.

  • 204. Rutherford  |  August 22, 2011 at 6:41 pm

    How nice of you to give me the benefit of the doubt for meaning something that I specifically said.

    LOL touchy touchy. Hey man, I’m on your side with the Perry dispute. Control the aim of that machine gun. :-)

  • 205. Rutherford  |  August 22, 2011 at 6:43 pm

    Another great reason to dump those unhealthy cell phones

    Damn, cell phones. So THAT’s how my wife found out I had lunch at Hooters instead of IHOP. She musta gotten tipped by Big Brother! :-( Shoulda left that damn cell phone at home.

  • 206. Rutherford  |  August 22, 2011 at 6:48 pm

    August 9, 2011 at 5:14 pm

    That’s what I get for arguing with an academic. If nothing else Huck is good at research. ;-)

    My only quibble is that I don’t blame the Tea Party exclusively for the danger that both capitalism and democracy are in, particularly capitalism. The failure of capitalism rests on the shoulders of its participants who have focused on profit without remembering all the other benefits that capitalism should provide … like a robust American job market.

  • 207. poolman  |  August 22, 2011 at 9:25 pm

  • 208. Rutherford  |  August 23, 2011 at 12:58 am

    Poolman, at some point in the video, Ron Paul said exactly what I said earlier. Would we EVER tolerate China keeping troops here to protect their interests?

    Ron Paul’s foreign policy is right on the money. Unfortunately it means the end of the American empire and that scares too many people. No one likes to give up perceived power, even if giving it up does keep us safer and richer.

  • 209. Hucking Fypocrites  |  August 23, 2011 at 1:12 am

    That is an absolutely terrible comparison.

    Name 1 country where we have troops and the leaders of that country don’t want us there.

  • 210. Rutherford  |  August 23, 2011 at 1:26 am

    I think that’s a dodge Huck. Osama bin Laden wasn’t the leader of any country. The anger at our presence doesn’t need to come from the leader of a country. If the country’s citizens, particularly its radicals, are offended we have a problem. So we need a compelling reason to be present in any other country. I submit we don’t have a compelling reason to be in some of the countries we currently occupy.

  • 211. poolman  |  August 23, 2011 at 1:28 am

    Exactly, Rutherford. It’s true. We don’t agree with their form of government or religion. From a moral perspective, they perform the most abortions and are the greatest perpetrators of infanticide that this planet has seen, yet we overlook all that in the name of capitalism, America’s true religion. Talk about outright hypocrisy!

    Most Americans don’t look at things from the rest of the world’s perspective. We are perfectly fine letting China help bail us out of the debt that maintaining this “empire” has gotten us into, but we damn sure won’t relinquish any control.

    The American empire is going to end, one way or another. We cannot maintain it. We may as well save face and relinquish it voluntarily, imo. But try explaining that to a neocon. They would rather go down fighting and drag the rest of humanity with them. :twisted:

  • 212. poolman  |  August 23, 2011 at 1:34 am

    Name 1 country where we have troops and the leaders of that country don’t want us there.

    Who would risk upsetting us? The people in many of these nations don’t want us there, even if their leaders claim they do. I know that from personal experience in Germany. Many of the leaders are puppets we established in these nations. South Korea, for one, is a prime example of this.

  • 213. poolman  |  August 23, 2011 at 1:59 am

    One thing I picked up from the RP video that I did not know was that his campaign contributions from military personnel far exceed any other candidate. Obama was a distant second place. The rest were very low in comparison.

    This fact, coupled with the extremely high suicide rate in the military, attests to the unrighteousness of our foreign policy in the eyes of boots on the ground. It’s past time to end this injustice. I don’t see any other candidates willing to make that bold stand.

  • 214. Hucking Fypocrites  |  August 23, 2011 at 2:10 am

    So I am guessing that means neither of you can name even one.

    We weren’t in Saudi Arabia to protect our interests. We were invited there to protect the Saudis from Saddam who was directly threatening them with invasion. So that comparisons sucks balls, too.

    The fact is that most of the places we are, we are wanted. That includes the war zones. Sure, there are Iraqis and Afghans who would like us to get the hell out. There are also Iraqis and Afghans who would prefer that we stay..at least for now.

    What pisses people off about our FP is not where we park our armies, its who we support with our $$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$. That is where the real problem lies.

    Pulling troops from places will save money we don’t have. But it won’t do shit for our foreign image. See it for what it is and take the good from that instead of trying to make an argument for something that it isn’t.

  • 215. Hucking Fypocrites  |  August 23, 2011 at 2:14 am

    “I know that from personal experience in Germany.”

    So you knew a majority of the German population? That’s mighty impressive.

  • 216. Hucking Fypocrites  |  August 23, 2011 at 2:20 am

    “We are perfectly fine letting China help bail us out of the debt that maintaining this “empire” has gotten us into….”

    I guess you haven’t been paying very much attention the last couple years.

    There is this group called the Tea Party. Ever heard of them?

    You see, the Tea Party is against our out-of-control spending that has forced us to continually have “China help bail us out.” They tried pretty hard to bring it to an end.

    And you and Rutherford have shit on them for their efforts the entire time. So save your fake outrage over borrowing Chinese money because neither of you is prepared to take the medicine needed to cure that illness.

  • 217. poolman  |  August 23, 2011 at 2:29 am

    No, Huck. And I did not infer that. I lived among the people of Germany in a farming community of around 800 people during the cold war and was privy to their feelings regarding our GI’s and bases occupying their nation. It was not anything that was publicly stated, though there were open anti-military demonstrations that took place. The media censored most of that during that time.

    This is timely regarding Japan…

    http://www.commondreams.org/headline/2010/01/30-5

  • 218. poolman  |  August 23, 2011 at 2:33 am

    Well Huck, I think Ron Paul was probably the originator of the tea party. Right now, he’s my candidate of choice. So when are you going to act on your ideals?

  • 219. poolman  |  August 23, 2011 at 2:41 am

    They tried pretty hard to bring it to an end.

    Are you referring to that political theater and posturing when it came time to raise the debt ceiling? I guess “trying pretty hard” doesn’t mean what it did when I was growing up. I guess they did what their masters wanted though. They got a classy vacation out of it. :roll:

  • 220. Hucking Fypocrites  |  August 23, 2011 at 2:49 am

    The real question is when are you going to start reading? I have already stated that Ron Paul is my current top choice. And I’m sorry, but I don’t have the power to decide when we hold elections.

    And I thought Fox News was the originator of the Tea Party….

    “I lived among the people of Germany in a farming community of around 800 people”

    So based on that you get this?

    “The people in many of these nations don’t want us there, even if their leaders claim they do. I know that from personal experience in Germany.”

    The opinion of 800 rural Germans is enough for you to declare that “the people” of Germany don’t want us there? Because you not only “inferred that,” you said it.

    I’d have thought that when discussing “the people” of a country that the sample size was more than 800. Even Gallup polls more people than that.

  • 221. Hucking Fypocrites  |  August 23, 2011 at 3:04 am

    Actually I am referring to the numerous spending bills that they tried to fight. Stuff like “stopgap” spending bills because democrats wouldn’t pass a budget and countless unemployment extensions that never worked as designed. You remember those, right?

    Poolman..are you prepared to give in to the Tea Party-proposed spending cuts so that we might be able to stop borrowing money from China? I have made it more than clear here over the past months that I am.

    For example, you haven’t heard me snivel once about the cuts that have and will force me to pay alot more for my education than what I was set to pay just a couple years ago. Starting next year, subsidized loans are history so that Pell Grants can continue. That’s going to cost me quite a bit. But it is what it is.

    What have you given up? What are you prepared to give up? What are you prepared to do to get us off China’s tit?

    Or is faux outrage the best we get?

  • 222. Hucking Fypocrites  |  August 23, 2011 at 3:30 am

    Poolman, you weren’t here back then. What was your position on the Stimulus?

    Ron Paul, like all other Tea Partiers, was vehemently against it.

  • 223. an800lbgorilla  |  August 23, 2011 at 5:19 am

    You can talk troop reductions all you want, the moment we start talking them those local communities go ape-shit because they know they are about to loose a TON of cash.

    Soldiers and sailors are many things, spend-thrift they are not…

  • 224. an800lbgorilla  |  August 23, 2011 at 8:33 am

    For Huck…

    http://www.dallasfed.org/news/speeches/fisher/2011/fs110817.cfm

  • 225. an800lbgorilla  |  August 23, 2011 at 8:34 am

    Again, for Huck, another interesting read on Texas jobs…

    http://www.texastribune.org/texas-taxes/2011-budget-shortfall/texas-added-jobs-july-unemployment-rose/

  • 226. an800lbgorilla  |  August 23, 2011 at 8:45 am

    Martin Luther King memorial made in China

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/asia/china/8715823/Martin-Luther-King-memorial-made-in-China.html

  • 227. Tex Taylor  |  August 23, 2011 at 10:17 am

    We don’t agree with their form of government or religion. From a moral perspective, they perform the most abortions and are the greatest perpetrators of infanticide that this planet has seen, yet we overlook all that in the name of capitalism, America’s true religion. Talk about outright hypocrisy!

    Can you imagine either the ignorance or the unmitigated gall, or both of calling his country hypocrites over abortion concerning another country, when this is the same man that the last six months signed a pledge of support for America’s biggest abortion provider at his gossip blog?

    Unbelievable…

  • 228. Tex Taylor  |  August 23, 2011 at 10:28 am

    Gorilla, can you remember the German town a few years back while Bush was President, that got wind we were going to be closing our surgical hospital, and went ape shit with fear of losing one of their biggest employers and best medical care?

    If I can find the video, I’ll put Poolman’s stupid assertions about Germany wanting us out of their country and protesting as much to bed pronto.

    Complete and utter baloney…and more lies.

  • 229. Tex Taylor  |  August 23, 2011 at 10:35 am

    Congratulations 2008 Obama Voter – Yes We Can!

    When Barack Obama took the oath of office twice on Jan. 20, 2009, CBS’ amazing number cruncher Mark Knoller reports, the national debt was $10,626,000,000,000.

    That means the debt that our federal government owes a whole lot of somebodies including China has increased $4,247,000,000,000 in just 945 days. That’s the fastest increase under any president ever.

    Remember the day the Democrat promised to close the embarrassing Guantanamo Bay Detention Facility within one year? That day the national debt increased $4,247,000,000. And each day since that the facility hasn’t been closed.

    Same for the day in 2009 when Obama flew all the way out to Denver to sign the $787 billion stimulus bill that was going to hold national unemployment beneath 8% instead of the 9.1% we got today anyway? Another $4,247,000,000 that day. And every day since, even Obama golfing and vacation days.

    Same sum for the day Obama flew Air Force One nearly four hours roundtrip to Columbus, Ohio for a 10-minute speech about how well the stimulus was working in the politically crucial Buckeye state. Ohio’s unemployment rate just jumped to 9% from 8.8% anyway.

    And Rutherford, you want to laugh at my statement Obama’s second win could send the country into ruin:?: For a math major, your skills obviously have eroded, or your mind has turned to lib mush.

    http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/washington/2011/08/obama-national-debt.html

  • 230. El Tigre  |  August 23, 2011 at 10:53 am

    I spent a lot of time in Germany.

    Poolman is entirely full of shit.

  • 231. an800lbgorilla  |  August 23, 2011 at 12:08 pm

    In light of the Made in China component to this (absurd, absolutely absurd), I just thought I’d toss out a couple more cents…

    WASHINGTON — The Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.’s family has charged the foundation building a monument to the civil-rights leader on the National Mall about $800,000 to use his words and image — and at least one scholar thinks that Dr. King would find such an arrangement offensive.

    The memorial is being paid for almost entirely through a fund-raising campaign led by the Martin Luther King Jr. National Memorial Project Foundation.

    “I don’t think the Jefferson family, the Lincoln family [or] any other group of family ancestors has been paid a licensing fee for a memorial in Washington,” said Cambridge University historian David Garrow, author of a Pulitzer Prize-winning biography of Dr. King. “. . . [He would've been] absolutely scandalized.”

    Financial documents revealed that the foundation paid $761,160 in 2007 to Intellectual Properties Management Inc., an entity run by the King family. They also showed that a $71,700 “management” fee was paid to the family estate in 2003.

  • 232. Rutherford  |  August 23, 2011 at 12:08 pm

    Martin Luther King memorial made in China

    Well G, at least China gets its chopsticks from us. :-)

    http://newsfeed.time.com/2011/06/04/import-irony-china-buys-its-chopsticks-from-a-small-georgia-town/

  • 233. Rutherford  |  August 23, 2011 at 12:22 pm

    And Rutherford, you want to laugh at my statement Obama’s second win could send the country into ruin:?:

    Funny, aren’t we spending a billion in Afghanistan per day? Or is it per week? I know it’s a lot. Nice place to start cutting if you ask me. ;-)

  • 234. Hucking Fypocrites  |  August 23, 2011 at 12:23 pm

    Thanks G.

  • 235. Tex Taylor  |  August 23, 2011 at 12:24 pm

    Well G, at least China gets its chopsticks from us.

    Yeah, and you forgot the the little toothpick carousels in the drinks too. I understand it’s a huge industry here in the U.S. :mad:

    That King story is tasteless – how crass can a family be?

    I vote we start charging Intellectual Properties Management Inc. an annual fee for each street and statue with King’s name or picture on it. If they don’t pay, take them down and rename the street to something more suited to the area.

    Though I’m not as smitten with King as most, as I think it more lionized by media than real facts, King was no doubt a great orator and great civil rights leader at the proper time. He deserves due.

    But this national groveling is about on par with people peeing in their pants at 2008 Obama campaign stumps. Almost embarrassing, as it resembles pandering.

    And this disgrace of his memory deserves an equally crass response. Just my two cents.

  • 236. Rutherford  |  August 23, 2011 at 12:25 pm

    G, yeah you are right … the King family getting paid for his memorial is offensive. Whatever happened to the honor of receiving a memorial being payment enough?

    We live in sick times.

  • 237. Rutherford  |  August 23, 2011 at 12:27 pm

    Regarding the presence of military bases helping the economies of communities, I find the logic a bit twisted. The fact that the military machine is big business should not be used to justify it. On the contrary, that’s part of the problem.

  • 238. Tex Taylor  |  August 23, 2011 at 12:28 pm

    Funny, aren’t we spending a billion in Afghanistan per day? Or is it per week? I know it’s a lot. Nice place to start cutting if you ask me.

    Not sure I disagree.

    But that $896MM figure Libya is bogus as all get out. We’ve flown 5,000 sorties, have CIA and special ops on the ground, and you want to tell me all we’ve spent is a billion bucks?

    I no more believe that, than I believe Iraq costs trillions.

  • 239. Tex Taylor  |  August 23, 2011 at 12:31 pm

    Rutherford, I again agree. But Germany is a poor example of what to close down. They act as triage points for our actions in the Middle East, and the benefit to Germany is a moot point. The biggest benefit is to us.

    Now if you want to talk the 38th parallel about cutting costs, well you got my attention. We’ve been there, for what now? Over 60 years?

  • 240. Rutherford  |  August 23, 2011 at 12:33 pm

    The stats concerning Texas job growth still reveal Perry to be a snake oil salesman. One of the articles posted by G, if I understand it correctly, suggests that public sector jobs were keeping TX afloat since once they were cut, unemployment rose … private sector job growth could not absorb the cuts in public.

    The bottom line is that Texas is hardly Xanadu economically. It’s hurting from this recession much like every other state. Perry’s claims to the contrary are smoke and mirrors.

  • 241. Rutherford  |  August 23, 2011 at 12:40 pm

    On a side note, I’d really like to know what skills assessment is given to television editors. I watched the Jon Huntsman interview by Jake Tapper that was on “This Week” on Sunday and I watched the pundits talk about how negative Huntsman was and how this strategy would not work.

    Then I watched “the web extra” where a much more well rounded Huntsman was presented and I had to ask myself who the hell edited the original interview for broadcast and decided the parts that made him look best should be put in the web extra?

    It’s either sloppy editing or media manipulation. :-(

  • 242. Alfie  |  August 23, 2011 at 12:44 pm

    Ron Pauls FP is short sighted and moronic as much as it is the passionate kool aid esque jizz for many.
    Neo isolationism seems great on the ledgers of money and feelings. It doesn’t work in the real world.
    Ron Paul is a crank,his failure has nothing to do with the MSM ignoring him. It is about the reality that deep down nobody likes him enough.

  • 243. Hucking Fypocrites  |  August 23, 2011 at 12:48 pm

    “The fact that the military machine is big business should not be used to justify it. ”

    And yet you and fellow democrats use that factor to justify any other government spending.

    “have CIA and special ops on the ground”

    Didn’t you hear, Tex? We don’t have any boots on the ground in Libya. ;)

    “One of the articles posted by G, if I understand it correctly, suggests that public sector jobs were keeping TX afloat since once they were cut,”

    Another one shows government growing at a greater percentage than all but 1 other sector from 2009 to 2011, which does not reflect a government that is shrinking or removing itself from the daily lives of Texans.

  • 244. El Tigre  |  August 23, 2011 at 12:55 pm

    “And yet you and fellow democrats use that factor to justify any other government spending.”

    AH, ah, ah, Huck. Food stamps are the road to recovery, remember? :roll:

  • 245. Hucking Fypocrites  |  August 23, 2011 at 12:55 pm

    “Ron Pauls FP is short sighted and moronic”

    By all means…expand.

    “Neo isolationism seems great on the ledgers of money and feelings. It doesn’t work in the real world.”

    Turn on the news and you’ll see how well our decades of neo-conservatism have worked. The only short-sightedness going on is in those who don’t see that our current FP has utterly failed and is unsustainable, maybe even in the relative short-term and certainly in the long haul.

  • 246. Alfie  |  August 23, 2011 at 1:09 pm

    “Ron Pauls FP is short sighted and moronic”

    By all means…expand.
    Sure. On Iran he gets applause on the points that Iran doesn’t have bombers that can reach us and that we started the war with them back with Operation Ajax. This was in retort to Santorums comment about ’79.
    Reality is that in the big kids world one must pick sides. We chose once not to allow communism,especially the Soviets to gain footholds worldwide. We later took a side against a theocracy.
    Today Iran doesn’t have bombers that can reach us. They do however have the means and desires for regional hegemony that would crush the West.
    Sitting at home without an opinion on the desires and actions of others is moronic,short sighted and Pauls prescription for the further disintegration of America.

  • 247. Alfie  |  August 23, 2011 at 1:10 pm

    Also it has to be said that the failure to act fully doesn’t mean the doctrines are wrong.

  • 248. Tex Taylor  |  August 23, 2011 at 1:43 pm

    Excellent points Alfie.

    I find it fascinating that there are people on this board, some with very good insights to domestic issues, can’t figure out why isolationism is a bad strategy – for no other reason than we are now in a global economy. Also, I would have thought WWII would have taught us that turning a blind eye doesn’t work.

    Before you do, you better come up with a very sound energy alternative, because you might end up destroying the economy in one fell swoop.

    Is anyone here really convinced that Allah and his 40 jihadists aren’t coming to America, whether Israel exists or not? Surely, we are not that naive?

  • 249. Hucking Fypocrites  |  August 23, 2011 at 1:45 pm

    “Also it has to be said that the failure to act fully doesn’t mean the doctrines are wrong.”

    Yeah that same excuse is used to explain why the Stimulus was a failure. I don’t buy either.

    I will also point out that “sitting at home” does not mean that people are “without an opinion” on those things. For example, we (finally) have an opinion on Syria, but we aren’t bombing or invading it.

    I find it interesting that few seem to accept that Iran might want a nuclear weapon for purely defensive reasons. Nuclear weapons have probably kept us out of Pakistan. They have probably kept us out of N. Korea. They have probably kept Pakistan out of India.

    Why wouldn’t an Iran that sees all of its non-nuclear neighbors being invaded and its nuclear neighbors not being invaded want to join that club?

    “We chose once not to allow communism,especially the Soviets to gain footholds worldwide.”

    And yet various forms of communism gained footholds worldwide and still exist today.

    “We later took a side against a theocracy.”

    And yet that particular theocracy still exists, and there is the real chance others might form.

    That doesn’t read as success to me.

  • 250. Hucking Fypocrites  |  August 23, 2011 at 1:49 pm

    “Is anyone here really convinced that Allah and his 40 jihadists aren’t coming to America, whether Israel exists or not? Surely, we are not that naive?”

    People were pretty convinced the Russians were coming, too.

  • 251. Hucking Fypocrites  |  August 23, 2011 at 1:55 pm

    “can’t figure out why isolationism is a bad strategy – for no other reason than we are now in a global economy”

    I don’t think anyone is arguing in favor of economic isolationism. As you pointed out, in today’s global economy that is literally not possible.

    That doesn’t really have anything to do with military isolationism unless we are talking about using our military assets to protect our business assets.

    And I don’t think you really want to go there.

  • 252. Hucking Fypocrites  |  August 23, 2011 at 2:07 pm

    Other than a potentially misinterpreted comment by an Iranian politician who has absolutely no say in its military actions, what indications has Iran given that it plans on direct military action against anyone?

    I am not talking about proxy wars. I am talking about direct aggression outside its borders. Other than recent raids into the Kurdish areas of Iraq, I can’t think of any. And since they cite defense against terrorist factions as the reason for that, it’s kind of hard to condemn it. We do the same and support others who do it, too.

    Iran has a history of paranoid style of politics and for good reason as Paul points out. I think the world would find that if it were awarded fair play, we’d see a much more cooperative Iran. I think Ron Paul is the only one that is using foresight on that.

  • 253. Tex Taylor  |  August 23, 2011 at 3:13 pm

    And I don’t think you really want to go there.

    We already did. It was called the Gulf War and I can assure you we would do it again in a heartbeat… And for no other reasons than simply economic, until we have an independent energy policy, we will continue to go to war to protect “our assets.”

    Hard to believe Huck than you don’t recognize most of the world’s terrorism runs through or affiliated with Tehran.

    http://www.theisraelproject.org/site/c.hsJPK0PIJpH/b.2486101/k.AD22/Iran_Breakdown_of_Financial_Backing_for_Terrorist_Groups.htm

    Now don’t be a “Poolman” and attack the source before looking at their Board of Directors. Poolman will have this defined as some Zionist conspiracy, but this is actually a small part of our American intelligence.

  • 254. Tex Taylor  |  August 23, 2011 at 3:17 pm

    I think the world would find that if it were awarded fair play, we’d see a much more cooperative Iran.

    I think we already have a much more cooperative Iran, and the Obama Administration refuses to have the guts to back it. It’s possible we could have pushed the tyrannical leadership out if we had acted even two years ago, including open backing of the Green Party.

    But it would be hard for even you to deny the leadership of Iran is both corrupt and ruthless, including the military.

  • 255. Rutherford  |  August 23, 2011 at 3:25 pm

    This from the prior thread but I had to toss in my two cents:

    By chance, do any of my comrades here know how this Democratic talking point statistic is derived?

    The statement goes something like this, and I have heard it a hundred times now. This is but one of dozens of examples:

    According to Obama administration Ag Secretary Tom Vilsack, food stamps are good for the economy. According to Vilsack, for every $1.00 spent on food stamps we see $1.84 in production.

    When I heard this statistic I assumed it meant that food stamps maintain demand. In other words, folks with food stamps BUY food making food manufacturers and sellers richer. Folks without, starve themselves nutritionally and starve the the system economically.

    Can someone tell me why this would not be true?

  • 256. Tex Taylor  |  August 23, 2011 at 3:27 pm

    Dem Congresswoman Blames Black Unemployment On “Racism”

    Take a look at this idiot. And you wonder why there’s 40% unemployment rate, when this is what they call “representative”? I’ll bet her IQ isn’t 75.

    http://www.realclearpolitics.com/video/2011/08/23/dem_congresswoman_blames_black_unemployment_on_racism-comments.html
    :lol: :lol: :lol:

    What a disservice these racist pimps living off the backs of some of society’s most tragic cases have done to their communities. There are no more disgraceful people on earth IMO. These race hustlers have failed their country, they have failed their families, they have failed their children and grandchildren.

    If there is justice this side of heaven, they will drop dead.

  • 257. Tex Taylor  |  August 23, 2011 at 3:33 pm

    When I heard this statistic I assumed it meant that food stamps maintain demand. In other words, folks with food stamps BUY food making food manufacturers and sellers richer. Folks without, starve themselves nutritionally and starve the the system economically.

    Can someone tell me why this would not be true?

    I will be more than happy to point out why this is utter and complete B.S., when you can point me to where the production of subsidized milk and cheese, or other consumer staples has an 84% mark up to the system. :wink:

    If you can’t figure out how bogus this is, which by the way, my question was completely rhetorical, then I can’t help you. But I’ll tell you one thing for sure. You don’t understand the words snake oil or snow job.

    Folks without, starve themselves nutritionally and starve the the system economically.

    How? This is like telling me having illegitimate children to feed is economically a boon to a family and society.

  • 258. Rutherford  |  August 23, 2011 at 3:51 pm

    Sorry I’m getting to these so late … another from the prior thread from Muffy:

    The man or woman we elect needs to be balanced, and IMO – Christian does not automatically equate to unbalanced.

    Of course Christian does not equate to unbalanced. Every President we have had from 1789 on professed a belief in Christianity. Unbalanced Christian equates to unbalanced Christian :lol: and Bachmann and Perry are unbalanced Christians … Bachmann in particular who actually gets specific guidance from the Almighty.

  • 259. El Tigre  |  August 23, 2011 at 3:53 pm

    R, are you familiar with the broken window parable? If not, look it up. I think it addresses your ultimate inquiry.

    Someone other than the consumer has to pay. Those dollars aren’t being spent elsewhere.

    In other words, there’s no “starving the system” economically when it’s a net loss.

  • 260. Rutherford  |  August 23, 2011 at 4:01 pm

    Just one more from the prior thread because Pfesser deserves a shout-out:

    “Someone who believes that a guy fathered himself in order to send himself to earth in order to kill himself in order to appease himself for the very sins to which he himself convicted mankind as retribution for having fallen for a trick effected through the agency of a TALKING SNAKE doesn’t get to call other people’s beliefs “ridiculous”.”

    Damn was that a money quote Pfesser! And Tex, with sincere apologies to you … even you have to admit that one sentence captures the absurdity that non-believers find in religion. You might not agree … in fact of course you don’t agree … but you have to hand it to whomever came up with that quote that they succinctly captured the oddness of religion to the uninitiated.

  • 261. Rutherford  |  August 23, 2011 at 4:08 pm

    I’m just wondering how you are going to answer when you stand before Him and suddenly realize everything you were, are and will ever be was due only to Him – and you denied His very existence. But one thing I am absolutely sure – you won’t be defiant and rebellious.

    Ok I know I’m probably pissing people off by addressing prior thread stuff here but I’m in catch up mode and some of this stuff is too good to ignore.

    No Tex, I won’t be defiant or rebellious. Once my stomach stops turning (because I’m quite sure the sight of God will scare the sh*t out of me), I’ll ask Him for a sit-down and ask Him to explain to me how the hell He does what He does. The only shame will be that I can’t come back to Earth to explain it to Huck and Pfesser. :-)

  • 262. Rutherford  |  August 23, 2011 at 4:27 pm

    From Felonious (paraphrase): “Everybody so excited we got a black President. Well you actin’ like one B. Pay your f*ckin’ bills on time.”

    That was from Tigre … I must admit that was CLASSIC.

  • 263. poolman  |  August 23, 2011 at 4:36 pm

    Wow, you guys have been busy while I was out. I got through some of the comments so far. Here is responses to Huck. Not maybe I can get through some more…

    The real question is when are you going to start reading? I have already stated that Ron Paul is my current top choice.

    Sorry, Huck. I see you are kind of advocating supporting Ron Paul in your comment at 164, though still undecided. It appears if he isn’t the republican choice you won’t. I can pretty much guaranty he won’t be, since they favor neocons, which he is definitely not.

    And I thought Fox News was the originator of the Tea Party….

    No, but they certainly have hijacked it, along with the Dick Armey and Koch brothers. I was talking about when it actually was a grassroots movement. Pre-astroturf phase.

    What was your position on the Stimulus?

    I was not for the stimulus at the time, believing the economy better stimulated from the bottom up. I had people tell me I was crazy thinking we should give money directly to tax payers. I even had it worked out equitably among all tax paying Americans, advocating a percentage of taxes already paid in over a lifetime offered as a rebate to the citizens. But eventually trusted the BS Obama was telling us. Now that I know better, I think it was a mistake. Most say it wasn’t enough. I say trickle down is a bogus concept.

    I was never for the bank bailout or the bailout of GM. “Too big to fail” is piss poor economic and business practice. I actually wish they were allowed to fail. Real business has to deal with the event of failure due to poor decisions and practices. The size of a company should not change the dynamics.

    AFA my opinion of the folks in Germany not wanting us there, let me attempt to clarify, since I apparently did not explain well enough. The people loved Americans and our American culture in those years. What they did not like was our physical presence in their country and the way we operated with impunity. The GI’s, for the most part were arrogant and ignorant of the local culture and traditions. There was much discussion of how they just wanted to fuck the local women and introduce them to drugs.

    Admittedly, many of the girls were looking to land an American and thereby escape their perceived “dull” lives. The older generation would have much preferred our soldiers to stay on base and quit “corrupting” and polluting their land and youth.

  • 264. poolman  |  August 23, 2011 at 4:48 pm

    I find it fascinating that there are people on this board, some with very good insights to domestic issues, can’t figure out why isolationism is a bad strategy – for no other reason than we are now in a global economy. Also, I would have thought WWII would have taught us that turning a blind eye doesn’t work.

    Isolationism and self-sufficiency are not one in the same. Just because we have a global economy doesn’t mean we should depend on the globe to provide our goods and services. We had better be able to survive in community without the need of global support. There would have been more survivors of the Titanic if there were adequate life boats. But of course, everyone swore it could never sink.

    If you check the facts that are now public, we allowed Japan to attack Pearl Harbor to get us into the war. It was primarily for economic purpose, and more about wool being pulled over our eyes than turning a blind eye.

  • 265. Tex Taylor  |  August 23, 2011 at 5:27 pm

    Just because we have a global economy doesn’t mean we should depend on the globe to provide our goods and services.

    Well, that would be super if we could be self-sufficient. Of course, that assumes we have every natural resource necessary – including the raw materials. We don’t.

    Which part of your bulldozer do you wish to forgo? How about the aluminum in your engine block, or the stainless steel in the hydraulics? Both raw materials are imported to the largest degree.

  • 266. Tex Taylor  |  August 23, 2011 at 5:29 pm

    If you check the facts that are now public, we allowed Japan to attack Pearl Harbor to get us into the war. It was primarily for economic purpose, and more about wool being pulled over our eyes than turning a blind eye.

    :lol: So this hasn’t been a recent phenomenon, hey? First Pearl Harbor, and then the Towers. I see. Poolman, you should run for office. I would love to see who would crawl out of the woodwork to support your campaign.

  • 267. Tex Taylor  |  August 23, 2011 at 5:56 pm

    I’ll ask Him for a sit-down and ask Him to explain to me how the hell He does what He does.

    I don’t even know why I bother. You delight in foolishness. And of all the dumb things you do, and even reading here they are many, it’s far and away the most foolish thing you do. And I have really never understood what you think it is going to buy you? If it is to offend me, well okay. But what I think is not terribly important.

    After some recent thought, I’m actually comforted by the fact that I’m now personally meeting resistance. I recognize it is a necessity from you and millions like you. And as strange as that may sound to you, it actually affirms what I know and believe. :neutral:

    —-

    But if there is a conversation, I feel safe saying the conversation will go something along the lines of what Job experienced in Job 38-42, and he was a far more righteous man than you. You might want to look that up some time.

    Isaiah called himself a man of unclean lips, David laid in the prostrate position. So did Moses, and Paul, and Jeremiah and hundreds of others. All men that are recorded in history and are history. And if history’s most important were floored, what do you think insignificant people like you and me will think?

    ————-

    But if you understand Christ is simply God manifested in human flesh, that this is God giving of Himself, you realize John 3:16 very well answers the twisting by Pfesser and other fools, that the snake simply allegory of Satan, and that true love requires free will. It also gives an indicator of just how clever your opponent is and the false promises – far more clever than you will ever be, or me, or Pfesser, or any other person who ever walked the face of this earth. Matter of fact, thousands of years ago, the very same verses give testimony to exactly what would happen. This is not something to be trivialized.

    I think when I talk to you anymore about this, I can’t help but think back to Jim Dougan. And it saddens me because I always liked you both, and probably will continue to like you until the end of my days. I even respect(ed) you both to some degree for your talents and your friendship, so what I really feel is somewhat of a failure in that I can’t seem to convince you there is more than meets the eye to this life. We are not here by accident or technicality. We are here for a reason.

    In fact, if you had any perception at all, you would realize at this very minute and today that the age of grace is quickly escalating to a climax. For people like me, it is palpable. It’s easily demonstrated this was all predicted.

    But if you are foolish enough to believe pitiful little man can control his elements and understand all things, and that we live out our lives without much purpose for a certain number of years before death and that is all there is, then you’ll have to deal with it when the time comes.

    One thing for sure that even the atheists can’t deny – that time will come. I am in no way trying to scare you. I’m simply pointing out the undeniability of our finite nature, and perhaps a hint you need for you to be absolutely sure of yourself.

  • 268. Rutherford  |  August 23, 2011 at 6:55 pm

    Sometimes being a blog owner, you get some weird-ass sh*t in your in-basket.

    While I have no intention of approving the comment I just got from thegods@arehypocrtitecunts.com (I kid you not), I just had to share excerpts of it with you guys. This is not your run of the mill SPAM. It also makes me wonder if the poor dude needs a shrink. This was an attempted comment on my Bob Gates post of a few months ago. The author goes by the name of “If you care you could offer me that white trash’s life for disposal” (again, I kid you not). For your entertainment:

    THE WOMEN IN YOUR FAMILY ARE YOUR “HOLY PEOPLE”!!! THEY ARE YOUR INTERFACE WITH THE GODS!!!
    Their role throughout history is to communicate the god’s wisdom so the entire family can progress when reincarnated. Effectively acomplishing this task may buy them a quality opportunity to ascend in their next life. …

    The Prince of Darkness, battling the gods over the souls of the Damned.
    It is the gods who have created this environment and led people into Damnation with temptation. The god’s positioning proves they work to prevent people’s understanding.
    How often is xtian dogma wrong? Expect it is about the Lucifer issue as well.
    The fallen god, fighting for justice for the disfavored, banished to Earth as the fallen angel?
    I believe much as the Noah’s Flood event, the end of the world will be initiated by revelry among the people. It will be positioned to be sanctioned by the gods and led for “1000 years with Jesus on Earth”.
    In light of modern developments this can entail many pleasures:::Medicine “cures” aging, the “manufacture” of incredible beauty via cloning as sex slaves, free (synthetic) cocaine, etc.
    Somewhere during the 1000 years the party will start to “die off”, literally. Only those who maintain chaste, pure lifestyles, resisting these temptations, will survive the 1000 years. Condemned to experience another epoch of planet’s history for their ignorant pursuit of xtianity, they will be the candidates used to (re)colonize (the next) Planet Earth, condemned to relive the misery experienced by the peasantry during history due to their failure to ascend into heaven before the Apocalypse. …
    Navy SEALS helpcopter crash of 8.6.11 was revenge for Osama bin Laden.
    So confident in their relationship with the gods. Live in comfort in “the greatest country in the world”, bright future, kids do great.
    The gods have sent a very contradicting clue to the families of the 20 Navy SEALS killed in Afghanistan.
    The gods did this to you. This is punishment for the evil of your country, killing of a superior in the god’s eyes.
    Do you even pray? Have the gods already told you to stop going to church? Because Muslims pray 7 times a day, and you fucking white trash ridicule their favor.
    You fell for it. And now you will pay dearly. The United States is the empire of evil.
    The clue has been sent. Let’s see what you do with it.
    Even with all the corruption of the Republicans this wasn’t going to happen on W’s watch because the conservatives are the good ones. It is the liberal social decay which was the trademark of The Beast, and what has primarily destroyed our favor with the gods.
    One day default will bring insolvency, while the wealthy you bailed out with multi-trillion dollar stimulous package leaves you behind in the ruins. When this day comes don’t forget to pray, for the economic devestation and carnage which will surround you will be a deliberate motivator.

    And that was just a small portion of his (her?) rant.

    Sometimes being a blog owner can be scary folks! :neutral:

  • 269. Tex Taylor  |  August 23, 2011 at 6:57 pm

    By the way – in my response to Poolman, I should have included chromium as the imported material – I meant to add that to the sentence stainless steel.

  • 270. El Tigre  |  August 23, 2011 at 7:14 pm

    “And that was just a small portion of his (her?) rant.”

    Oh, there was more. I hit send too quickly.

  • 271. Tex Taylor  |  August 23, 2011 at 7:18 pm

    Part Poolman, part Pfesser, part Tex and BIC? :lol: I was having a hard time following – that dude jumps faster than I do. And I thought I had ADHD? I guess I’m surrounded by the divine since I’m the only one in the family with a penie.

    I was tempted to send an email for further explanation, but I thought the better of it.

  • 272. poolman  |  August 23, 2011 at 7:38 pm

    That doesn’t really have anything to do with military isolationism unless we are talking about using our military assets to protect our business assets.

    That is exactly what we have been doing for decades.

    I spent 33 years and four months in active military service and during that period I spent most of my time as a high class thug for Big Business, for Wall Street and the bankers. In short, I was a racketeer, a gangster for capitalism. I helped make Mexico and especially Tampico safe for American oil interests in 1914. I helped make Haiti and Cuba a decent place for the National City Bank boys to collect revenues in. I helped in the raping of half a dozen Central American republics for the benefit of Wall Street. I helped purify Nicaragua for the International Banking House of Brown Brothers in 1902–1912. I brought light to the Dominican Republic for the American sugar interests in 1916. I helped make Honduras right for the American fruit companies in 1903. In China in 1927 I helped see to it that Standard Oil went on its way unmolested. Looking back on it, I might have given Al Capone a few hints. The best he could do was to operate his racket in three districts. I operated on three continents.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Smedley_Butler

    And I don’t think you really want to go there.

    I’ve been going there since I have been on this blog. Now there is a lot more evidence available to support that truth.

  • 273. Alfie  |  August 23, 2011 at 8:08 pm

    And yet various forms of communism gained footholds worldwide and still exist today.
    Really???? I’m not trying to move goal posts but seeing as I specified the Soviets and their type of communism I think I’m in the right here. So at best that would loosely leave Cuba which I really have to stress loose since Cuba was a puppet at best.
    Lets be clear why I specify the Soviets. The Soviets clearly engaged in international aggression so as to spread ITS influence.

  • 274. Alfie  |  August 23, 2011 at 8:12 pm

    I disagree with you that WE have a position on Syria. If it matters since my opinion and views are what I have in opposition to Paul et al I’ll offer mine.
    I think we should be hands off Syria as long as they stay away from Lebanon. I support discussions between Israel and Syria regards the Golan Heights. Otherwise I ignore Syria. My top 2 nations in the region are Turkey and Iran. Turkey is hands down #1.

  • 275. poolman  |  August 23, 2011 at 8:15 pm

    So this hasn’t been a recent phenomenon, hey? First Pearl Harbor, and then the Towers.

    FDR knew Pearl Harbor was going to happen and let it. It was our way of getting into WWII, since the American people had no desire to get involved. They needed a “catastrophic event” to get the people behind the effort.

    It is well-documented and now public knowledge that we had broken the Japanese code, though Japan did not know we had. We provoked and “lured” them to attack us. Google it. Obviously you don’t want to believe it, along with much of the rest of the American sheeple. Ignorance is no excuse, anymore, if it ever was. :neutral: FOIA – use it or lose it!

  • 276. Alfie  |  August 23, 2011 at 8:16 pm

    If you are the same guy as the former Red Pill,sorry if you are not I always thought you were, YOU should recall I fully support Iran joining the nuclear club.
    See September 2007 FRAY

  • 277. Tex Taylor  |  August 23, 2011 at 8:16 pm

    I found out something pretty cool tonight. I was watching the local news while standing doing dishes, or something unimportant. Then I heard a name I hadn’t heard in 30 years – my former college roommate. And it was my fault I had lost track of him, as I bailed out of this rotten fraternity my junior year and never went back, and didn’t bother to stay in contact because I thought I was in love.

    I just found out that he (now retired) is the most decorated naval fighter pilot since Vietnam. Is that cool, or what? Last I knew, he was a geo scientist leaving college. Somewhere, he must have decided to become a pilot – and undoubtedly, a pretty damn good one.

    Who says Oklahoma is backwards? Shiite, we roll out the big guns.

  • 278. Tex Taylor  |  August 23, 2011 at 8:21 pm

    Poolman,

    So Bush egged on the Arabs to attack the Towers too, with prior knowledge? Or did he schedule the attack with all of this neocon friends and plan the Building 7 demolition, with perfect timing of the planes hitting the buildings?

    These double secret probation conspiracy theories get me entirely confused.

  • 279. Alfie  |  August 23, 2011 at 8:43 pm

    …though Japan did not know we had. We provoked and “lured” them to attack us.
    Yeah because if they KNEW we had any idea they were going to attack they would’ve chosen not to.
    Of course our knowledge consisted of knowing Japanese aggression was forthcoming.
    Yeah we lured them,dirty Yankee fuckers. We sided with Allies and boycotted oil exports to the Imperial War Machine. THAT did indeed piss them off.

  • 280. poolman  |  August 23, 2011 at 9:16 pm

    So Bush egged on the Arabs to attack the Towers too, with prior knowledge?

    A “catastrophic event” akin to Pearl Harbor (as described in the neocon’s PNAC documents) was needed to gain the public’s support for war and advancing our empire in the middle east. That accurately describes the events of 9-11. Coincidence or miracle? It did, after all, bring about the desired results they describe.

    Of course, you believe 19 Arabs with box-cutters got the best of us. Not just our superior military and intelligence, but also those of the Israeli firms that provided the security for the WTC and the airports involved.

    With that “knowledge”, I’m surprised you feel we need ANY military or intelligence budget, since it was essentially worthless against these “primitive” tactics.

    It must have been Allah’s will. Look at what amazing modern miracles it hath wrought – not only changes in the known laws of physics, but also the greatest collection of first-evers, coincidences, and the speediest detective work the world has ever seen. :roll:

  • 281. poolman  |  August 23, 2011 at 9:24 pm

    Yeah we lured them,dirty Yankee fuckers.

    Hey Alfie, suck on this…

    http://www.independent.org/newsroom/article.asp?id=408

  • 282. Alfie  |  August 23, 2011 at 9:37 pm

    Hey Poolman your link proves nothing. The rise of Imperial Japan is based in a lot more reality than fits inside one douchebags easily refuted novel.
    You see this is why I agreed with Rabbit in the previous thread. You falsely believe you are part of the solution to all that is wrong with America,even the world. In fact you as a conspiracy loon are the perfect tool for those that are indeed in the shadows.
    You see false boogeymen and other times those things put into play just for your type and scream from the roof tops,or more often the basements lined with aluminum foil. All the while you miss reality and those blowing the smoke laugh at you much louder than the rest of us do. In the end everyone laughs at you,suck on that.

  • 283. pfesser53  |  August 23, 2011 at 9:51 pm

    Quoting the bible to make a point is pointless. What do you think it is going to say, “I am wrong?”

    Well, now that I think of it, it actually it does that, doesn’t it? Direct contradiction after contradiction. Over and over. I guess that’s how one can use that which is no more than a book of Jewish fables to “prove” just about anything. A pretty pissy excuse for a holy book. Now the Gita – there’s a cool book!

    Tell me about that talking snake again. I like that one…

  • 284. Tex Taylor  |  August 23, 2011 at 10:48 pm

    Pfesser,

    Direct contradiction after contradiction. Over and over. I guess that’s how one can use that which is no more than a book of Jewish fables to “prove” just about anything.

    What are you so bitter about old man? Some priest molest you? Somebody old coot tell you that you were going to hell as a kid when your mom dragged you to church? Maybe sideways with believing members of the family and that just burns your ass?

    For a book of fairy tales, the Bible certainly does occupy a great deal of your time. I actually read an editorial today just for you. And I suddenly realized reading it, you’re about as crazy as Poolman, only a million times more vile:

    Now the heroes of the tea party movement, it turns out, are also closet theocrats. “If you want to understand Michele Bachmann and Rick Perry,” argues Michelle Goldberg in Newsweek/Daily Beast, “understanding Dominionism isn’t optional.” A recent New Yorker profile by Ryan Lizza contends that Bachmann has been influenced by a variety of theocratic thinkers who have preached Christian holy war.

    As befits a shadowy religious sect, its followers go under a variety of names: Reconstructionists, Theonomists. The New Apostolic Reformation. Republicans. All apparently share a belief, in Goldberg’s words, that “Christians have a God-given right to rule all earthly institutions.”

    The Dominionist goal is the imposition of a Christian version of Shariah law in which adulterers, homosexuals and perhaps recalcitrant children would be subject to capital punishment. It is enough to spoil the sleep of any subscriber to The New Yorker. But there is a problem: Dominionism, though possessing cosmic ambitions, is a movement that could fit in a phone booth. The followers of R.J. Rushdoony produce more books than converts.

    So it becomes necessary to stretch the case a bit. Perry admittedly doesn’t attend a Dominionist church, or make Dominionist arguments, but he once allowed himself to be prayed for by some suspicious characters. Bachmann once attended a school that had a law review that said some disturbing things. She assisted a professor who once spoke at a convention that included some alarming people. Her belief that federal tax rates should not be higher than 10 percent, Goldberg explains, is “common in Reconstructionist circles.”

    Tea Party Holy War

    http://www.realclearpolitics.com/articles/2011/08/23/tea_party_holy_war_111052.html

    But I’ll challenge you to provide one contradiction and I’ll bet serious money on this board here with Rutherford acting as broker you don’t know a damn thing about those “Jewish fables” more than what the humanist circles parrot. I think your knowledge concerning Christianity is about as profound as those Dominionist Arctic bloggers I read – and they read like parody. :wink:

  • 285. Tex Taylor  |  August 23, 2011 at 10:59 pm

    Thank you Alfie. You summed ‘The Poolman’ beautifully. Rabbit, as always, sniffed the bullshit before anyone. I should have told him as much on the last thread.

    You see this is why I agreed with Rabbit in the previous thread. You falsely believe you are part of the solution to all that is wrong with America,even the world. In fact you as a conspiracy loon are the perfect tool for those that are indeed in the shadows.

    I once asked Poolman, who is kind of the wacky Christian ying to Pfesser’s militant atheism yang about, “okay, you’ve criticized both America and the religion you profess to believe. Name one living Christian who you believe best represents Christ. Surely there is somebody I could learn from.”

    Silence. Or no suggestion.

    I actually have learned a lot from internet blogging – it’s interesting to see the personalities that make up America and how shallow much of the citizenry’s thinking. And I no longer wonder why we are left with Presidential candidates so unqualified as Barack Obama and John McCain – the latter infinitely more qualified than the former and even between two weak candidates, we managed to choose the weakest.

    It’s a wonder we aren’t in worse trouble.

  • 286. El Tigre  |  August 23, 2011 at 11:02 pm

    Hellooooooo. . . “Perry once allowed himself to be prayed for by some suspicious characters.”

    Dominionism : 1
    Humanity: 0

  • 287. Rutherford  |  August 24, 2011 at 12:52 am

    I was tempted to send an email for further explanation, but I thought the better of it.

    I considered not sharing the email address and didn’t think better of it. I never know how seriously to take mofo’s like that.

    I encountered a blog a couple of years ago where the author was writing some very ominous threatening stuff. I sent him a comment foolishly thinking I could steer him in a different direction. He told me to go to hell. I stopped visiting his blog … too scary. Don’t know if he ever made good on his threats. The Internet is an amazing thing but it’s equally terrifying if you accidentally “walk into the wrong neighborhood”.

  • 288. Rutherford  |  August 24, 2011 at 1:03 am

    Of course, you believe 19 Arabs with box-cutters got the best of us.

    Poolman, when stated like that it does seem absurd but you need to reorient your thinking. The “success” of those 19 Arabs was in direct proportion to our gross incompetence. I don’t mean simply blaming Bush. I mean stupidity from start to finish … having a strange dude in your flight training class who is more focused on flying than landing. That’s just one example. I think there were many opportunities along the way to prevent 9/11 by both our government and ordinary people. Everyone dropped the ball. That is indeed the only way 19 Arabs with box cutters could kill 3000+ people.

    There was a dude working at Logan who later said that he had a really bad feeling about one of the guys who turned out to be among the 19 (maybe Atta, I’m not sure). Can you imagine how that guy must feel today? How will he ever shrug that off? He was human, he didn’t trust his gut. It contributed to catastrophe. I submit his case was just one of many.

    That’s how 19 Arabs with box cutters got the best of us.

  • 289. Rutherford  |  August 24, 2011 at 1:09 am

    Name one living Christian who you believe best represents Christ. Surely there is somebody I could learn from.

    I’ll be damned if I remember who, but I’m pretty sure Poolman did provide you with a name or two.

  • 290. Rutherford  |  August 24, 2011 at 1:11 am

    I finally heard Perry castigated on MSNBC today for something I find totally bogus. I may write a blog post about it tomorrow. ;-) ( Hint: it involves supposed racial insensitivity.

  • 291. Rutherford  |  August 24, 2011 at 1:14 am

    Tex sometimes you surprise me. I really was not trying to offend with what perhaps was too flippant an answer concerning my eventual meetup with the Almighty. Seriously, when you meet your maker, don’t you have any questions for Him? You have admitted that despite being devout, you don’t have all the answers. I think the world is sufficiently f*cked up that an interview with God, if given the chance, would be essential to anyone having half a brain.

  • 292. Rutherford  |  August 24, 2011 at 1:17 am

    TMOT expressing the same frustration I have with corporate America. His prescription perhaps too simplistic but he has his finger on the primary thing ailing our economy … out of control greed.

  • 293. Hucking Fypocrites  |  August 24, 2011 at 1:34 am

  • 294. Hucking Fypocrites  |  August 24, 2011 at 1:35 am

    That was supposed to show a video not a link :/

  • 295. poolman  |  August 24, 2011 at 2:34 am

    one douchebags easily refuted novel.

    I see you and Tex attended the same school of (non)debate. “If you don’t like what you read or it opposes your POV, lambaste ‘em!”

    Robert B. Stinnett is a former American sailor who earned ten battle stars and a Presidential Unit Citation. – Wikipedia.

    Alfie, you’re on the government’s dole, too, I take it.

    Hell, even the sanitized Wikipedia provides enough proof to show FDR manipulated things to get us into war with Germany via Japan. Don’t just go by one “douchebag’s” account. It seems there’s plenty affirming his information – even Admirals and Generals.

    Aside from all the documents that were destroyed, there are still classified and redacted documents that have not been released, even after this many years, and despite FOIA requests.

    What or who do you suppose they’re protecting? Oh right. That’s just so “you as a conspiracy loon are the perfect tool for those that are indeed in the shadows.” Who then are those you describe as “in the shadows”?

  • 296. poolman  |  August 24, 2011 at 2:39 am

    The “success” of those 19 Arabs was in direct proportion to our gross incompetence.

    Let’s assume for a minute that is the case. You would logically think someone would have been demoted, fired, or reprimanded. Instead many got promotions.

  • 297. MuffyMcD  |  August 24, 2011 at 2:54 am

    I graduated from college – in Rhode Island – in the early 90s and recently returned to school here – in Chicago – to get my Masters. Excellent schools, both. Not easy to get into, either. In between degrees, I worked – in Seattle – at Microsoft. I’ve always made good grades, and I was good at my job at MS as well. Even so, for the most part I have always been surrounded by people much, much smarter than me. And much more liberal, as you might have guessed from the cities listed.

    One fellow in particular from way back when, Louis, stands out in my memory. Louis was in possession of a great big brain, which he nurtured and expanded – first at Brown, then Harvard. Louis didn’t believe in God, which didn’t surprise me. Most of the people I came across were more open to aliens than to the existence of God, and the name Jesus usually brought a slight, patronizing smile to Louis’ lips. I quickly tired of his clever “questions” and he contentedly rambled over other parts of the casual conversation landscape until eventually I moved away and we drifted apart.

    Some years later I learned that Louis had come to know Christ.

    Your posts on the existence and character of God bewilder and sometimes grieve me, Rutherford. You inquire and you counter, and engage Tex and the others on a subject you don’t appear to understand or be in possession of – faith in God. You sound just like Louis when he would try and outsmart faith. Do you still not understand free will?

    You lift corrosive passages up for praise and make light of the painstaking replies to your obfuscation that are repeated time and again for your benefit without so much as a thank you for the effort. Your preferred wingman is the very definition of carnal, and you can’t fully understand what you don’t know in the first place. Are you truly confounded? Are you genuinely seeking? Or is this folly for you? I can assure you that it isn’t for your adversaries. You don’t even recognize your true adversaries as such. It even baffles me why you allow and even encourage these discussions if your mind and heart are clear on this.

    I’m tired now after a long day, but I carried your earlier posts with me for a while afterwards, and reading Tex’s #267 just now made me feel like telling about Louis.

    Tex, thank you. And thank you to the others who bother.

    “Seriously, when you meet your maker, don’t you have any questions for Him?

    Yeah. The same questions I ask Him now. How can you forgive us for what we have done to each other? How do you not give up on us? To which He would only need to remind me one last time that He so loved the world that He gave His only begotten Son, so that whoever believes in Him shall not perish, but have eternal life.

  • 298. pfesser53  |  August 24, 2011 at 4:59 am

    Rutherford –

    I can think of some questions for the Imaginary Friend:

    1 – Why do you make humans fallible and then torture them forever because they failed due to your own incompetence? Why don’t you just make them good? (Yeah, yeah – free will and all that bullshit)

    2 – Why you, all-powerful and the be-all of everything, require humans to worship you? Are you really that insecure?

    3 – Why do you, omniscient and omnipotent, allow evil? Because if you don’t foretell it, you are not omniscient. If you see it and can do nothing, you are not omnipotent. If you can do both and do nothing, you are evil. (Or perhaps don’t exist – nah, couldn’t be THAT.)

    4 – Why do you play games? Why not just show yourself and then the game is over and we can all get down to some serious god-worshipping? Why go through all this time-wasting and mental masturbation?

    5 – What about those pesky 200 or so OTHER gods that all those mean, no-good, stupid people believe in? How do I know that you are the ONE?

    6 – Why is it that under ordinary circumstances evil people may do evil or good, good people only do good, but for good people to do evil it takes religion? Doesn’t that kind of negate all the propaganda?

    7 – Since the Jews are your Chosen People, why did you let the Krauts kill 6m of them? Kinda had your eye off the ball there, didn’t you, Big Guy?

    8 – WTF happened here? Trying to make a chicken in your room, huh?

    9 – What is the deal about that fucking talking snake?

    10 – How come every time you get pissed off, you go around smiting people instead of just stepping in to fix the problem? And while I’m thinking about it, since water seeks its own level, where did that water eventually go that covered the whole planet when you smote everybody’s asses? (Oh, I forgot – the earth was flat then, so it just drained off the edge, right?)

    11 – How did you get all those bones and fossils in exactly the right layers under the ground to support an alternate theory of human generation called “evolution?” Must have been a lot of work! And they say you have no sense of humour, you madcap, you! All that work, just to fool us! Heheeeeeeeee…..

    12 – How do you get those radionuclides to decay at different rates during different times (which physics says is impossible), in order to fool us into thinking the earth is 6,000 years old?

    13 – What is the deal about that fucking talking snake?

    This is fun! Let’s do some more!

  • 299. pfesser53  |  August 24, 2011 at 5:16 am

    Rutherford –

    I have a new conservative hero – Barry Goldwater. I had never thought much about him since the ‘sixties but at the recommendation of a friend I bought his book, “Conscience of a Conservative” for my Kindle. OMG, I had no idea he was such a thinker! I’m having a tough time digesting all his ideas; he is so succinct that to ignore a single sentence is to miss a lot.

    Here is an excerpt of the Wikipedia article on him:

    “By the 1980s, with Ronald Reagan as president and the growing involvement of the religious right in conservative politics, Goldwater’s libertarian views on personal issues were revealed; he believed that they were an integral part of true conservatism. Goldwater viewed abortion as a matter of personal choice, not intended for government intervention.[45]

    As a passionate defender of personal liberty, he saw the religious right’s views as an encroachment on personal privacy and individual liberties.[46] In his 1980 Senate reelection campaign, Goldwater won support from religious conservatives but in his final term voted consistently to uphold legalized abortion and, in 1981, gave a speech on how he was angry about the bullying of American politicians by religious organizations, and would “fight them every step of the way”.

    By god, me too. Dominionists, watch your asses! You have been exposed.

    Can’t wait for Leah Burton’s new book!

  • 300. pfesser53  |  August 24, 2011 at 5:34 am

    Vacation week. Good times. I have 175′ of drain tile to lay and 200′ of open ditch to cover today, before the lead elements of the hurricane hit Virginia. Yesterday I finished wiring the GPS into my old Cessna (1962 model!) in the morning and then worked in the heat digging my drainage ditch all afternoon. Collapsed around 2100 on the couch after the little woman made me some scrumptious catfish over hickory charcoal and some amazing corn dodgers. My younger son came home for a final visit before classes start; he and his friend helped dig and lay pipe all afternoon. A nice shower, a little toddy, and that’s the last thing I remember. It doesn’t get any better than this. Physical labour is great for the soul; a much-appreciated counterpoint to sitting in a dark room all day, looking at black-and-white pictures and talking to myself.

    You lazy-asses need to get yourselves out of bed! Love reading the comments, but nobody except the Poolman ever seems to be up at a decent hour. Rise and shine! It’s already 0530 and I’ve been up since 0400! Hell, half the day’s gone, boys!

  • 301. an800lbgorilla  |  August 24, 2011 at 7:28 am

    Pfesser, where are you? Northern VA?

  • 302. an800lbgorilla  |  August 24, 2011 at 7:52 am

    I just want everyone prepared for the pResident’s plan</strike speech on jobs…

  • 303. an800lbgorilla  |  August 24, 2011 at 7:53 am

    Well, my code writing ability is obvious…

  • 304. an800lbgorilla  |  August 24, 2011 at 8:44 am

    Let’s try this one more time:

    I just want everyone to be prepared for the pResident’s plan speech on jobs…

  • 305. an800lbgorilla  |  August 24, 2011 at 10:07 am

  • 306. poolman  |  August 24, 2011 at 11:09 am

    Pfesser,

    I will attempt to answer your questions from what I know as a believer over the past 30 plus years. (BTW, I relish these type of challenges as they help me define my faith. :wink:)

    I can think of some questions for the Imaginary Friend:
    1 – Why do you make humans fallible and then torture them forever because they failed due to your own incompetence? Why don’t you just make them good? (Yeah, yeah – free will and all that bullshit)

    The biblical account states humans started out pure and good, without knowing the difference between good and evil. Everything was performed out of innocence and reverence. The relationship between creator and created was intact. Humans then chose to derail that relationship because they were deceived by another created being – one who wanted to be worshipped and considered equal or even greater than his creator.

    That is what spun this world into chaos, the result of which is still in play. We (humans) are living through that choice made by our collective ancestors. Just as adding a single drop of black ink to a container of pure water contaminates the entire contents of the vessel, so “sin” was introduced into the gene pool and thus contaminated the entire pool.

    Did God know it would be so? Yes. Why did He allow it? Now there is a good question. Biblically it allowed for this entire drawn out contest between the forces of good and those of evil. Just as yin needs yang, day needs night, hot needs cold, etc., to provide balance in addition to diversity.

    2 – Why you, all-powerful and the be-all of everything, require humans to worship you? Are you really that insecure?

    Worship is based on love and devotion and is much like what we ourselves want from our kids and pets, the ones we established and provide for. Those beings that we are lord over. It’s never forced, otherwise it isn’t sincere.

    3 – Why do you, omniscient and omnipotent, allow evil? Because if you don’t foretell it, you are not omniscient. If you see it and can do nothing, you are not omnipotent. If you can do both and do nothing, you are evil. (Or perhaps don’t exist – nah, couldn’t be THAT.)

    See expanded answer in question 1

    4 – Why do you play games? Why not just show yourself and then the game is over and we can all get down to some serious god-worshipping? Why go through all this time-wasting and mental masturbation?

    The story in the book of Exodus does plenty to help ‘splain much of this one. In summary: Prior to the gift of the Holy Spirit given to believers (pre Jesus’ sacrifice), the presence of God is/was like being exposed to nuclear fusion. Humans can’t “hold up” to such a force. God’s reflection and signature is in/on ALL of creation. Like deciphering code, you first need the key. Sometimes it takes a locksmith – enter the prophets. Sometimes we’re given a master key – enter Jesus.

    More later – or maybe someone else can play. I have to get out and check on my shotcrete crew.

  • 307. Tex Taylor  |  August 24, 2011 at 11:10 am

    Muffy, you’re welcome.

    Rutherford doesn’t ask the right questions.

    Many people who consider themselves intellectual more often than not carry a common malady with respect to faith. It doesn’t always hold, as the smartest people I have personally ever met were self-professed Christian – some since they were young, more often than not as young adults. Rutherford and Pfesser will not, perhaps can not, understand that their questions begin with a false premise.

    They mistakenly believe, or are arrogant enough to believe, that man is sovereign of this world. How dare God not invoke His power for almighty man!

    And if you frame your questions about God in that context, then you invariably are left with no answers that will satisfy and you go looking to mock. Why do you think this small group of atheists is so loud in voice? And after a time, one becomes more and more crass, either out of arrogance, or frustration, or if they are intelligent enough, in some cases fear – almost begging for proof they might understand. The more they criticize, the more crass and irreligious the questions become, the more clouded the judgment, the dumber the conclusions like this Dominionist bunk – laughable. In this way, they only reaffirm my faith. This is something that has to be. 2nd Peter, Chapter 2.

    What Rutherford doesn’t understand about me, is the only questions I might be willing to ask upon my death might be, “Why would a Holy and Righteous Almighty God allow such an imperfect person as me one shot at this wonderful life on this beautiful earth You and You alone created?”

    And I believe when you can frame the question that way, no matter how child like that may sound to the unbeliever, when you are no longer in opposition to the Spirit, you begin to understand and it follows you the rest of your life.

    ————–

    I’ve been watching with some interest Christopher Hitchens, who in all likelihood will die soon of esophageal cancer, struggle with his lifetime of atheism. In the last interview I saw, gone is the crass arrogance and mocking. Hitchens looks like death – the reaper is at the door. None of us escape this. Now Hitchen’s attitude and conversation is a resignation of sorts. While he refuses to denounce his atheism as he still a prideful man, the militancy is no longer present. The same will happen to these two.

    ———–

    I once read a story about an atheist and an elderly Jewish Rabbi who were sitting on a plane in return to the United States. The atheist noted how respectful the man’s children and grandchildren were to him, tending to his every need. The atheist noted how jealous he was, how his family dysfunctional, his children seldom present in his life. Somehow, the discussion changed to one of faith, and the atheist, much like Pfesser is predictably here, begin to scoff at “snakes” and “floods”, openly mocking the copy of the Rabbi’s Torah. This went on for some time, with the Rabbi nodding his head and remaining pretty quiet.

    Finally, the old Rabbi looked at the atheist and said, “You ask me a few hours ago why my children and grandchildren so respectful, so loving? I just shrugged and didn’t answer because you weren’t ready for the answer. Now you are. Would you like to know my secret?”

    The atheist flippantly answered, “Sure. What’s the secret?”

    The Rabbi patted the atheist’s arm and said, “See my friend. To my family, I am one step closer to Mt. Sinai. To your children, you’re one step nearer a glorified ape.”

  • 308. Rutherford  |  August 24, 2011 at 11:10 am

    You would logically think someone would have been demoted, fired, or reprimanded. Instead many got promotions.

    Poolman, does the phrase “heckuva job Brownie” ring a bell?

  • 309. Rutherford  |  August 24, 2011 at 11:25 am

    Hey Pfesser …. I assumed you felt the quake. Scary or a non-starter?

  • 310. an800lbgorilla  |  August 24, 2011 at 11:33 am

    The Pentagon shook. Not the building I expected to “shake”…

  • 311. Rutherford  |  August 24, 2011 at 11:36 am

    Muffy, if I offended you I am sorry. Despite some flippant responses, as well as some obvious doubt regarding religion I truly am not interested in offending anyone. That’s why Tex’s response surprised me a bit because I was trying to engage on an intellectual level, both in praising that one sentence atom bomb that Pfesser posted, as well as what one might ask God if given the chance.

    You may be right. Perhaps it is wrong to engage on this topic since my views are highly unlikely to change and since your faith is a great comfort to you, why should I mess with it with seemingly irreverent questions?

    Sometimes I just can’t help myself. For example the fact that you would ask God why he has forgiven us our sins completely floors me. I don’t see the forgiveness in God that you do. I see people on their last leg get yet another punch to the gut. I call that punishment, not forgiveness or mercy.

    So again, maybe you’re right that I shouldn’t engage. We see at least some aspects of life through different prescription lenses.

  • 312. Rutherford  |  August 24, 2011 at 11:37 am

    Yeah G, I saw your BINGO card yesterday. Good to see you haven’t lost your sense of humor.

  • 313. Hucking Fypocrites  |  August 24, 2011 at 11:40 am

    Senator Obama…

  • 314. Rutherford  |  August 24, 2011 at 11:51 am

    For the benefit of those who didn’t watch all of G’s video or who couldn’t decipher the lyrics … go here for them.

    Kudos G … that was entertaining!

  • 315. Tex Taylor  |  August 24, 2011 at 12:02 pm

    Sometimes I just can’t help myself. For example the fact that you would ask God why he has forgiven us our sins completely floors me. I don’t see the forgiveness in God that you do. I see people on their last leg get yet another punch to the gut. I call that punishment, not forgiveness or mercy.

    I hesitate to even write this because this will push the boundaries. God forgive me for pointing out the obvious if I have overstepped my bounds. And that request is not to this room. I don’t need your forgiveness.

    Why should you receive mercy Rutherford? Though all are guilty of imperfection and one death required, we all are offered something greater than mercy. If God does exists and He is the God of Abraham, Isaac and Jacob, and I have made it abundantly clear here that I believe He absolutely does and is, and assuming He would be willing to intervene on your behalf, your attitude and mocking demeanor deserve just the opposite of mercy. Actually, you are receiving mercy and don’t know it Rutherford, as you’re being granted a measure of time. God holds your life, my life, and anybody else who peruses through this blog in the palm of His hand.

    You can’t even recognize the simple fact one of God’s greatest qualities is His restraint. Are you so arrogant, you think you’re going to continue to get away with this garbage you shovel forever? And you want mercy with your scoffing? :shock:

    Actually, I find your form of sanctimonious attitude far more insidious the Pfesser’s. Pfesser has had some traumatic event, or bad personal relationship, or disappointment. I’ve witnessed it a thousand times. It’s not enough to deny. He must destroy. He can’t.

    Your position Rutherford is one of sheer arrogance…intellectual gamesmanship that you are losing. You don’t need material wealth, or your home boys, or your 401K, or even your health at this minute. You best figure that out quickly.

  • 316. Rutherford  |  August 24, 2011 at 12:11 pm

    G, Jim Miklaszewski an NBC Pentagon reporter said that the first thing he thought was another terrorist attack. Some in New York feared the same thing.

    Osama may be dead but his evil legacy lives on.

  • 317. Rutherford  |  August 24, 2011 at 12:17 pm

    Honestly Tex, even though I have been dealt blow after blow over the past 10 years I really wasn’t referring to myself. Indeed you’re right … an all powerful God with a real vindictive streak would have struck me dead years ago for some of the stuff I’ve uttered.

    I was referring to folks who don’t mock religion. Heck, folks who worship God still get a raw deal, unless JUST being alive is the gift for which we all should be thankful.

    But you are right … I’d be a hypocrite (or at least mentally ill) to be seeking mercy for myself from an entity whose very existence I doubt.

  • 318. an800lbgorilla  |  August 24, 2011 at 12:30 pm

    Initial jolt, maybe, but the roll gives it away. My so. cal. time preped me for this I guess…

  • 319. an800lbgorilla  |  August 24, 2011 at 1:32 pm

    Round 1…

  • 321. Tex Taylor  |  August 24, 2011 at 2:55 pm

    This is consummate free market constitutional populism. Yet our governing elite has lost its bearings and even its moorings in historical reality. Perry’s views on what now is euphemistically called “quantitative easing” are virtually indistinguishable from those of a lot of irresponsible maniacs including most of the delegates to the Constitutional Convention of 1787 and such disreputable figures as Thomas Paine, George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, and James Madison.

    It’s easy to forget, once we’ve cleaned them up and chiseled them into nice, sanitary, granite that the Founders were, literally and figuratively, the Tea Partiers of their day. They too were scorned by their elitists, the Royalists, as seditious riffraff. Polite society heaped our Founders with much the same contempt as our governing class now reserves for the modern Tea Party.

    And most, if not quite all, of the Founders virulently attacked the same darn thing as did Mr. Perry: funny money. Those who wrote and championed the Constitution and the statesmen of young America detested the idea of funny money like Federal Reserve Notes. Real money was, exclusively, gold and silver. They, like Perry, considered their era’s “quantitative easing” both immoral and economically toxic.

    Damn straight! I just saw in the theater of my mind Pfesser’s head spin 360 twice – both ways. Haw Haw Haw Haw!! Rick Perry and Deist Jefferson in the same sentence with the same philosophy. Damn, I wish I had wrote that. But then it would have been discounted and not nearly as effective.

    I don’t need or want government to “create jobs”. The only thing those dumb bastards create is cost, regulation, dummies, and chaos. I want government to get the hell out of our economy period. They can concentrate on making sure our meat and vegetables are sanitary.

    Three of Obama’s dumb cabinet were cheating on their own taxes. And we nominate those buffoons as top macro economists, then many wonder why Obama’s plan hasn’t worked? What a joke of a government we have anymore…

    Thank you Gorilla for providing that.

  • 322. Rutherford  |  August 24, 2011 at 3:09 pm

    Dammit G, you’ve got me walking around the apartment singing “Keynes and Hayek throwing down”. Video is damn catchy. My wife must think I’ve lost my mind. :-)

    The definition of a nerd: Someone who raps about economics.

  • 323. Tex Taylor  |  August 24, 2011 at 3:10 pm

    This one isn’t going to go over big either with the Libertarians and their abortion on demand crowd either. Better be careful what you wish for….

    http://althouse.blogspot.com/2011/08/ron-pauls-experience-in-science-and.html

    And yeah, I’d vote for Ron Paul a thousand times over before I would vote for Barack Obama.

  • 324. Rutherford  |  August 24, 2011 at 5:35 pm

    As promised many threads ago … and this is for Rabbit mainly:

    I found my old trading spreadsheet. Now we’re not talking big money here by any stretch … but … from March to October 2007 using a formula of my own design (a simple one) I had an average 9.84% profit on my investments. I wasn’t day trading but what I would call “week-trading”, i.e. watching how the stocks performed week to week and keeping an eye on sell targets. Over that time, I bought ten stocks, six of which were winners (ok not THAT good … a bit better than a coin flip). Still I liked my “method” and had I not been laid off I would have continued with it.

    Funny thing is, as you (Rabbit) have mentioned, there is a torture to this because you invariably either hold onto a stock too long or sell it right before it makes much better gains. As much fun as I had, I also spent a lot of time full of anxiety and self-loathing. :-)

    P.S. I also had long term holdings with mixed results, not including what was in my 401K.

  • 325. dead rabbit  |  August 24, 2011 at 5:41 pm

    Yo, Rutherford….did you play the option game?

  • 326. dead rabbit  |  August 24, 2011 at 5:47 pm

    By the way, the Rabbit was almost lost at sea the other night. 10 miles from the coast in Lake St. Claire, possibly in the shipping lanes.

    The battery was dead, no lights, no flares, no motor, sun setting.

    As we bobbed in the middle of the lake for about an hour, it finally occurred to my brother that he brought a brand new battery on board! Classic duh moment that you can’t help but be happy about.

    Lake St. Clair can be a widow maker.

  • 327. Rutherford  |  August 24, 2011 at 6:10 pm

    Yo, Rutherford….did you play the option game?

    Are you kidding me? As I’ve said before, options scare(d) the hell out of me. The whole business of buying contracts … kinda like buying the stock, one step removed, just never settled in my brain firmly. I sort of understood how to do it … but “sort of” doesn’t cut it when your money is on the line. I’m amazed at how you’ve embraced options.

    Right before I got out of the market, I wanted to dabble in ETF’s. I never got around to it. I also had a passing interest in FOREX which I never pursued.

    P.S. I got on Jim Cramer’s “Mad Money” show twice as a caller but I’m positive he black-balled me after my second “appearance” because I didn’t answer fast enough and when I did answer “DuPont”, he freaked and told me I made a lousy pick. :lol: He really liked me the first time. I called in with a question (which I no longer remember) and he ran with it. I’ve got a love-hate relationship with Cramer. From my experience, his track record on picks is no better than a coin flip. But damn there is no falling asleep on his show!

  • 328. Tex Taylor  |  August 24, 2011 at 7:06 pm

    Hey Rutherford, speaking of being hoisted by your own petard, would this qualify? :grin:

    Aren’t you ashamed :?:

  • 329. poolman  |  August 24, 2011 at 8:54 pm

    Tex,

    you posted the same video as Huck did in 313. I don’t think it necessary to go backwards. Obama has not done anything he said he would while he was campaigning. Whether he just has no real control or he was an awfully convincing liar, is quite evident.

    Our government is like a game of musical chairs. The difference is we add a chair every time the song stops instead of taking one away. These are not Obama’s people, they are the same crooks making the rounds no matter who the head puppet is.

    Fire all their asses.

    I think it apropos the Washington Monument (that obelisk, aka masonic/phalanx symbol, aka sacred stone of Baal) cracked from the earthquake. :lol:
    :cool: More fun to come, stay tuned…

  • 330. Tex Taylor  |  August 24, 2011 at 10:20 pm

    Pool mold,

    I don’t think it necessary to go backwards.

    Why? That’s the story of your life.

    You voted for him Dick Head. Set that in one of your four working 8K memory banks which you somewhere deleted along the way.

    Only a maggot like you would find humor in a beautiful national monument being damaged. Now had it fallen on you, that I could find funny.

  • 331. poolman  |  August 24, 2011 at 11:12 pm

    I did vote for him. I haven’t learned how to change the past, yet. You? If not, then STFU. Good thing there is forgiveness and some of us learn from our mistakes.

    I’m all in for Ron Paul, now, though I don’t expect you to “see the light” anytime – especially since you are such a Zionist horndog.

    No wonder, since he does not play their game, Ron Paul is such a threat to their control. Consider the insight of our long time friend and courageous advocate of an American First foreign policy, Mark Dankof. He gets to the core reason why the (FCM) Fawning Corporate Media wants to prevent Ron Paul from winning the GOP nomination.
    “Israel, the Jewish Lobby worldwide, the Central Bankers, and the energy/gas consortiums, are the driving force behind making this war happen. Jay Solomon’s story (WSJ – Senators Press Obama On Iran’s Central Bank) indeed notes that Senator Mark Kirk (R., Illinois) and Senator Charles Schumer (D., New York), are the co-sponsors of the letter, in a “sign of bipartisan support for tougher financial measures against Iran. . . .“ What the Wall Street Journal omits, of course, is that Kirk received more Israeli/Jewish PAC money for his initial election to the Senate, than any other candidate in the last election cycle, and that Schumer’s pockets have been lined historically with reams of the same levels of financial largesse for doing the bidding of the Zionist State. We might also draw the legitimate and documentable conclusion that Kirk, Schumer, and their colleagues in both houses of Congress, demonstrate the stranglehold that Israel has on both major political parties, as demonstrated each year by Hugh Galford and Janet McMahon of the Washington Report on Middle East Affairs in Washington. The numbers provided annually by Galford and McMahon provide the quantitative proof of what President Obama told Ha’aretz in his last trip to Israel: that Obama himself could not possibly have been elected to the U. S. Senate in Illinois (the seat now held by Kirk, by the way), or the American Presidency, without the amount of Jewish money and political support that came his way. Presumably, the President is saying something about the larger political system and the way it works systemically. Follow the money trail. And the Bankers. And the number of Israeli assets in the GOP Presidential sweepstakes (the exception is Ron Paul) who have never met a surrogate war they didn’t like, including the one on the drawing board now they will assiduously promote if The Masters should decide that Mr. Obama needs replacing in 2012 for insufficient sycophancy.”
    Sadly, many Tea Party conservatives still accept the Neocon foreign policy deception. Ron Paul is a non-interventionist, not an isolationist. Watch the thinking man’s version of a strong leader in the video, Ron Paul Speaks Out: Media Blackout, Economic Freedom, Intellectual Revolution. Go beyond the sound bites and ads, then ask the hard questions.

    http://www.veteranstoday.com/2011/08/22/liberty-for-the-ron-paul-generation/

  • 332. poolman  |  August 24, 2011 at 11:24 pm

    Well I didn’t get that code quite right. That’s what I get for trying to hold a conversation with my wife while attempting to post. :oops:

    Editor’s note: I fixed it for you. :-)

  • 333. Tex Taylor  |  August 24, 2011 at 11:26 pm

    If not, then STFU. Good thing there is forgiveness and some of us learn from our mistakes.

    A horn dog, hey? Now there is a term I haven’t heard since probably high school. Figures it would come from you – must have picked that up from one of your idiot sisters at Fat Grannies.

    Pool Mold, you’re such an easy target with that giant potato head of yours. You must be a really slow learner if you learn from mistakes. You’ve actually digressed from simpleton to sheer stupidity since you hit this board.

    As far as SingTFU? Well, here’s another old cliche from high school to rattle your floppy drive memory.

    Make me. :wink:

  • 334. Tex Taylor  |  August 24, 2011 at 11:48 pm

    This feminist protest beats the hell out of the Fat Grannies sagging boob and butt parade I saw a few weeks back. Eeewwwww.

    Oh, and just in case, not work safe…

    http://theothermccain.com/2011/08/24/not-all-feminists-are-ugly-and-humorless/

  • 335. Rutherford  |  August 25, 2011 at 12:06 am

    Call me nitpicky but what was with that lady with her bikini’d butt sticking out the window? Kinda ruined all the fun for me. :-(

  • 336. Rutherford  |  August 25, 2011 at 12:10 am

    Tex, Poolman beat me to the punch on pointing out that you re-posted Huck’s video. But I’ve seen this before. You conservatives see a video you like disparaging Obama and you just can’t help yourselves. Gotta post it!

    I must admit that Obama will probably go down in history as having the greatest disparity between his campaign rhetoric and his actual governance. :neutral:

  • 337. Tex Taylor  |  August 25, 2011 at 12:11 am

    Damn “R”, ruined the fun?

    That was my favorite part of the video. Is there any more beautiful site on earth than two lovely cheeks in a skimpy bikini? Have you lost your mind? I had my tablet tilted up watching it.

    Did I tell you I hit the curb in my truck a few weeks back while driving by the neighborhood community pool. Get one of those 21yr old lifeguards leaned against the chain link fence in a two piece, and I might as well be driving blind.

  • 338. Tex Taylor  |  August 25, 2011 at 12:13 am

    You conservatives see a video you like disparaging Obama and you just can’t help yourselves. Gotta post it!

    Like rabid dogs on a pork chop. :smile: I think it was a Freudian that I posted it twice. :twisted:

  • 339. poolman  |  August 25, 2011 at 12:25 am

    Only a maggot like you would find humor in a beautiful national monument being damaged. Now had it fallen on you, that I could find funny.

    Actually I was hoping for a repeat of 2 Kings 10:26,27, since they are one in the same. I need a new pissin’ spot when I visit the east coast. :grin:

  • 340. poolman  |  August 25, 2011 at 12:58 am

    Editor’s note: I fixed it for you.

    Thanks, Rutherford. Too bad you can’t “fix” Tex that easily. :lol:

  • 341. Rutherford  |  August 25, 2011 at 1:02 am

    Poolman, your “truther” tendencies got me thinking this evening. Even though knocking down the Twin Towers definitely sent a message, and killed lots of folks, I would have found the symbolic wound much greater if they had flown a plane into Lady Liberty. Hell, the Twin Towers represented a bunch of fat cats that most Americans can’t relate to. The Statue of Liberty represents our core morality.

    I know it sounds like a morbid “what if” game for me to be playing but for some reason your recent comments combined with the Washington Monument getting damaged made me think about what American symbol’s destruction would pack the biggest wallop.

    Then again, maybe I’ve watched Planet of the Apes too many damn times. :-)

  • 342. poolman  |  August 25, 2011 at 1:23 am

  • 343. poolman  |  August 25, 2011 at 1:34 am

    But Rutherford, now you’re thinking logically. Watch out where that may lead. :shock:

    Besides, there wasn’t a mandate to remove all the asbestos from the Statue of Liberty. The twin towers were loaded with asbestos and under New York state law, the asbestos was going to have to be removed.

  • 344. Hucking Fypocrites  |  August 25, 2011 at 2:21 am

    “The Statue of Liberty represents our core morality.”

    Our morality was never the intended target. The fat cats capitalists were. To Osama, they are the reason we have to support certain leaders and countries. And it was that support, along with our infidel presence in his beloved Holy Land, that put the bug up his fundamentalist ass.

  • 345. poolman  |  August 25, 2011 at 3:40 am

    Our morality was never the intended target. The fat cats capitalists were. To Osama, they are the reason we have to support certain leaders and countries. And it was that support, along with our infidel presence in his beloved Holy Land, that put the bug up his fundamentalist ass.

    He was opposed to our immoral influence in his native country – yes our “infidel presence” in Allah’s “Holy Land”. OBL went after soldiers and military targets, only threatening our civilians that were “desecrating” Saudi Arabia. He claimed it was America’s actions that made it unsafe for American civilians.

    He did an interview published in a Pakistani paper on 9/28/2001. Here’s video of one he did in October 2001. In it, he reiterated that he did not do 9/11, but felt Allah gave victory to those who did. He also mentioned America contains a “government within our government” and likely Israel was responsible. He also defined the true conflict was between the Crusaders and Islam.

  • 346. poolman  |  August 25, 2011 at 4:07 am

    Dead men tell no tales…

  • 347. dead rabbit  |  August 25, 2011 at 4:46 am

    Poolman, I bet it makes you pretty happy that every year I have to address more and more kids in class claiming America slaughtered 3000 of its own people on 9-11.

    That’s why R’s flippant attitude towards you infuriates me.

    There are millions of poolmen trading fantasies online. Your brand of evil is dangerous.

    Rutherford laments the lack of a moderate Muslim voice condemning extremism but finds you a “zany” contributor offering the blog an alternative viewpoint.

    What a joke.

    This coming from the guy who lectured us about the dangers of even using an abstract metaphor because….well… I never did understand what Sara Palin had to do with the Tucson murders.

    How ironic: its an Arizona man on R’s own blog, but this Arizona man aint using metaphors.

    Disagree with R about the stimulus or Tea Party and his gloves come off.

    Blame Obama for outright lying to the entire world about Osama bin Laden’s death and its no big deal.

    Poolman, you are no different then the mouth piece of any other terrorist group out there.

    Hell, at least Hamas can site unfortunate instances when the people they claim to represent were, in fact, victimized.

    You charge America with the most vile and diabolical acts against its own people while enjoying a comfy life as a free man rocking the 1st Amendment into the wee hours of the night.

    Rutherford might not defend the Obama administration from your slanderous words, but I will.

    I will say it again.

    Follow up on your de facto declaration of war against my country with action, and I will end up taking you to the taxidermist so that he makes you into one of those “zany” jackalope trophies.

  • 348. an800lbgorilla  |  August 25, 2011 at 5:26 am

    Florida Republican Congressman John Mica offered the following morally clear Amendment (5/25/2011-H.AMDT.318 (A018) Amends H.R.1540):

    Amendment requires that the rules of engagement [ROE] allow any military service personnel assigned to duty in a designated hostile fire area to have rules of engagement that fully protect their right to proactively defend themselves from hostile actions.

    The results? (tallied here):

    143 out of 185 Democrats present — 77% — voted against this amendment; 217 out of 235 Republicans present — 92% — voted for it.

    Ron Paul also voted against it, which is one of many reasons why he will never get my vote. I’d consider him for Treasury, but I would NEVER put him in charge of our foreign or domestic policy. Period.

  • 349. an800lbgorilla  |  August 25, 2011 at 5:49 am

    “He was opposed to our immoral influence in his native country – yes our “infidel presence” in Allah’s “Holy Land”. OBL went after soldiers and military targets, only threatening our civilians that were “desecrating” Saudi Arabia. He claimed it was America’s actions that made it unsafe for American civilians.” – Piss Pot

    Oh my, suddenly he has feelings and thoughts? I thought he was a puppet?

    This is truly spoken like someone who has never once stepped foot in the Middle East. Never a more hypocritical place will you find- and I actually like the place, I just recognize the bullshit for what it is. I certainly don’t see our INVITED presence to DEFEND Saudi Arabia as immoral.

    As for civilian targets, once again you demonstrate how fucked up in the head you are. All those “little eichmons” were legitimate eh? UBL wanted America destroyed- all of it. He wanted world domination. He wasn’t a freedom fighter, he was a fucking terrorist who took pleasure in the death of anyone who wouldn’t conform to HIS twisted view of Islam.

    R, for the life of me, I don’t know why you don’t get rid of this fucker. His lies sicken me and frankly, the racism is more than enough…

  • 350. pfesser53  |  August 25, 2011 at 7:19 am

    800lbgorilla –

    I’m in southern VA. My only regret is that I didn’t move here thirty years ago. Nice folks. The black folks, especially, here are without exception the very best. Very hard workers, polite, respectful. All the kids – black and white – call adults sir and ma’am. Everybody hunts and owns guns, but unlike the WV coalfields, don’t have a chip on their shoulder. Nobody looks a second time at mixed couples. I have a queer employee; we occasionally have parties at my house with only gay/lesbian couples and everybody has a blast. This is a great place to raise kids. I’ve only been here six years, but am told it has really changed from the Old South racism of the ‘sixties. We are however starting to get a few of “Roosevelt’s Grandchildren” – single moms with multiple kids by multiple sperm donors – I don’t call them fathers because they don’t do any fathering. You can thank the Great Society for that.

    Interesting, having come from the North. I haven’t heard “mother*ucker” a single time from a young black man since I came here. My wife says it is because most of the black families are still together here and the churches are strong. “The black grannies would slap the sh*t out of some young punk that talked like that.”

    Takes some getting used to, but I like it. My son has even started calling me “sir.” Very strange

  • 351. pfesser53  |  August 25, 2011 at 7:27 am

    Rutherford –

    Re: quake. Interesting. I was knee-deep in a drainage ditch cutting roots off with my Saws-all and heard a rumbling noise. I stopped the Saws-all to listen and it was my house, acting like a big sounding board.

    We occasionally have small temblors here, so I said, “Cool!” and put my hand on the dirt but felt nothing. My wife and housekeeper came out and were a bit spooked; they said the glassware tried to come out of the cabinets. It was interesting; I couldn’t feel a thing directly on the ground, but the house shook a bit. Epicenter was less than a hundred miles from here.

    They say the Federal Govt shut down for a time.

    It’s a damned good start.

  • 352. an800lbgorilla  |  August 25, 2011 at 7:37 am

    Housekeeper?

    My, my, we’ve adjusted well to the southern life style…

  • 353. an800lbgorilla  |  August 25, 2011 at 7:41 am

    By the by, thanks for the response, I was curious if you were in Northern VA.

    I’m glad you have a “diversified” social group. Hope it works out for you…

  • 354. pfesser53  |  August 25, 2011 at 7:41 am

    re: biblical contradictions.

    Interestingly, the Reason Project has produced a beautiful poster delineating such things. Very well thought-out format. White bars represent Old Testament; gray New Testament. Red arcs show which passages contradict each other.

    An excellent tool for testing one’s credulity – er, I mean faith. I recommend all the devout have one for their office or den.

  • 355. pfesser53  |  August 25, 2011 at 7:43 am

    Sorry – forgot the link:

    I think there is a better one at the Reason Project, but I don’t have the time to fish it out; gotta finish that ditch today.

    Man, this vacation is killing me!. I gotta get back to work at the hospital so I can get some rest!

  • 356. pfesser53  |  August 25, 2011 at 7:58 am

    I apologise in advance for the length of this quote, but it was so funny I had to share it all. This juanitajean is pretty funny; I’m adding her to my list of blogs.

    “Richard Dawkins, every thinking woman’s hunka hunka burnin’ love, weighed in on Rick Perry’s thoughts – and by thoughts I mean something not even distantly related to thinking – on evolution.

    Texans would say that on evolution Rick Perry has his hind part before his front part and neither part is dressed properly. Dawkins, who has been to Texas several times but hasn’t learned the language, says this instead —”

    ‘There is nothing unusual about Governor Rick Perry. Uneducated fools can be found in every country and every period of history, and they are not unknown in high office. What is unusual about today’s Republican party (I disavow the ridiculous ‘GOP’ nickname, because the party of Lincoln and Theodore Roosevelt has lately forfeited all claim to be considered ‘grand’) is this: In any other party and in any other country, an individual may occasionally rise to the top in spite of being an uneducated ignoramus. In today’s Republican Party ‘in spite of’ is not the phrase we need. Ignorance and lack of education are positive qualifications, bordering on obligatory. Intellect, knowledge and linguistic mastery are mistrusted by Republican voters, who, when choosing a president, would apparently prefer someone like themselves over someone actually qualified for the job.’

    The term “incisive” comes to mind…

    link to her blog: http://juanitajean.com/2011/08/24/good-words/

  • 357. an800lbgorilla  |  August 25, 2011 at 8:11 am

    In any other party and in any other country, an individual may occasionally rise to the top in spite of being an uneducated ignoramus. In today’s Republican Democrat Party ‘in spite of’ is not the phrase we need. Ignorance and lack of education are positive qualifications, bordering on obligatory. pre-posed Intellect, claimed knowledge and <teleprompted linguistic mastery are mistrusted by Republican Democrat voters, who, when choosing a president, would apparently prefer someone like themselves based on skin color over someone actually qualified for the job.’

    Fixed it for you…

  • 358. El Tigre  |  August 25, 2011 at 8:21 am

    I was looking around at the democrats in Atlanta thinking how educated, intellectual, and “qualified for the job” is the priority. :roll: Hell, I was thinking about all of the qualifications Obama brought to the table too. :roll:

    Thanks for the invite. I won’t be visiting your sophomoric friend’s blog. After all, we got Poolman, who finds humor in damage tour national monuments and the destruction of the twin towers on 9/11 a win/win because the asbestos.

    Rabbit @ 347, agreed!

  • 359. El Tigre  |  August 25, 2011 at 8:37 am

    Tex, Coulter must have been eavesdropping:

    http://www.anncoulter.com/columns/2011-08-24.html

  • 360. dead rabbit  |  August 25, 2011 at 9:27 am

    Weird. Pfessor, I swear I remember you talking about how uncivilized blacks were behaving at the local gas station back when you were arguing that blacks are biologically more prone to be savage.

    I’m pretty sure I could find the comment.

    Now you live in post racial paradise.

    I lived in Chesterfield for two years, how south are you?

  • 361. Tex Taylor  |  August 25, 2011 at 10:37 am

    Tigre,

    Coulter will have Pfesser tearing out his pubes with that one. If you want to witness something entirely humorous, watch Ben Stein of all people, an economist, get Pfesser’s resident ‘biological genius’ Richard Dawkins so flustered with questions about “life’s beginnings”, that like Crick, Dawkins is penned down to saying it was probably “aliens” that seeded the earth. The ET explanation – I kid you not. I’ll see if I can find the video – it’s from a movie and it pretty much puts to rest the argument of what is the real agenda of punks like Dawkins. The guy even looks like a pervert.

    And you’ll note that no matter how I phrase my questions here, the pat answer from our doctor of radiology is always, “completely clueless – no understanding – random events”, finally swelling up like resident toad to scold me for that’s “not Darwinian theory.” Ribbit…

    Okay, though he never answers my questions about those either. But one problem that always seems to go unmentioned. What is Pfessor using again to explain away the need for a Creator? :smile:

    Look, anybody that is having gay and lesbian couple parties at the shack isn’t what you call mainstream neighborhood material. Kind of the Hugh Hefner of the doctoral profession. Another loon from the Fat Grannies farm that drifted over on the current. I noted yesterday in the article I linked about ‘Dominionism’, the man is as crazy as Pool Mold – albeit much brighter than Pool Mold. That makes it more fun.

  • 362. dead rabbit  |  August 25, 2011 at 10:59 am

    I guess I could see having a gay couple over, if your the kind of dude who happens to have friends from that demographic.

    But parties that are specifically for gay couples?

    Gay and Lesbian couple parties?

    To each his own, but why?

    Almost sounds like some homo version of a minstrel show or something.

  • 363. Tex Taylor  |  August 25, 2011 at 11:01 am

    Here Tigre, I found the world’s most renowned ET theorist. For such an intellectual giant, he wish Dawkins could afford to get his teeth fixed and buy a brush. :wink:

    Are you old enough to remember when we used to laugh at professors like this? Digging up rocks in the desert, unkempt, and smelling of musk and body odor? Somehow, the last 30 or 40 years, these have become our resident theologians and biological experts. It’s kind of followed our country going to hell in a hand basket. Men like Pfesser used to annoy me – now I find myself laughing at them.

  • 364. Rutherford  |  August 25, 2011 at 11:25 am

    Besides, there wasn’t a mandate to remove all the asbestos from the Statue of Liberty.

    Poolman, herein lies the problem with conspiracy theories. If 9/11 wasn’t as portrayed in accepted history, then ought we not settle on ONE truth. Either it was a Bush scheme or it was insurance fraud. Which one?

    It doesn’t help the “truther” movement when they can’t settle on what the “truth” really is. :neutral:

  • 365. Tex Taylor  |  August 25, 2011 at 11:30 am

    Rabbit, I appreciate you taking Pool Mold to task. These insidious charges this idiot makes have gone on long enough without him being called on it.

    Men like him are damaging this country by feeding into the rank propaganda that these anarchist types thrive on. And anarchists are becoming a problem – a real problem.

    We’ve got enough problems in this country to deal with, without these idiots who are obviously far more numerous than I ever suspected, spreading this malicious gossip. It feeds all of America’s enemies, both domestic and foreign, and needs to be stopped – by force if necessary.

    There is a huge difference between free speech and slander.

    Poolman and his cabal slander America.

  • 366. El Tigre  |  August 25, 2011 at 11:37 am

    “Look, anybody that is having gay and lesbian couple parties at the shack isn’t what you call mainstream neighborhood material. Kind of the Hugh Hefner of the doctoral profession.” :lol: :lol: :lol:

    I heard Bert and Ernie frequently in attendance.

  • 367. poolman  |  August 25, 2011 at 11:39 am

    Rabbit,

    I really am glad more kids are seeking the truth and questioning our government’s still unproven version of events. At least their minds are still inquisitive. I could give a flying f**k what you think about me. I’m not here to gain human acceptance or notoriety. All I care about is exposing darkness to light. I know my intent and I’m confident that “you shall know the truth and the truth will set you free.” That entire chapter is words for today to deal with the same “leaders” we still have.

    Thanks for the jackalope reference. I will now think of you with those same cute little antlers. :grin:

  • 368. Hucking Fypocrites  |  August 25, 2011 at 11:49 am

    I was thinking about an interesting set of contradictions yesterday.

    Liberals tend to think homosexuality is not a choice. It is something inside of the person. They cannot be rehabilitated.

    Conservatives tend to think homosexuality is a choice. It is a lifestyle decision people make. They can be rehabilitated.

    Liberals tend to think pedophilia is a choice. It is a lifestyle decision people make. They can be rehabilitated.

    Conservatives tend to think pedophilia is not a choice. It is something inside of the person. They cannot be rehabilitated.

    Some might get peeved I am comparing homosexuals to pedophiles, but the point is that each have an out-of-the-mainstream thing that floats their boat, so to speak. I just think it is interesting how each thing is perceived by particular alignments.

  • 369. Rutherford  |  August 25, 2011 at 11:51 am

    R, for the life of me, I don’t know why you don’t get rid of this fucker. His lies sicken me and frankly, the racism is more than enough…

    Look, I don’t agree with nor endorse some of Poolman’s out-there theories. But until my ego got the better of me, I allowed Elric to spew some wild garbage on this site for a good amount of time and none of you (save Rabbit) said boo about it. Could that be because Elric’s anti-Muslim paranoia fit better into the world view of most of the folks on this board?

    Sorry gang, if you could tolerate an Elric (and even get after me for eventually banning him), you can tolerate a Poolman. And as I’ve said before, Elric chose not to return here after I lifted the ban.

    Last but not least, I try my best to screen comments for potentially criminal content. I don’t think anyone on this board has crossed that line. If you recall, after being alerted to its content, I did remove one of Poolman’s links to a rather vile web site. (LOL in fact according to BiW, the only one who has posted potentially criminal content (libel) has been me. I should ban myself. :lol: )

  • 370. Tex Taylor  |  August 25, 2011 at 11:52 am

    Hell, Yes! I’d Vote For Rick Perry! “These days, of course, I would support Charlie Sheen over Obama. Obama has done for the economy what pantyhose did for foreplay.” ~ KINKY FRIEDMAN
    :lol:

  • 371. Tex Taylor  |  August 25, 2011 at 11:56 am

    Rutherford, I’m not asking you to get rid of Pool Mold. Lord knows you’ve let me get away with murder. Your most redeeming quality is to let everyone have a voice.

    But you ought to call Pool Mold on these insidious charges. You don’t find that inherently dangerous to let these claims of government conspiracy go on?

    For one thing, our government is too incompetent to kill its own people without a trace. They can’t even file their taxes correctly.

  • 372. Tex Taylor  |  August 25, 2011 at 11:58 am

    Want to listen to wisdom and honesty? This is the kind of man that needs to be running the Fed….

  • 373. poolman  |  August 25, 2011 at 12:02 pm

    Rutherford at 364,

    I think 9/11 covered a multitude of sins. The government’s official version does not add up. Period. Just ask those that were on the 9/11 commission. They openly admit road blocks, lies, and non cooperation from every person and avenue they were tasked to investigate.

    There are plenty whose expertise has been applied to discover real truth. We need a new/real investigation. This one event has shaped everything in our “brave new world”.

    The truth movement is full of theories and ideas, all labeled conspiracies by our government. Plenty in the movement are there to derail it. Aside from the “plants” it is chock full of former military, intelligence, and government personnel.

    With the internet, you can do your own research. The hard part is not getting derailed. The intent of those trying to keep this covered is to divide and defame.

  • 374. Hucking Fypocrites  |  August 25, 2011 at 12:09 pm

    “and none of you (save Rabbit) said boo about it”

    Are you freaking kidding me?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!

  • 375. Rutherford  |  August 25, 2011 at 12:12 pm

    Coulter must have been eavesdropping:

    Let’s say Ann is right. Evolution, which after all is still called a theory, not a law (like gravity), is so full of holes as to be completely discredited. What’s Ann’s alternative? The problem I have with most of the folks who discount evolution is that they don’t say “we need to pursue some other scientific explanation.” Instead they say, “no evolution so it must be God.”

    Poppycock! If you want to throw evolution out the window, be my guest, but then commit yourself to finding another intelligent scientific explanation for why things are the way they are.

  • 376. poolman  |  August 25, 2011 at 12:20 pm

    I find it amusing how my accusations of government collusion and corruption are considered treasonous. And in the same thread we get references to our founding fathers who claimed it was our duty as patriots to do the very same.

    Can anyone else grasp the irony in that? :neutral:

  • 377. Rutherford  |  August 25, 2011 at 12:20 pm

    For one thing, our government is too incompetent to kill its own people without a trace. They can’t even file their taxes correctly.

    Yet you find the government, or at least Obama, “competent” enough to willfully destroy the country within the next five years. Interesting dichotomy.

  • 378. Rutherford  |  August 25, 2011 at 12:29 pm

    Huck, regarding your pedo/homo assessment, I’m not sure I agree. I think intelligent liberals believe that pedophilia is hard-wired into a person to the same degree that homosexuality is. The recidivism rate among pedo’s points overwhelmingly to the notion that this is not a choice but a compulsion deeply rooted.

    The other flaw I think in your assessment is your use of the word rehabilitation. I believe that most liberals believe that our penal system should rehabilitate those within it. I believe most conservatives view our penal system as mere punishment … and the more vile the “crime” the more willing they are to just throw away the person for life.

    So you’ve taken a criminal act (pedo) and correctly delineated liberals belief in rehabilitation but you’ve confused that with believing pedo to be a choice. And of course, since homosexuality is not illegal, no rehabilitation is necessary in the first place.

  • 379. pfesser53  |  August 25, 2011 at 12:32 pm

    “Fixed it for you…”

    Thanks. Hehee………

  • 380. Rutherford  |  August 25, 2011 at 12:33 pm

    Are you freaking kidding me?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!

    Huck, my apologies. You are one of the few here who knows islamophobia when you see it. Again, mea culpa. :oops:

  • 381. pfesser53  |  August 25, 2011 at 12:34 pm

    “I lived in Chesterfield for two years, how south are you?”

    I don’t want to say; my town is so small it would be trivial to identify me. I don’t really care that much, but no sense in making it easy.

  • 382. Rutherford  |  August 25, 2011 at 12:37 pm

    Can anyone else grasp the irony in that?

    It is interesting Poolman that several here will not hesitate to not only condemn our current government’s policies, both domestic and foreign, but even assign malicious intent.

    While I find the truther movement wacky as hell, it is interesting how so called patriots write the crap that they write about not only Obama, but the man’s wife … who has done nothing to anyone to deserve abuse.

  • 383. Rutherford  |  August 25, 2011 at 12:39 pm

    I don’t want to say; my town is so small it would be trivial to identify me. I don’t really care that much, but no sense in making it easy.

    Besides, Rabbit, Pfesser doesn’t want you showing up at his queer-couple parties. :-)

    Sorry PF, I couldn’t resist. ;-)

  • 384. Hucking Fypocrites  |  August 25, 2011 at 12:45 pm

    “I find it amusing how my accusations of government collusion waste and corruption are considered treasonous. And in the same thread we get references to our founding fathers who claimed it was our duty as patriots to do the very same.”

    Now you know how the Tea Party feels.

  • 385. Tex Taylor  |  August 25, 2011 at 12:45 pm

    The problem I have with most of the folks who discount evolution is that they don’t say “we need to pursue some other scientific explanation.” Instead they say, “no evolution so it must be God.”

    Interesting supposition from Rutherford which is, as always, incorrect. Quite the contrary, critics of evolution are not condemning evolution as most of us with a degree in the sciences watch adaptation in a lab. Our contention is that evolution, nature if you will, is not capable of explaining the entire scope and complexities of biology and that anything beyond the observable and measurable is pure conjecture.

    I don’t contend that evolution not be taught. Both of my own daughters were taught “evolution” in a private school with the standard methods – and both excel at the sciences. It’s an interesting hypothesis, with an obvious quantifiable measure of truth of which we seem amongst other things resistant bacteria. What I do expect that like every other science and physical construct, both evolution’s strengths and weaknesses in explaining (biological) forces be explored if that is where the science takes us. And that is not happening in public education.

    It’s no different that the claim the science has been settled of “anthropogenic global warming.” Pure poppycock.

    Like I have said at least one hundred times, pure science by definition starts with a degree of rational skepticism using the null hypothesis as proof. Atheistic evolutionists start under the assumption the science is settled, with no skepticism making a multitude of assumptions posing as fact, when much of it is nothing but speculation, not the least of which is dodging the most important element of how life begin.

    But I might even live with that were it not for the fact, which people like Pfesser have demonstrated aptly here, that the desired conclusion(s) has little to do with science but a pronounced outcome driven by where the answers ultimately will lead us. And you can not get away with not recognizing that sooner or later, science and religion will cross paths.

    If you were entirely honest, you would admit as much. But you can’t because of your own biases.

  • 386. pfesser53  |  August 25, 2011 at 12:46 pm

    “Gay and Lesbian couple parties?

    To each his own, but why?”

    I don’t know the exact numbers, but I think it’s about 5% of Americans are queer. It has been my experience that they are smart, funny, tell great stories and are a hell of a lot of fun to be around.

    You know the Greeks (I think) considered queers to be very special people and were kind to them. I feel the same way.

  • 387. Tex Taylor  |  August 25, 2011 at 12:48 pm

    For one thing, our government is too incompetent to kill its own people without a trace. They can’t even file their taxes correctly.

    Yet you find the government, or at least Obama, “competent” enough to willfully destroy the country within the next five years. Interesting dichotomy.

    No dichotomy in the least. It’s the “INCOMPETENCY” that is killing us with Barack Obama only the lead character in the play.

  • 388. Hucking Fypocrites  |  August 25, 2011 at 12:49 pm

    “It is interesting Poolman that several here will not hesitate to not only condemn our current government’s policies, both domestic and foreign, but even assign malicious intent.”

    Welcome to 21st century discourse. Everyone is doing it. If they aren’t doing it to the president and his party, they are doing it to those who oppose the president and his party. It’s a cycle that is going to require all involved to cease their part.

    And we already know they won’t.

  • 389. Hucking Fypocrites  |  August 25, 2011 at 12:54 pm

    “Huck, regarding your pedo/homo assessment….”

    It was really just an observation. I find your points equally interesting. If I had more time or it were actually a topic others wished to discuss it could be fun to get into it further.

  • 390. pfesser53  |  August 25, 2011 at 12:56 pm

    re: Ben Stein. He did a movie a couple of years ago about evolution. It was hilarious; he made a complete laughingstock of himself. There were so many factual and logical errors that it was completely dismissed by everyone and never went anywhere.

    Reminds me of my Automatic Control Systems professor. He was a Ph.D. and absolutely brilliant in Controls, but went around the campus denouncing evolution. “There is no such thing as an organized system without an organizer!” he used to say.

    The chairman of EE, who was a personal friend of mine, shut him down in a meeting by the simple statement: “Then I guess thunderstorms are impossible.”

    Here’s a Youtube video, part of a series called, “Why Do People Laugh at Creationists?” (Only Creationists Don’t Know.)

  • 391. Tex Taylor  |  August 25, 2011 at 1:02 pm

    Huck, I agree with Rutherford about what many Christian Conservatives believe about sexual preference – for different reasons, of course. And many of these people are either medical doctors or advanced degreed scientists.

    But I can only speak for myself in opinion, and this applies both to homosexuality and pedophilia. In fact, it applies to all sexuality.

    Sexuality may or may not have innate characteristics, but I believe it is far more complex that simple genomics. There may be some predisposition. But I am more of the belief that at a young age, much of our sexuality is a learned process that actually develops much of the hard wiring during our toddler and pre adolescent period (neuronal development) in our brains.

    And I doubt, unlike most Christians, that it can be changed. And the further in life you are, the less likely the changes. It more likely that the impulses can be learned to be controlled to some degree.

    I find one of the weaknesses of the Catholic Church in demanding celibacy. I understand its premise, but it takes a very special person to have the self-control to contain a basic impulse. And other than eating and self-preservation, I can’t think of a more basic impulse than the need to procreate. Everything about us is “wired” for that.

    I’ve often wondered if many of these Priests are really homosexual, or simply repressed. There actions though incredibly harmful to the recipient, are almost child like in nature. I may be old, but I can still remember at 4-5 years of age finding any naked body exciting. Somewhere soon thereafter, I had a strong inclination toward “something different”, and by the 3-4th grade, I was definitely heterosexual. In fact, the other physically repulses me.

    But all of that appears to be a learned trait. Trying to be absolutely honest here.

  • 392. Tex Taylor  |  August 25, 2011 at 1:04 pm

    Their actions…. gad.

  • 393. Tex Taylor  |  August 25, 2011 at 1:06 pm

    Thunderstorms would be a really lame example. They are very specifically organized and almost always (within reason) predictable with a high degree of accuracy during the Doppler era.

  • 394. El Tigre  |  August 25, 2011 at 1:12 pm

    R said, “If you want to throw evolution out the window, be my guest, but then commit yourself to finding another intelligent scientific explanation for why things are the way they are.”

    Do you recognize the contradiction in what you said?

    p.s. I am not picking sides. I lack knowledge on the subject as well as the inclination to acquire it. But I do think Coulter has a real bead on the intellectual dishonesty and gamesmanship of the left (e.g.”If you want to throw evolution out the window, be my guest, but then commit yourself to finding another intelligent scientific explanation for why things are the way they are.”).

  • 395. El Tigre  |  August 25, 2011 at 1:23 pm

    Yikes:

    (e.g., “This is the flash mob method of scientific inquiry. Liberals quickly surround and humiliate anyone who disagrees with them. They are baffled when appeals to status (which would work on them) don’t work on everyone else.”).

    Sorry, wrong paste.

  • 396. poolman  |  August 25, 2011 at 1:28 pm

    Now you know how the Tea Party feels.

    Unfortunately Huck, I think the tea party also has also been derailed and infiltrated with “plants” to divide and defame. As long as it claims spokespersons like Glenn Beck, Sarah Palin, Michele Bachmann, Dick Armey, Rick Perry, etc., I cannot embrace it. Nowadays, I think I prefer coffee to tea.

  • 397. an800lbgorilla  |  August 25, 2011 at 1:41 pm

    but the man’s wife … who has done nothing to anyone to deserve abuse.” – R

    Really?

    Expensive massages, top shelf vodka and five-star hotels: First Lady accused of spending $10m in public money on her vacations

  • 398. Tex Taylor  |  August 25, 2011 at 1:50 pm

    Really?

    Expensive massages, top shelf vodka and five-star hotels: First Lady accused of spending $10m in public money on her vacations

    And how many assistant to the First Lady’s has this “spectacular” first lady gone through now? Aren’t we on #4?

    Damn straight Gorilla. Anybody with a shred of common sense, knows Shelly is a world class bully, hypocrite and self-absorbed lout….

    A disgrace. Guaranteed Obama is the likable one – like Shrillary and Bill.

  • 399. Tex Taylor  |  August 25, 2011 at 1:53 pm

    Pool Mold isn’t even consistent in his choices. Rutherford had it right. For weeks here, Mold is off Obama gravy train (truth be known, the freebies haven’t been as larged as promised), off the Progressive Party.

    And then what does Mold throw down as proof? The “Progressive” entitlement form of the Tea Party. Too much. Not even worth a laugh anymore. More a snicker.

    Figures – what’s in it for me.

  • 400. poolman  |  August 25, 2011 at 1:59 pm

    I find myself in agreement with Tex in 391.

    But for me, I was always attracted to girls/women. I remember my dad putting me in the shower with him when I was 4 or 5 at eye level to his crotch/butt. Those visuals made me extremely uncomfortable, in spite of the normal childhood curiosity. :shock:

  • 401. poolman  |  August 25, 2011 at 2:04 pm

    There’s Tex’s ass speaking for him again. :roll:

  • 402. poolman  |  August 25, 2011 at 2:06 pm

    Love to stay and chat as the conversation has been interesting. Unfortunately no one is paying me to be here. :cool:

    Have a blessed day…

  • 403. dead rabbit  |  August 25, 2011 at 2:37 pm

    I don’t know about conservatives, but the Rabbit doesn’t feel pedophiles deserve to be “rehabilitated”. They deserve life in prison and then a shank in the liver.

    When I worked in the juvenile prisons, and I found out I was dealing with a pedophile I would clue in the others on it and do everything I could to ensure the young man didn’t get a GED.

    Don’t judge me until the the day you are asked to “help” someone who raped a baby.

  • 404. dead rabbit  |  August 25, 2011 at 2:40 pm

    Pfessor, I didn’t mean to pry. I hear you when it comes anonymity.

    What about the blacks that live by you, are they biologically predisposed to be savages, or is it the ebony and ivory song.

    I went back and read your whole theory on blacks. You certainly were not to thrilled with the local black population a few months back.

    What changed? Did you find the Lord?

  • 405. Tex Taylor  |  August 25, 2011 at 2:45 pm

    Love to stay and chat as the conversation has been interesting. Unfortunately no one is paying me to be here.

    If I were a complete bastard instead of a partial, I could spend hours gleefully mocking those two sentences.

    For the room’s sake, I’ll let it rest. :smile:

  • 406. dead rabbit  |  August 25, 2011 at 2:49 pm

    ” I understand its premise, but it takes a very special person to have the self-control to contain a basic impulse.”

    Really, if you think about it, the sacrament of marriage is not much different then the priesthood.

    It differs only by one degree.

    I pretty much live the life of a priest except I am only allowed to have sex with one woman. Considering how much I love eating and fucking strange pussy, this is a hefty sacrifice.

    I’m not sure monogamy and celibacy are that far a part when it comes to impulses.

    The problem with today’s priests is that somewhere along the lines of the cultural revolution, it became uncool to become one.

    Old Polish and Italian families used to be beaming with pride if their son became a priest. Two generations later, many of these same families would be slightly embarrassed, whether they admit it or not.

    I admit it, I would feel very weird about my son becoming a priest.

    Thus, the people who ARE becoming priests are social outcasts even within the Catholic cultures of the Western world.

  • 407. dead rabbit  |  August 25, 2011 at 2:56 pm

    “In fact, the other physically repulses me.”-Tex

    lol……Come on Tex. I have an ass like a fury bison and a disgusting pink wiener akin to a German Shepard’s. You don’t want none of that?

  • 408. El Tigre  |  August 25, 2011 at 3:16 pm

    “They deserve life in prison and then a shank in the liver.”

    Rabbitt, you’re clearly the prison expert here, but isn’t it a “shiv” to the liver? I always thought shank was a verb, shiv was noun. For example, Tex might say, ” if Rabbit doesn’t give me some of that pink Shephed snausage when he gets back to the cell, I’m going to get my shiv and shank his fury bison ass.”

    I would like to clear this up before we move on to good prison hooch recipes.

  • 409. dead rabbit  |  August 25, 2011 at 3:17 pm

    I’ll be honest. I have been enjoying the slow collapse of Bank of America.

    The fact that this debacle of a company still exists pisses me off and I know I was personally fucked over by them. I made it a rule not to play them in the market because I knew I would be a emotional sally about it.

    So, now, I actively will be rooting for the demise of the overrated blowhard Warren Buffett.

    Bank of America/Countrywide was collapsing and I was just getting the popcorn ready. The lawsuits alone were going to cripple them. They fucked over other banks. They fucked over people. They forged official documents by the hundreds of thousands. Purposely lost documents. Stole tax payer money.

    Bailed out again, but at least not by the tax payer (although I can’t wait until the real story comes out…..that’s right…I got some poolman blood running in my veins when it comes to Wallstreet)

  • 410. dead rabbit  |  August 25, 2011 at 3:24 pm

    re: 408

    That cracked me up.

    Well, I was only working in juvenile prisons (although rough and full of murderers and rapists, nowhere near the real deal)

    Secondly, I learned real quick that, contrary to what you might think, you never, ever try to be hip and talk in their slang.

    It’s another language. You could easily be tricked into dissing a gang and not even know it. That’s one of the first things they do when your green.

    So, when they would step to me talking slang or Spanish, they got rebuked.

    So I don’t know…..you might be right about the “shiv”. I go off the movies too.

  • 411. dead rabbit  |  August 25, 2011 at 3:25 pm

    Interestingly, females are 100 times better at making a shiv/shank.

    They are very creative.

  • 412. dead rabbit  |  August 25, 2011 at 3:32 pm

    Rutherford, you didn’t ban Elric because of what he said did you? I thought you banned him because of his quasi-spamming style.

  • 413. Pfesser  |  August 25, 2011 at 3:32 pm

    “I went back and read your whole theory on blacks. You certainly were not to thrilled with the local black population a few months back. ”

    Ah, but you mischaracterize my argument, no? A differing temperament – of course not universal, but I believe quite real when a whole group is considered – is but one factor in how one behaves.

    Some of the other factors are home, family, presence of a father, extended family, (yes, church too) and of course, a dedicated and no-bullshit constabulary. (And as I am sure you know, all southern cops have the same name: “Sir”).

    The young black fellow we are talking about, showing his ass in public, was also being counselled by a county sheriff at the time. He walked away spouting off (after he was out of the sheriff’s hearing, of course) but his behavior?

    He went home. Case closed.

  • 414. Pfesser  |  August 25, 2011 at 3:35 pm

    “What changed? Did you find the Lord?”

    I did.

    He was hiding behind the couch the whole time!

  • 415. Tex Taylor  |  August 25, 2011 at 4:10 pm

    I pretty much live the life of a priest except I am only allowed to have sex with one woman. Considering how much I love eating and fucking strange pussy, this is a hefty sacrifice.

    :lol: Hey Barry Bonds, you’re talking to a man that has now gone 19 days since he last saw his beautiful wife as she is taking care of her employee’s toddlers because his wife is hospitalized and his dad is dying – and then, Mrs. Taylor coming home is only a tease. I’m almost satisfied with great meals these days.

    Mrs. Taylor’s libido is about .0001% the fraction of her adoring husband, and has been since, oh about after second baby. What was that? Twenty-one years ago? I’m always giving her a hard time about, “hey, what happened to that little tramp I married? (right before I get my fingers bit)” :mad: :mad: :mad:

    Somehow, I got in my email box the other day which I swear I didn’t apply for called “Adult Finder”, with some pictures of these available “lovelies” from Oklahoma. Most of these beauties looked about 5’2″, 340 foaty. I almost got a boner thinking there might be hope yet. But then I found out you had to pay for the service. Bummer…

  • 416. dead rabbit  |  August 25, 2011 at 4:44 pm

    “He went home. Case closed.” -Pfessor

    More like case opened as he clearly became your case study. He was ridiculously used as evidence for your biological theory.

    I’m not debating your biological theory, as we already have done that.

    I’m no doc, but you were either talking shit back then or talking shit now.

    The dude can’t be used as the norm and then declared an anomaly all within a few months time, can he?

    I’m sniffing intellectual dishonesty and I expect better from a doctor.

  • 417. Rutherford  |  August 25, 2011 at 7:29 pm

    The first thing that comes to mind as I read Poolman, Rabbit and Tex’s latest comments is:
    Too
    Much
    Information :-)

  • 418. Rutherford  |  August 25, 2011 at 7:38 pm

    Rabbit I banned Elric out of pure ego. The asswipe decided to talk to everyone on the board except its owner and when confronted with that fact he chose to keep being a dick. The spam-like “Robert Spencer said …” deluge of comments didn’t help.

    I lifted the ban because I realized my decision was more grounded in my insecurity than his content. I don’t lose sleep that he didn’t come back. I do hope the poor bastard didn’t come into harm’s way. I don’t know any of the WP bloggers who’ve heard from him lately.

  • 419. Rutherford  |  August 25, 2011 at 7:43 pm

    FWIW I do agree with Rabbit that being married is like being a priest one step removed. I count my lucky stars I’m married to the only woman on the face of the Earth who finds my scrawny ass the least bit appealing. I don’t know what I’d do if I were a lady’s man.

  • 420. an800lbgorilla  |  August 25, 2011 at 7:48 pm

    stick the shepard in the bison and call it a night…

  • 421. Tex Taylor  |  August 25, 2011 at 8:14 pm

    Hey “R”, I was just trying to be honest. Mrs. Taylor would confirm that groping is now officially off limits once she aged gracefully past 50, and last time she was home, she bit my finger for making the attempt to cop a feel. :mad:

    So I accepted a wonderful home cooked meal instead, which is the next best thing.

    Now about this ‘Adult Finder’ thing? They even provide a guarantee or your money back. :lol: If you don’t get laid in six months, I guess you get some reimbursement back on your VISA card. I wonder what’s that’s labeled under?

  • 422. Alfie  |  August 25, 2011 at 8:38 pm

    @ PF 354…Why do you hate people of faith and faith so much?

  • 423. pfesser53  |  August 25, 2011 at 8:48 pm

    “Why do you hate people of faith and faith so much?”

    Why, whatever do you mean? Can you show me where I have done either? Be specific, now – no generalizing…

  • 424. Tex Taylor  |  August 25, 2011 at 9:00 pm

    Alfie, I didn’t bother to answer Pfesser’s charges because like Pfesser, this Reason Project is nothing but a bunch of militant humanists craving attention. I had heard of it before, so out of curiosity I went through a portion of the ‘Reason’ list.

    And of the first 22 supposed contradictions, 20 of them I myself could refute without research. A real theologian would tear this chart apart. In addition, the arcs, meant to represent supposed contradictions, don’t enumerate the contradictions or verse.

    It’s nothing but eye candy.

    This Reason Project should be renamed the Parody Project.

  • 425. Tex Taylor  |  August 25, 2011 at 9:26 pm

    It taking a closer look at Pfesser’s Reason Project, and I had to blow it up very large to read closely, it would appear Sam Harris, Richard Dawkins dumber, younger brother didn’t edit his ‘reason’ arc chart very well.

    Pfesser, could you pass on to your militant atheist friends who designed the “Project Reason” chart you’re so fond, that they got all the way to question #8 before they screwed the pooch. Question #9 is a repeat of Question #7 – same question, same verse.

    Or was that meant to be a contradiction of a contradiction? :smile:

    I’m glad Alfie ask that question, because I had forgotten about your foolishness, and it deserved to be mocked.

  • 426. fakename2  |  August 25, 2011 at 9:48 pm

    Here’s an off-topic topic for the off-topic crowd. Tues. I heard a story and interview on NPR with a Baptist minister from Hernando, MS. MS, they said, has the highest rate of heart disease, the second highest rate of diabetes, and the lowest average lifespan in the nation (what? they beat Louisiana?) So this minister is preaching about obesity and encouraged his congregation to bring healthier food to their weekly church suppers. So now they are having grilled or baked chicken instead of fried, and greens without the fatback. I kept waiting for the minister to provide THE biblical reference and he never did, but his first caller did: “The body is the temple of the soul”. That caller btw, had lost 98 lbs. with the help of a similar focus in his own church.
    I had to laugh when my first thought was, I wonder if the resident Christians on the R Blog will think this is a proper focus for Christianity? If it’s “Christian” to encourage people to take care of themselves? And if it is, then why…..is it not okay for Michelle Obama to do the same thing?

  • 427. Tex Taylor  |  August 25, 2011 at 10:07 pm

    I wonder if the resident Christians on the R Blog will think this is a proper focus for Christianity? If it’s “Christian” to encourage people to take care of themselves? And if it is, then why…..is it not okay for Michelle Obama to do the same thing?

    Never heard of gluttony? If it’s sinful to be gluttonous, a form of greed by the way, wouldn’t it be fair to address that in a church about behavior?

    And did the Pastor dictate by fiat that only grilled or baked chicken would acceptable for the entire congregation when served? And did the Pastor ask that other’s pay for the congregation’s grilled or baked chicken, even if they never wanted or needed it?

    I think your question both specious and spurious in its nature. Surprise…

  • 428. poolman  |  August 25, 2011 at 10:13 pm

    Fakename, actually the body is the temple of the Spirit here on earth. We are supposed to honor our flesh, presenting ourselves as living sacrifices to our bridegroom. I don’t expect nonbelievers to understand that, but yes, it is biblical to encourage each other in healthy habits, much as MO has encouraged others.

    Thank God for grace! If grace is an ocean we’re all sinking. :wink:

  • 429. poolman  |  August 25, 2011 at 10:16 pm

    If nothing else, you guys are entertaining as hell. :grin: That comment at 408 cracked me up. LMAO!!!!

  • 430. poolman  |  August 25, 2011 at 10:42 pm

    He was hiding behind the couch the whole time!

    No! No! No! You don’t shove Him behind the furniture. He is supposed to do the rearranging, not vice versa. Otherwise, it’s just all deadwood and not a true living room. Sheesh! Some people’s kids…

  • 431. Tex Taylor  |  August 25, 2011 at 10:57 pm

    ‘Ed Schultz With a Smaller Rack’

    Too cruel. :lol: Another inglorious end to an MSNBC hack, the least watched network on cable. Anybody ever see this telebunny get own by Mo Brooks, (R-AL)? Liberal humiliation at its finest.

    http://theothermccain.com/2011/08/25/ed-schultz-with-a-smaller-rack/

  • 432. Rutherford  |  August 26, 2011 at 12:19 am

    Do you recognize the contradiction in what you said?

    Tigre, unless you consider “intelligent scientific explanation” to be an oxymoron, I don’t see any contradiction.

  • 433. Rutherford  |  August 26, 2011 at 12:26 am

    Don’t judge me until the the day you are asked to “help” someone who raped a baby.

    At the risk of being seen as an apologist for pedo’s Rabbit why do you cite the most rare and ridiculous of cases? Precious few pedo’s (this is my gut speaking, I don’t have the stats) rape babies.

    The fact that you admit to making life harder for pedo offenders doesn’t speak well of you, particularly in the line of work you were in. They might not be capable of rehabilitation but they sure as hell don’t need prison guards (or whatever you were) guaranteeing they won’t be rehabilitated.

    Yeah, that’s just the prescription for any juvenile offender … keep him from getting his GED.

    C’mon man … you know better. :mad:

  • 434. Rutherford  |  August 26, 2011 at 12:29 am

    I’ll be honest. I have been enjoying the slow collapse of Bank of America.

    My mortgage holder when I had a mortgage was B of A. I had this fantasy that they’d get into such legal trouble that they would forgive my loan and I’d own my house outright.

    Hey … I said it was a fantasy. Reality is an apartment in Illinois. :neutral:

  • 435. Rutherford  |  August 26, 2011 at 12:33 am

    Now about this ‘Adult Finder’ thing?

    The stuff I see in my spam folder is wild. The other night I got “are you lonely in Middlebury?” I laughed and said no, I’m not lonely and I’m not in Middlebury anymore.

  • 436. Hucking Fypocrites  |  August 26, 2011 at 12:36 am

    DR’s story reminded me of a news story I once wrote a paper on.

    I argued he deserved it. ;)

  • 437. dead rabbit  |  August 26, 2011 at 12:44 am

    “The fact that you admit to making life harder for pedo offenders doesn’t speak well of you, particularly in the line of work you were in.”-R

    You are right. It wasn’t cool.

    I am a very flawed dude, R.

    One of the reasons I quit. I couldn’t stand the sexual offenders.

    In many ways, it was a nice government job with good pay. There was a routine in place.

  • 438. dead rabbit  |  August 26, 2011 at 12:46 am

    Holy crap. Is that a true story, Hucking?

  • 439. Rutherford  |  August 26, 2011 at 1:00 am

    One of the reasons I quit. I couldn’t stand the sexual offenders.

    The right thing for you to do under the circumstances.

  • 440. Rutherford  |  August 26, 2011 at 1:12 am

    Huck I don’t deny the dude had that tattoo coming but damn, the “cousin” sounded like a real sleaze himself. I would have liked the story more if the cousin had been a tax attorney in there for some white collar sh*t and then went berserk on the pedo-killer. Someone kinda like Bill Foster.

  • 441. Hucking Fypocrites  |  August 26, 2011 at 1:29 am

    Yeah, it was a true story.

    I wrote an awesome paper on it too, if I do say so myself. The professor cried as she read my description of the brutal murder. By the time I got to the MOFO getting inked she was cheering that cousin on.

    I had fun in English: Critical Thinking.

    Rutherford, great scene from a great flick!

  • 442. Hucking Fypocrites  |  August 26, 2011 at 1:54 am

    In that paper I also argued that it is OK for prison guards to allow sex offenders to get beat by other inmates.

    I wrote that it is such a common occurrence that it removes “cruel and unusual punishment” from play because the punishment has to be both cruel and unusual for it to be unconstitutional. (Hey..I’m no lawyer and neither was the prof.)

    That’s what DR’s story reminded me of. I obviously didn’t see it the same way Rutherford did…lol.

  • 443. poolman  |  August 26, 2011 at 3:35 am

    This article is a good assessment of present psychosis:

    As the national narrative shifts from the war on terror to the specter of decline, the uniform performs another psychic function. The military is can-do, the one institution — certainly the one public institution — that still appears to work. The schools, the highways, the post office; Amtrak, FEMA, NASA and the T.S.A. — not to mention the banks, the newspapers, the health care system, and above all, Congress: nothing seems to function anymore, except the armed forces. They’re like our national football team — and undisputed champs, to boot — the one remaining sign of American greatness.

    http://www.nytimes.com/2011/08/21/opinion/sunday/americas-sentimental-regard-for-the-military.html?pagewanted=1&_r=1

  • 444. pfesser53  |  August 26, 2011 at 5:47 am

    poolman –

    Thanks. I think that explains it better than anything I’ve seen.

    Unfortunately, like college football, it takes money away from things that would in reality benefit the people who actually pay the bill.

  • 445. pfesser53  |  August 26, 2011 at 5:56 am

    So now we know where Rick Perry is getting his money:

    http://www.nytimes.com/2011/08/25/opinion/gov-rick-perrys-cash-machine.html?src=me&ref=general

    I SO love exposing these goobers.

  • 446. Alfie  |  August 26, 2011 at 7:08 am

    @PF so not only are you a hater you’re a poser too.

  • 447. Tex Taylor  |  August 26, 2011 at 9:04 am

    Huck & Rutherford, for some reason that Falling Down had a profound effect on me. I’ve often dreamed of living my last day on earth like that. :lol: Minus the wifey thing.

    The movie was panned by critics, but I’ve often thought that was one of Michael Douglas’ best roles. I know we aren’t supposed to laugh at that kind of humor, but come on? Which of us haven’t dreamed of giving uncooperative public a taste of its ultimate comeuppance?

  • 448. El Tigre  |  August 26, 2011 at 9:57 am

    “Tigre, unless you consider “intelligent scientific explanation” to be an oxymoron, I don’t see any contradiction.”

    Sometimes you just lock down, R.

    Hint: you’ve challenged those of faith to produce scientific evidence to persuade you; not the other way around.

    But since you raised the point, “intelligent scientific explanation to support a liberal position” is indeed an oxymoron.

  • 449. dead rabbit  |  August 26, 2011 at 10:03 am

    R, how big is your “apartment”? I bet its still bigger then my house. We call apartments like that “condos”.

  • 450. Tex Taylor  |  August 26, 2011 at 10:08 am

    Yep, just had a Falling Down moment.

    Had blood drawn this morning (LDL) with specific instructions from physician to mail me a copy of the results. I will happily pay the $1.00 charge.

    And the lab tells me it’s a HIPPA violation to do so. Caught me so off guard, I let a “bull shit” slip out of my mouth, which of course pissed the uppity, fat assed nurse off.

    I then furthered her grievance with a simple question, “If it’s a HIPPA violation, why isn’t my own physician aware of it?” That pissed her off further. I asked her, “Who told you that? The Legal Dept., of course.

    So let me get this straight. My own medical records, my own confidential information that I just paid for, and I can’t get access to it without a “written request” and physician approval from the main records office, even if on the request form it said specifically to mail patient a copy?

    Now I’m contemplating making it difficult for their legal department, who already promised me once that they would correct their lab employees, or do I purchase an automatic weapon? :twisted:

    Decisions, decisions…

  • 451. El Tigre  |  August 26, 2011 at 10:12 am

    “Which of us haven’t dreamed of giving uncooperative public a taste of its ultimate comeuppance?”

    That is exactly why the movie was a good one. Anyone that hasn’t had a similar fantasy has no soul.

  • 452. Tex Taylor  |  August 26, 2011 at 10:12 am

    Guess I spelled HIPAA wrong. Must of been the size of the nurse’s ass that confused the spelling the first time. HIPPO…

  • 453. Tex Taylor  |  August 26, 2011 at 10:19 am

    No telling what is being done to my tissue as we speak. Probably a used needle.

    Dr: Sir, we found traces of Hepatitis C, sheep dip, HIV and Meth in your blood samples. You’re under arrest…

    I swear the medical profession is going to hell in this country. My two physicians are great, and both are threatening to leave the profession. The CNA during my mother’s care was great and he probably made all of $10.00 an hour. The surgeon never even followed up with my mom. The nurses sucked hind tit.

    And this is supposedly in a Top 50 rated hospital.

    God help the less fortunate. One wonders what the other places must be like. Rat turd infested, or what?

  • 454. El Tigre  |  August 26, 2011 at 10:23 am

    HIPPA is a disaster.

    I say get an M-16.

  • 455. Pfesser  |  August 26, 2011 at 11:14 am

    re: HIPAA

    We are tangling medicine’s – and especially doctors’ – feet to the point they can’t function – or the good ones get so disgusted they quit and do other things. The HIPAA rules just make physicians subservient to one more pencil-necked paper pusher. I’m damned good and tired of it.

    I plan to work about another ten years at the most and the f*ck it. I don’t have to put up with this bulls*it. I’m a passable welder, good machinist, decent coal miner, decent-if-reluctant farmer, average pilot, flaming libertarian. My wife just came in the office and we discussed what we could do to earn a living when the balloon goes up. In a way, I can’t by-God wait…

  • 456. El Tigre  |  August 26, 2011 at 11:20 am

    Cry me a river PF. . .

  • 457. El Tigre  |  August 26, 2011 at 11:26 am

    An oldie but still true:

    http://networkedblogs.com/lTJkK

  • 458. Tex Taylor  |  August 26, 2011 at 12:06 pm

    :lol: Tigre. I’d never seen that before. I assume it was the cartoon?

    Which begs the question that nobody seems to be asking. What is this “creating jobs equation?” Don’t these stupid mofos understand that we aren’t asking Obama to “create” jobs?

    We’re asking him to stay on vacation and scrub everything he has done to this point.

  • 459. Tex Taylor  |  August 26, 2011 at 12:16 pm

    My favorite funny pundit:

  • 460. Rutherford  |  August 26, 2011 at 12:23 pm

    for some reason that Falling Down had a profound effect on me.

    I absolutely identify with Bill Foster from Falling Down. The stupidity of life slowly builds on you until one day you just pop.

    A couple of weeks ago my kid broke my key ring (I was able to repair it). Her breaking the key ring was just one more straw on top of a building pile on my psyche. I went ballistic … a complete meltdown. The kid doesn’t suffer fools gladly so after her repeated apologies were ignored, she just chalked me up to being an assh*le (nothing new there) and walked away. It was definitely a Bill Foster moment for me.

    I had another at the kid’s gymnastics the other day. Last week we took her there to try out and get placed in the appropriate training program. We had to sign the “if your kid dies it’s not out fault” waiver. We get told later what class she should be in. Fine. We come back the next Monday for the first session and I tell them I’m ready to pay. They hand my wife the same f*cking “not my fault waiver”. She starts to fill it out and I stop her. “This is bullsh*t. We filled this out already. I want the registration form and I want to pay the bill and go.” So I took the form from my wife, only partly filled in and said to one of the coaches “We already filled this out. I need a registration form so I can pay for the session.”

    My wife was livid that I didn’t just go with the flow. She’s an infinitely patient woman. I used to be patient. Not so much anymore. I’m tired of being screwed over and I perceive I’m being screwed over a lot more often than I used to. (LOL I’m thinking as I write this that Tex is ready to schedule a session for me with the nearest shrink.)

  • 461. Rutherford  |  August 26, 2011 at 12:33 pm

    While I am at it, the other thing that is bothering the crap out of me is the way some folks raise their kids. On two occasions my kid has gone to the community playground and the kids already there have totally ignored her. Whatever happened to “my name is Susie, what is yours?” OK I admit that my kid hasn’t made the first move either but I’m still steamed that the other kids act like she’s not even there. I’m going to tell her next time we go to the playground, she is to introduce herself. If they shun her after that then f*ck ‘em.

    My other problem is I’m slowly morphing into a bigot and I feel awful about it. I’ve got to put myself in check. My wife works at home and I hear Indian voices on the damn phone all day long and all I can think is “that’s another American without a goddam job”. The fact that the kids being anti-social to my daughter are Indian just adds to my annoyance. They seem so damn insular.

    I think I am sorely in need of a real vacation. :neutral:

  • 462. poolman  |  August 26, 2011 at 12:40 pm

    Pfesser at 445.

    I did not know much about Perry a few weeks ago. The more I research, the uglier it gets. Sad thing is, this guy is considered a good Christian. Most folks stop at that and don’t dig deeper.

    This is probably the number 1 reason nonbelievers have a tough time taking any of these people seriously – the rank hypocrisy. :twisted:

    No, not for me. I’m definitely going for Ron Paul. The more I find out, the better it gets. :cool:

  • 463. Rutherford  |  August 26, 2011 at 12:40 pm

    R, how big is your “apartment”? I bet its still bigger then my house.

    I seriously doubt that. I think it’s about 1200 square feet. My damn cat follows me around the place. Wasn’t a problem in Middlebury, there was room to walk. Now the mofo is under foot all the time. Of course the unpacked boxes don’t help. :-)

    Speaking of my cat, in the old house his litter box was in the laundry room. Now we have no choice but to put it in my wife and my bathroom under the sink counter. I’m in there brushing my teeth this morning and the dude, totally without couth, walks in and makes a deposit. “Damn, man couldn’t you wait until I finished brushing my teeth?” :mad:

  • 464. Tex Taylor  |  August 26, 2011 at 12:41 pm

    Hell no Rutherford. I’m thinking we could buy a couple of automatic weapons together. I know just where to start.

    I just got back from Wally World – yeah, I know I know. That was my first mistake.

    This fat POS with his greasy pony tail and unkempt beard has his cart right in the middle of the aisle, tats up and down his thunderous legs. I kid you not, he’s got about 10 cases of Starbuck’s Expresso in his cart. Nobody can walk down either side of the aisle, and he just so happens to be standing right in front of what I want. I counted to 30 and he doesn’t move. Won’t move an inch.

    Finally, I’d had enough and moved his cart for him – about 30 ft away down the very end of the aisle and across the main one. I just kept walking. I thought the little old ladies were going to give me a standing ovation. Fat f… doesn’t even know I’ve done until he turns his pudgy ass around and the cart isn’t there. He mutters something unintelligible and while he’s retrieving his cart, I get what I need.

    I was just looking for a fight this morning. I’d have cracked his skull with my Campbell’s soups can if nobody wasn’t looking and they didn’t have cameras. I’m getting really tired of stupid, rude people.

    If I don’t show up here one day, start checking the Tulsa World for road rage articles. I’m probably in the county jail.

  • 465. Rutherford  |  August 26, 2011 at 12:46 pm

    Gotta admit, Tigre … that was a good cartoon. :-)

  • 466. Hucking Fypocrites  |  August 26, 2011 at 1:05 pm

    “I’m tired of being screwed over and I perceive I’m being screwed over a lot more often than I used to.”

    Welcome to last summer’s outrage. There’s always room for 1 more….

  • 467. Tex Taylor  |  August 26, 2011 at 1:39 pm

    Leave it to a Brit with no bias to predict Obama’s Presidency on the very day of the schmuck’s inauguration.

    Barack Obama inauguration: this Emperor has no clothes, it will all end in tears

    It is questionable whether the present political system can survive the coming crisis. Whatever the solution, teenage swooning sentimentality over a celebrity cult has no part in it. The most powerful nation on earth is confronting its worst economic crisis under the leadership of its most extremely liberal politician, who has virtually no experience of federal politics. That is not an opportunity but a catastrophe…

    http://blogs.telegraph.co.uk/news/geraldwarner/8157367/Barack_Obama_inauguration_this_Emperor_has_no_clothes_it_will_all_end_in_tears/

    You men swooning over Ron Paul after you voted for this chump have absolutely no credibility in my book. None…

    All I’m left with is discontent and the thrill of saying, “I told you so.” It’s not enough. :mad:

  • 468. poolman  |  August 26, 2011 at 1:40 pm

    Tex at 464. :lol:

    Funny. I’ve seen that guy, too. Wally world is full of them.

    Any we wonder why the rest of the world no longer takes us seriously? :neutral:

    http://www.peopleofwalmart.com

  • 469. poolman  |  August 26, 2011 at 1:42 pm

    Tex, I certain you voted for McCain, right? ‘Nuff said!

  • 471. Tex Taylor  |  August 26, 2011 at 1:46 pm

    If there were real truth, this would be the Dimocratic Campaign Commercial for 2012:

  • 472. dead rabbit  |  August 26, 2011 at 1:56 pm

    Xenophobic, sick of cat’s shit box, welcome to the lower middle class, R.

    You should have picked Detroit. I would have made you bench coach of my team.

  • 473. Tex Taylor  |  August 26, 2011 at 2:05 pm

    Hey old pal Rutherford,

    Do you remember me saying one of the inherent dangers of high speed rail IMO is its openness to disaster? It was just a couple of months back, maybe not even that far.

    Say Abdul decides to split the rail in Nebraska. And you laughed at me HAR HAR HAR…because it was in the middle of the country and not the almighty, all knowing, avant garde Northeast. Still laughing? :grin:

    http://hosted.ap.org/dynamic/stories/U/US_AMTRAK_DERAILMENT_NEBRASKA?SITE=AP&SECTION=HOME&TEMPLATE=DEFAULT&CTIME=2011-08-26-12-26-22

    Perhaps that move to Chicago will not you out of that cocoon you live in.

  • 474. poolman  |  August 26, 2011 at 2:15 pm

  • 475. Hucking Fypocrites  |  August 26, 2011 at 3:01 pm

    Anyone planning on catching the Bush interview on NatGeo this weekend? The clips I have seen so far are captivating.

  • 476. Hucking Fypocrites  |  August 26, 2011 at 3:16 pm

    Obama says this hurricane could be “historic.”

    I say it already is.

  • 477. Rutherford  |  August 26, 2011 at 3:51 pm

    For all those worried about Sharia law … how ’bout Indian Tribe sovereignty within the US? Now let’s not forget, we did steal the damn nation from them, but I find it interesting that all those troubled by the so called rise of Sharia law, don’t seem to have a problem with the States inability to trump Native American tribal government.

    By the way, I got on this kick because recently the Cherokee Nation decided to kick blacks out of the tribe. Those blacks were descendants of slaves owned by the Cherokee. How do you like that sh*t? An oppressed overthrown population owning other people. I call that pretty f*cked up. It also leads me to wonder why would blacks want to belong to the Cherokee Nation in the first place? Now that Mormons suddenly love black people (God told them He changed His mind) maybe disenfranchised Cherokee blacks should all join the Mormon church if they feel they need to belong to something. ;-)

  • 478. poolman  |  August 26, 2011 at 4:01 pm

    Shill baby, shill.

    Rutherford, weren’t you and Tex just talking about how you thought this asshat was one of the good guys? Well, it may be time for a reassessment.

    Senator Tom Colburn made the following statement at a recent Town Hall meeting in Oklahoma “The average military person, noncombat, retires at 21 years,” he said. “During that time, there are significant benefits and salary that are higher than the average earnings in Oklahoma.” Maybe that’s why only 1.2% of the US population lives down there in the “dust bowl”, and certainly isn’t the fault of the military. Colburn went on the say, “veterans are paying $250 a year for health benefits, through Tri-Care Prime which would cost most other Americans or their employers $1,000 a month or more”. Maybe a true statement, BUT public employees have an even better healthcare program than most private sector employees! That seems a better place to start looking for budget cuts.
    His criticism didn’t stop there regarding “veterans benefits”, as relating to those affected by Agent Orange. He said a 2009 decision to extend Agent Orange benefits to Vietnam War veterans suffering from ischemic heart disease was foolish in that there is no evidence to support the conclusion that heart disease is caused by Agent Orange. Mr. Colburn…it was the decision of the US Military to use Agent Orange and other toxins, and therefore carries with it, the need to care for everyone who was exposed to it.

  • 479. Rutherford  |  August 26, 2011 at 4:02 pm

    Huck, I think Cheney’s interview on NBC Monday (?) night might be more entertaining. He even throws Bush under the bus. Nice guy huh?

  • 480. Hucking Fypocrites  |  August 26, 2011 at 4:23 pm

    I am not interested in being entertained. I am interested in hearing what George W. Bush, the man and the president, has to say about the day of September 11, 2001.

  • 481. Hucking Fypocrites  |  August 26, 2011 at 4:31 pm

    “How do you like that sh*t? An oppressed overthrown population owning other people. I call that pretty f*cked up.”

    The people around here aren’t interested in your revisionist analyses, Rutherford. This was par for the time and others were being treated worse. That’s really all that matters. :rolleyes:

  • 482. Tex Taylor  |  August 26, 2011 at 4:36 pm

    He said a 2009 decision to extend Agent Orange benefits to Vietnam War veterans suffering from ischemic heart disease was foolish in that there is no evidence to support the conclusion that heart disease is caused by Agent Orange. Mr. Colburn

    Always suspicious whenever the hack can’t spell the name correctly. And I’ll second what Coburn says. Our military deserves every benefit – they don’t need junk science, bad medicine or some pretend Veteran shilling for htem.

    Do we forget that Vietnam ended 36 years ago? Ischemic heart disease after 36 years of exposure? Bull shit…it’s called aging Pool Mold.

    Figures that came from your fellow hating American today “disabled Vet”, who watched born on the 4th of July one too many times and lives in fantasy world.

    ET, call home.

  • 483. poolman  |  August 26, 2011 at 4:44 pm

    I am not interested in being entertained. I am interested in hearing what George W. Bush, the man and the president, has to say about the day of September 11, 2001.

    Me too, especially since he has related different accounts in the past.

  • 484. Hucking Fypocrites  |  August 26, 2011 at 4:57 pm

    It’s not uncommon for individuals to remember things differently when recounting past events. It doesn’t mean they are or were lying.

  • 485. poolman  |  August 26, 2011 at 5:06 pm

    Do we forget that Vietnam ended 36 years ago?

    Ended for whom?

  • 486. poolman  |  August 26, 2011 at 5:09 pm

    Onward Christian soldiers…

  • 487. Rutherford  |  August 26, 2011 at 5:12 pm

    Poolman, maybe my memory fails me but I recall seeing video of the first plane hitting the tower on the day it happened. I agree it wasn’t caught live but I don’t remember having to wait a full day to see the first plane hit. And of course, the second plane was caught live because by then the media were filming the flaming first tower.

  • 488. Tex Taylor  |  August 26, 2011 at 5:12 pm

    The nation’s second-largest Indian tribe formally booted from membership thousands of descendants of black slaves who were brought to Oklahoma more than 170 years ago by Native American owners.

    Where be Rev. Al racing to play head victim?

    You should have heard the whining down here. Competing to the be at the bottom of most oppressed. Indians are going to buy all of the ‘white man’s’ land back through the casinos. :lol:

  • 489. Tex Taylor  |  August 26, 2011 at 5:15 pm

    Ended for whom?

    Everyone is a victim…

  • 490. Rutherford  |  August 26, 2011 at 5:21 pm

    The people around here aren’t interested in your revisionist analyses, Rutherford. This was par for the time and others were being treated worse. That’s really all that matters. :rolleyes:

    Other than you’re being generally snarky (what? ran out of milk for your Wheaties this morning?), I have no idea what you’re talking about. What’s revisionist about it? And I was quite surprised to learn Native Americans owned black slaves. I never knew it and assumed it would never have happened.

    As for Cheney and Bush … I’m not sure what you hope to learn from the Bush 9/11 retro. Hasn’t he covered most of this already on his book tour? Putting aside the breadth of history covered by Cheney (from Ford’s chief of staff right up to his Darth Vader days) it is amazing to watch the unrepentant bastard look at Jamie Gangell with that death stare of his and recount how he was in charge during 9/11 (Al Haig,, calling Al Haig …. someone has stolen your shtick. Please come pick it up at the concierge’s desk.)

  • 491. Rutherford  |  August 26, 2011 at 5:24 pm

    Well Tex I gotta tell ya, finding out that Indians owned blacks makes me a lot less sympathetic to their “plight”. F*ck em …. smallpox infested blankets for every last one of them. :evil:

  • 492. Tex Taylor  |  August 26, 2011 at 6:04 pm

    F*ck em …. smallpox infested blankets for every last one of them. :evil:

    :lol: Now, that’s my boy! Let’s go buy those assault rifles and have some fun. We’ll go out in a blaze of glory together. Corporate America, Washington D.C., or New York City and Wall Street.

    You pick…

  • 493. Tex Taylor  |  August 26, 2011 at 6:14 pm

    This is one of the more disturbing commentaries I have read….

    http://pajamasmedia.com/zombie/2011/08/26/brave-new-world-arrives-ahead-of-schedule-sex-indoctrination-for-toddlers/#comment-128438

  • 494. Rutherford  |  August 26, 2011 at 7:05 pm

    We’ll go out in a blaze of glory together.

    The 2011 sequel to Thelma and Louise:

    Rutherford and Tex :-)

  • 495. Tex Taylor  |  August 26, 2011 at 7:35 pm

    The 2011 sequel to Thelma and Louise:

    Rutherford and Tex :-)

    Right! I’ll use my last few dollars to buy some old convertible and we’ll go off the cliff together!

  • 496. poolman  |  August 26, 2011 at 8:31 pm

    Poolman, maybe my memory fails me but I recall seeing video of the first plane hitting the tower on the day it happened.

    There is “officially” only one video of the first plan hitting the north tower, taken by Jules Naudet, a film crew making a documentary at the time. That first aired on TV the next day, just after midnight.

  • 497. poolman  |  August 26, 2011 at 8:41 pm

    FYI: Interesting information regarding that video. Later versions are edited to remove the first 3 or 4 frames and removes the flash just before impact.

    NIST has released much of the video they had in their possession because of FOIA requests. So now there are a lot more videos available on the internet. However, many of those videos have some frames and audio edited out. That just adds more fuel to the fire, no pun intended.

    I’ve also been going through a lot of the original television broadcasts. The narrative is surreal.

  • 498. Hucking Fypocrites  |  August 26, 2011 at 9:28 pm

    “Other than you’re being generally snarky (what? ran out of milk for your Wheaties this morning?), I have no idea what you’re talking about.”

    I guess you missed that exchange here between me and pretty much everyone else. I said something from 1941 was messed up and I got hammered.

    “Hasn’t he covered most of this already on his book tour?”

    Haven’t read it and didn’t catch him talking about it.

  • 499. Hucking Fypocrites  |  August 26, 2011 at 9:47 pm

    PM, I like that gravitar. I always felt they should have either rebuilt the WTC as it was or done what is in that picture.

  • 500. poolman  |  August 26, 2011 at 10:44 pm

    Thanks, Huck. I do like the beams of light.

    I read this article and though it might resonate with you. Of course the source where it is found is biased, but then again, aren’t they all?

    Understanding the opposition to NATO’s intervention in Libya

  • 501. poolman  |  August 26, 2011 at 10:51 pm

    I don’t know if it is my lack of typing skills, or this new wireless made-in-china keyboard, but I seem to have left off a few letters back there.

    Please put an “e” in plan in 496 to make plane and a “t” in though in 500 to make thought. Thanks!

    Rutherford,

    This thread is getting _ _s_l_o_w _2_ l_o_a_d_____

    Hint…hint… :wink:

  • 502. Tex Taylor  |  August 26, 2011 at 11:30 pm

    I’m not a big Donald Trump fan, but I always thought his suggestion for the replacement of the WTC was the best I’ve heard.

    Build it just like them, only one story higher.

  • 503. Tex Taylor  |  August 26, 2011 at 11:41 pm

    I would expect no less from Dead Rabbit…

    http://www.badassoftheweek.com/lozito.html

    I nominate The Rabbit as Rutherford Lawson’s bad ass of the week. 800lbs Gorilla is on deck.

  • 504. dead rabbit  |  August 27, 2011 at 12:00 am

    Tex, that site instantly went into my favorites.

    The weird thing about being a big guy, is you kind of forget it until someone points out another guy exactly your size.

    Man, I wouldn’t want to fuck with me.
    :)

  • 505. dead rabbit  |  August 27, 2011 at 12:01 am

    If that was me I would have gone for an epic knock out via left hook, tripped and got my Adam’s apple stabbed out of my throat.

  • 506. Tex Taylor  |  August 27, 2011 at 12:17 am

    If that was me I would have gone for an epic knock out via left hook, tripped and got my Adam’s apple stabbed out of my throat.

    :lol: Only if you didn’t connect. Me? I’d have run like a mofo and thrown some little girl in my path.

    Give me three steps, give me three steps Mister…

  • 507. Rutherford  |  August 27, 2011 at 12:38 am

    Switzerland teaches sexual pleasure to kindergarteners. Gotta love it. Tex, thanks for a great article link that complements this post perfectly.

  • 508. Rutherford  |  August 27, 2011 at 12:42 am

    I guess you missed that exchange here between me and pretty much everyone else. I said something from 1941 was messed up and I got hammered.

    Ahhhh that’s what you were referring to. LOL Got it.

  • 509. dead rabbit  |  August 27, 2011 at 12:44 am

    I connect with this guy. He’s the type of boss I enjoy working for while respect when he tears me into a new asshole.

  • 510. Rutherford  |  August 27, 2011 at 12:46 am

    This thread is getting _ _s_l_o_w _2_ l_o_a_d_____

    I know … don’t rub it in. I meant to write a new post today and do some other work and it never got done. On the bright side, I ended up doing something else that needed to be done that I hadn’t planned on doing.

    Hopefully a new post this weekend. :-(

  • 511. dead rabbit  |  August 27, 2011 at 12:49 am

    I think I would volunteer Chris Christie’s campaign. He’d probably love to have me, being a union teacher and all.

    Union Teachers for Christie.

    I bet I’d get some hate male, but, I also bet none of the fembots at work would say shit to my face. Plus, a few would join me.

  • 512. dead rabbit  |  August 27, 2011 at 12:51 am

    “Ahhhh that’s what you were referring to. LOL Got it.”

    Come one Rutherford. How did you not get that? Everyone knows that when Hucking walks down the Rutherford Lawson hallway, us jocks knock his fancy books out of his hands.

  • 513. dead rabbit  |  August 27, 2011 at 12:52 am

    hate mail

  • 514. poolman  |  August 27, 2011 at 1:03 am

    This was awesome! I posted at M&H, but that crowd has thinned out again to just a couple folks. Chris Matthews quotes, etc. The Howard Zinn was especially poignant. Enjoy…

    In My Time Lies And Quotes From Cheney And Neocon Pundits

    And you think the earth is shaking now? Have plenty of popcorn to go around. :grin:

  • 515. Hucking Fypocrites  |  August 27, 2011 at 1:06 am

    “Everyone knows that when Hucking walks down the Rutherford Lawson hallway, us jocks knock his fancy books out of his hands.”

    And then you usually get your asses kicked.

  • 516. Rutherford  |  August 27, 2011 at 1:10 am

    us jocks knock his fancy books out of his hands.

    LOL we are a funny collection aren’t we? Lawyers, badass teachers, academics, conspiracy theorists/anarchists, porno industry advocates, military strategists and at least a couple of middle aged guys burned by corporate America and calling their own shots now.

    This blog may be great, or this blog may suck but you can’t deny I’ve collected one wild assortment of dudes and dudettes. :-)

  • 517. Rutherford  |  August 27, 2011 at 1:12 am

    And then you usually get your asses kicked.

    Huck, have you watched “Revenge of the Nerds” one too many times? ;-)

  • 518. poolman  |  August 27, 2011 at 1:41 am

  • 519. PFesser  |  August 27, 2011 at 8:23 am

    “The weird thing about being a big guy, is you kind of forget it until someone points out another guy exactly your size.

    Man, I wouldn’t want to fuck with me.”

    Not that great a thing, actually. From experience in the pool halls of the WV Coalfields I can tell you: The problem with that is that a smaller guy won’t bother to try to whip your ass. He’ll just wrap a pool cue around your head – and failing that, he’ll put a hole in your chest about the size of a softball.

    The best thing is to keep your mouth shut and drink your beer.

  • 520. dead rabbit  |  August 27, 2011 at 11:12 am

    I’ve only had a gun pointed to my head once (not counting times driving in the car) and that had nothing to with my size or attitude. It was because I was white. My other white white friend who was with me at the time had to get on his knees and suck the pistol. I left him there and ran.

    I have been stabbed once, but it was through a winter coat and was a minor injury.

    I’ve been maced.

    I was beaten to a pulp fair and square by a North Californian logger half my size. This required me getting a nose job 5 years later.

    The second worse time was when three Samoans used me as an instrument to destroy a bar, beating my ass the entire time. They had to shut down the bar 20 minutes early because of the damage my flying body caused. These guys beat me up with open slaps. The first open slap hit me right in the nose and my eyes welled up to the point of being blind.

    That’s my weak spot, my nose. And Samoans. And loggers. And blacks wielding Snub Nose 38’s.

  • 521. poolman  |  August 27, 2011 at 11:15 am

    PFesser,

    How are things holding up there in your area this morn?

    http://tidesandcurrents.noaa.gov/quicklook/data/IRENE.html

    It appears to be getting very close to you. YIKES!!! Stay hunkered down and safe!

    It’s a good time to be in Arizona! :neutral:

  • 522. poolman  |  August 27, 2011 at 11:30 am

    Rabbit,

    I guess being big puts you in more fights. It seems to be the case for some of my friends that are.

    My last physical fight was 8th grade. I don’t even remember what started it, other than it seemed fighting was a normal day to day occurrence in that school. The school was very cliquish and gang fights happened during lunch and after school almost everyday. The demographics were about 1/3 Mexicans, 1/3 whites Asians and others, and 1/3 blacks.

    We both were pretty evenly matched and just very bruised and sore the next day. No broken bones or cuts.

    I haven’t had any physical confrontations in the 40 years since. I think it’s because my guardian angel is so frikkin’ huge! :wink:

  • 523. Alfie  |  August 27, 2011 at 12:25 pm

    My final comments on this thread:
    First and foremost Rutherford I offer a much belated comment on your actual post.
    I liked this post and found it to be well presented. This post displayed those signs of Rutherford talent you’ve shown before.I found the two story tie in to be done well and obviously as a parent and my politics I liked your epiphany re the Bert and Ernie thing.
    Huck,upon further review I think I misunderstood your position re Texas. You are clearly more Perry specific and I went elsewhere. Not really an apology but just an acknowledgment kind of thing.
    Poolman No I’m neither employed by the govt. nor do I receive benefits from the Feds. I’m a big fan of history and believe I am personally the most Real Politik person on these threads. By that I mean I put aside ideas such as morality on any given issue unlike say Tex or Huck and perhaps you and PF as well. I don’t offer that as a slight to anyone else,in fact it is a sign of how damaged a human I am and I’m quite fine with that. So whether it is nuking Japanese civilians of locking up citizens my world view is not hampered by thoughts of fair,moral or other humanity handicaps.
    As this pertains to your conspiracy theories. Pearl Harbor specific.
    Combined history TROUNCES the FDR conspiracy. Churchill, Nanking,Naval Treaty,Imperial Japanese expansion and historically sound rebuttals re codes etc. All trounce the conspiracy.
    PF My earlier comment to you was quite sincere. You seem hostile towards Christianity specifically. Let’s try this again,ignore if you will. Are you a total atheist/rationalist? I am honestly curious.

  • 524. Alfie  |  August 27, 2011 at 12:28 pm

    Oh yeah btw. As a tall person most of my problems/confrontations have always been due to a small person having an attitude.

  • 525. dead rabbit  |  August 27, 2011 at 12:30 pm

    I was thinking about when we talking about the Japanese camps during WW2.

    Obviously wrong, unconstitutional etc.

    Also obviously minor compared to what many other government deemed acceptable at the time. But, like Hucking says, who cares, wrong is wrong.

    When I was in high-school, our teacher had Japanese Americans who endured the camps come talk to us.

    Here’s where things get messed up. In order to have someone visit the class, it takes another day of class kind of preparing for the visit…the back ground info, etc.

    Now, usually, the class spends another day breaking down what the speaker taught us.

    You only have 4 or 5 days to really cover WW2.

    So, what was the main lesson driven into our skulls about WW2? The travesty of Japanese internment.

    Our teacher was no liberal America hater either. He was a Korean War vet himself.

  • 526. dead rabbit  |  August 27, 2011 at 12:42 pm

    Man….so I’ve been paying attention to Bert and Ernie.

    Either I’m having a conservative “Yellow Tella-Tubby” moment, or Sesame Street is purposely including innuendos.

    Bert and Ernie have a segment on every show in which they have an adventure. They aren’t puppets, it’s more of a claymation kind of thing.

    Every episode ends with the bed being dropped in their room, and Ernie mounting Bert, while Bert’s eyes open wide.

    Watch the start and the end.

    They also are making references to things that the government is going to do to us in the future. Ok, I made that up.

    Thanks Rutherford. You’ve ruined Sesame Street for me.

  • 527. poolman  |  August 27, 2011 at 1:33 pm

    I love articles that challenge traditional thought. This was a very good one, I think. For him who has ears to hear…

    http://www.sott.net/articles/show/234057-The-War-on-Error-Sticky-Business-in-the-Battle-of-Science-vs-Religion

  • 528. poolman  |  August 27, 2011 at 1:44 pm

    Alfie,

    I’m sorry. I pegged you from your comments and avatar as being a part of the military, past or present. As a history buff, you ought to appreciate the last article I linked, since history has been written by men and what has survived is the accepted versions that align with precepts of today’s people in charge of ideas and institutions.

    Personally, I know mankind well enough to not trust “them” to operate with neutrality in any given circumstance. That’s why I like to use the word MANipulate™, much to rabbit’s dismay. :grin:

  • 529. dead rabbit  |  August 27, 2011 at 2:11 pm

    The most annoying thing about Poolman his that he thinks he is some kind of “Gadfly,” pushing us to think outside of the box.

    He has no clue how boring his cereal box conspiracies are.

  • 530. poolman  |  August 27, 2011 at 2:17 pm

    That Bert and Ernie is MANipulate™, too. It may reflect the artists’ and writers’ POV, or be a part of a larger scheme of psy-ops to MANipulate™ the public by shaping our youth while mommy and daddy stay busy with required duties of “living” in a “free” society.

    It’s likely better for them to be playing Warcraft. :twisted:

  • 531. poolman  |  August 27, 2011 at 2:20 pm

  • 532. Pfesser  |  August 27, 2011 at 2:35 pm

    poolman –
    Thanks for the concern. We are inland a bit and haven’t had anything much. Some pretty good winds, but my house is surrounded by tall trees at about 100yds away on one side and 200yds on the other three. I’m seeing the tops sway back and forth considerably, but at my house proper I’d say max of about 30 mph, in gusts only, with steady winds of about 15mph. I’ve only been here about 5 years and it is the first really good lesson I’ve had on how much trees block the wind. Minimal rain so far, but we expect more. No t-storms yet, so no worries about tornadoes. My stepdaughter and granddaughter (2yrs old) are visiting from DC and decided to stay a couple of days extra; the idea of being in that hellhole with no power and chaos all around is pretty scary.

    p.s. I LOVE Arizona.

    Alfie –
    “PF My earlier comment to you was quite sincere. You seem hostile towards Christianity specifically. Let’s try this again,ignore if you will. Are you a total atheist/rationalist? I am honestly curious.”

    Sorry, must have missed your comment. Lots to do this week “off work;” not much time to read all the comments.

    I find all the desert religions to be extremely dangerous. That would include Christianity, Judaism and Islam. The Jews I give a little break; I like them very much because IMHO they have – and continue to – contribute so much to science and the humanities.

    Thanks for the question; I hadn’t really thought about it much. I guess my problems are several:

    Firstly, religion is so completely irrational. If you were to propose such a fairy tale concerning ANYTHING else, you would be laughed right out of business. It really bothers me that humans can be so rational about almost everything and at the same time completely blind to how silly such fairy tales really sound. If I tried to explain to you how airplanes fly by the same kind of stuff (“magic”), you’d lose your mind. But it’s perfectly fine to assert that one’s religious myths as REAL and TRUE, yet at the same time, everybody ELSE’s myths are, well…myths. Makes me crazy.

    Secondly, not only are religious folks irrational, they are unwaveringly certain. There is no reasoning with these people because they KNOW the answers and they get them from an irrefutable source; that internal “could I possibly be wrong?” switch is OFF. That makes them really dangerous IMHO, because they never self-check. It’s really about having no conscience, because no matter what you do, it’s OK if God SAID it’s OK. Tell me that is not scary.

    Thirdly, history is replete with examples of how, when religion gets involved with the State, it has been perverted to justify the commission of unspeakable evil. Today I see America heading down that well-travelled road once again as the Dominionists – and just ordinary folk – see absolutely nothing wrong with declaring America a “Christian nation” and doing whatever it takes to bring that about.

    Sorry – kind of long, but I think that sums it up. To finally answer your initial question – yes, absolutely. Totally atheist, total rationalist.

  • 533. poolman  |  August 27, 2011 at 2:41 pm

    I meant:

    Bert and Ernie is MANipulative™, too.

    OMG, rabbit. You ought to read the ingredients on this cereal box.

  • 534. poolman  |  August 27, 2011 at 2:54 pm

    PFesser,

    Hopefully you guys will continue to have power where you’re at. My mom lives in SC near Greenville. They are usually well-sheltered from these storms, also.

    Sure makes one feel puny in comparison to such natural forces, eh?

  • 535. Tex Taylor  |  August 27, 2011 at 4:06 pm

    Thirdly, history is replete with examples of how, when religion gets involved with the State, it has been perverted to justify the commission of unspeakable evil.

    Like Communist and godless China, Cambodia and the USSR? The 20th century is replete with godless countries that had the worst mass murders in recorded history. If we only measure what is most easily proven of the last 150 years, countries with no religion have a far worse track of human rights.

    Today I see America heading down that well-travelled road once again as the Dominionists – and just ordinary folk – see absolutely nothing wrong with declaring America a “Christian nation” and doing whatever it takes to bring that about.

    Except like my article pointed out the other day, the entire concept of Dominionist is a laughable red herring, with all the supposed converts fitting in a telephone booth. I though we had already proven that. You might as well use Heaven’s Gate as your example.

    In addition, American is a Christian nation in that the vast majority of people call themselves Christian. The Constitution, while secular in the sense it allows one to worship or not worship any way they see fit, guarantees the right of choice. And our Declaration of Independence is most definitely religious in nature.

    To finally answer your initial question – yes, absolutely. Totally atheist, total rationalist.

    In your opinion which though you entitled to, doesn’t make it right. Most Americans still find it is you that is completely irrational, as the vast majority of Americans do believe in the divine.

  • 536. poolman  |  August 27, 2011 at 4:08 pm

    :lol: “The Jezebel of state Hillary

    even visited Quito to “assess”the situation and tried to convince Correa and friends not to go Hugo Chavez on them. It is said that USAID put up $40 million for “the cause” of banksters. In the end the “Obama administration” pulled back and at an emergency meeting in Buenos Aires, choosing not to publicly condemn the Ecuador Populism.
    Much other chicanery has occurred in Ecuador, unreported by whores, of course; I guess that is why we have Internet.
    It is a sad state of affairs that the American Public has neither the brains nor the gumption to see that the Federal Reserve private Banksters have saddled millions of productive taxpaying citizens with Trillions in Odious debt.
    Unless you think all the lying wars were valid, you must know the debt today is totally ODIOUS .
    If Ron Paul is serious about being President he could go to the people and tell them he will forgive all US debts government and personal, that were accrued by the Odious practices of the banksters. This should include all the mortgage liabilities caused by the “bubble” described many times by Paul.
    Using the concept of “Equal protection under the law” this must apply to all citizens.
    Thanks to the audits of the Fed, recently exposed, we can see that more than $16 trillion in alleged US dollars just floated into the world. Surely the interest on that alone has more than a little odor.

    http://www.veteranstoday.com/2011/08/27/odious-debt-odious-debt-odious-debt/

  • 537. Rutherford  |  August 27, 2011 at 4:27 pm

    To Poolman: I like to refer to HIStory because that is all history is: his story. And the further back we go, the more fiction gets tossed into the mix. I don’t believe in objective history. It has impacted my interest in history overall because the older I get the less I believe any of the official accounts.

    One key event in my change of attitude toward history was finding out MLK Jr was a philanderer. The man can’t keep his dick in his pants but he’s a national hero. I know he fought for grand causes but his lack of self control brought him down several pegs in my book. You don’t learn that in history. I don’t recall being taught about Japanese internment either.

    History does not equal TRUTH.

  • 538. Rutherford  |  August 27, 2011 at 4:37 pm

    Tex let’s put religion aside a minute. If a sane man walks into a mental ward he is far outnumbered by delusional people. Does that make him no longer sane? You cannot justify the “sanity” of religion with numbers. I’m sure Pfesser would tell you truly rational people are few and far between.

  • 539. poolman  |  August 27, 2011 at 4:45 pm

    History does not equal TRUTH.

    And a big AMEN to that. If anything it clouds it.

    But the biggest issue folks have, yourself included, is you are looking for perfection in a human being, like MLK. No one, except God Himself, is perfect. Some of the greatest people that shaped our lives and society were some of the most imperfect.

    Even the Bible points to that. All its “heroes”, with the exception of God Himself, were greatly flawed. That, to me, shows a more accurate view. Humanity is “as is”. Accept it and play the cards you are dealt. Humility beats pride, everytime.

    When we separate ourselves into tribes, we loose sight of our strengths as a race. Instead of pointing out the major flaws we see in others, we should rather emphasize their talents.

    It isn’t the proper mentality in this “dog eat dog” world. But then a dog, big or otherwise, wasn’t never declared king of the jungle. :wink:

  • 540. dead rabbit  |  August 27, 2011 at 4:56 pm

    How do you think you learned about MLK’s philandering, you dum dum?

    Because a historian went back, used evidence, and documented it.

    You’re saying you don’t like history because historians keep learning new things about said subject.

    Obviously history doesn’t measure up to a scientific theory or mathematics.

    You have no problems being less rigorous when it comes to evolution, the nature of a baby in the womb or global warming, but oh man….no one told you Indians owned slaves and MLK liked to cheat.

  • 541. dead rabbit  |  August 27, 2011 at 5:10 pm

    come on R….forget Illinois. Look at the fun we have here.

  • 542. Tex Taylor  |  August 27, 2011 at 5:59 pm

    If a sane man walks into a mental ward he is far outnumbered by delusional people. Does that make him no longer sane? You cannot justify the “sanity” of religion with numbers.

    I’ve heard of bad analogies, but that was one of the worst. I am to assume that most people in America or around the world are insane? Or are most people in mental wards?

    I think you need to flip the script, with perhaps yourself as the one sitting in the mental ward. Ever listened to Richard Dawkins closely? The man is complete loon, with an angry streak.

    Everything happened “by chance” and by “random mutation.” Worse, you’ve got to believe something came from nothing.

    Perhaps that is why I think you have a hard time looking past the emptiness of Obama. You want to believe, but reality bites.

  • 543. Rutherford  |  August 27, 2011 at 6:04 pm

    Rabbit, that clip SO reminds me of Soul Train. :-)

  • 544. Rutherford  |  August 27, 2011 at 6:08 pm

    Worse, you’ve got to believe something came from nothing.

    Here’s a mind blower —- do you believe in infinity? What if there actually was no “beginning”? Maybe in some way, shape or form, stuff has ALWAYS been here?

    Sit back, smoke a doobie, and ponder that one maaaaan!

  • 545. Rutherford  |  August 27, 2011 at 6:21 pm

    Thanks Rutherford. You’ve ruined Sesame Street for me.

    Rabbit you neglected to warn me that Bert was topless through most of the video. Oh the humanity! :shock:

  • 546. pfesser53  |  August 27, 2011 at 6:32 pm

    Rutherford –

    When dealing with Creationists, always look for the “It happened by chance” argument. It’s the mark of a man who doesn’t know what he’s talking about, since evolutionary theory says no such thing.

    Red, red, crimson red……..herring.

  • 547. pfesser53  |  August 27, 2011 at 6:50 pm

    R – a pretty good analogy, that. Sane man in an asylum. There is some evolutionary advantage to superstition, I’m sure – otherwise religious fervor wouldn’t be so widespread. (Although another line of thought might be that, since religion is really about consolidating power and profit (Paine), religion is really just another political party which has become very powerful by causing the governments to give it special privileges – primarily financial. It therefore has the ability to prosthelytize incessantly, since its income and investments compound tax-free, giving it the resources it needs to constantly bombard the populace with propaganda. One wonders how long religion would last if it didn’t constantly dose the devout with more holy-water.)

    My very crude, off-the-cuff theory is that religion evolved because it allowed the primitive man to compartmentalize those things he understood and could do something about from those he could not. Rather than being overwhelmed by anxiety – since primitive man understood very little – he just invented an invisible friend (or 200) who was going to take care of all that for him. Just my surmise; I’m sure the real reason will be worked out eventually.

    No doubt about it – the predisposition to superstition is very much universal – throughout mankind, throughout the ages. Those like myself, who could never practice self-delusion or participate in mass hysteria are completely baffled by it, nonetheless.

  • 548. Tex Taylor  |  August 27, 2011 at 10:09 pm

    Those like myself, who could never practice self-delusion or participate in mass hysteria are completely baffled by it, nonetheless.

    The man who founded Jerusalem 3,000 years ago by the name of King David (whom almost all Jews revere – the same Jews my antagonist admires), had a name for men that denied God. So did Paul and Peter. And you guys might as well call Jesus a liar and loon too.

    But the word used to describe men like you and Pfesser time after time is:

    Fool.

    So Rutherford, who you going to believe? A militant atheist with a massive degree of loopiness, conspiracy theorists of crazed Christians called Dominionists overtaking America (look out, there’s one), or Jesus and Billy Graham, St. Peter and St. Paul, King David, King Solomon, Newton, Copernicus, Mendel, Galileo?

    Tough choice, hey?

  • 549. PFesser  |  August 27, 2011 at 10:16 pm

    Kind of reminds me of the Irishman who – upon hearing there were a dozen witnesses to his crime – offered to go out and find *thirteen* people who had *not* seen him kill the man.

  • 550. Hucking Fypocrites  |  August 27, 2011 at 11:35 pm

    I see some names in that list who would have also call Jesus a liar.

  • 551. Tex Taylor  |  August 27, 2011 at 11:59 pm

    Want to place a bet before you name them?

  • 552. Rutherford  |  August 28, 2011 at 12:22 am

    I’m embarassed I had to go to wiki to confirm my memory of this but Tex why in the world did you list Galileo? The man was condemned as a heretic for contradicting the ignorant RELIGIOUS belief that the Earth was the center of the solar system.

  • 553. dead rabbit  |  August 28, 2011 at 12:32 am

    I think Hucking is referring to King David and King Solomon?

  • 554. poolman  |  August 28, 2011 at 12:34 am

    Galileo was extremely “religious.” The fact that the organized church rejected his “new revelation” had nothing to do with his faith. They were stuck in their dogma. It happens all the time. That is why there are so many factions in the church. Back then it was a crime of heresy because the church governed the land.

    No different that Sharia or Talmudic or a theocracy…

  • 555. poolman  |  August 28, 2011 at 12:35 am

    Galileo was extremely “religious.” The fact that the organized church rejected his “new revelation” had nothing to do with his faith. They were stuck in their dogma. It happens all the time. That is why there are so many factions in the church. Back then it was a crime of heresy because the church governed the land.

    No different than Sharia or Talmudic or a theocracy…

  • 556. poolman  |  August 28, 2011 at 12:42 am

    Oops, sorry about the double post, Rutherford. You can delete the first as I was trying to correct a word. :neutral:

    Our church service tonight was very pertinent to the conversation we are having. I am going to email you a link, Rutherford, after they post it online. Usually by Tuesday. If you are able to view and take it in, it will better explain much of what we have been discussing. My pastor did a great job and I couldn’t even get close to explaining it as succinctly.

    Tex, did you see the article regarding the completion of the restoration of the walls around Jerusalem? They expect to have it completed by the end of the year. Much was the original stone that was reused. Cool stuff.

  • 557. poolman  |  August 28, 2011 at 1:44 am

    Because of empty promises to the indigenous Palestinians, come September, a diplomatic intifada [Arabic for rise up and cast off] could well erupt in the United Nations when President of the Palestinian Authority, Mahmud Abbas, submits a formal request to the Security Council for UN recognition and membership for the State of Palestine.
    President Obama indicated that he would use the U.S. veto to block the initiative.
    Of the 193 UN members, 122 already recognize Palestinian statehood. Israel has diplomatic relations with 156 states.

    Interesting times, indeed. Who are the real terrorists?
    Where does it say, “we will know them by their white hats and superior firepower?” I can certainly say the fruit is pretty tainted. :sad:

    Israel is NOT and NEVER was a Democracy:

    “The terms ‘democracy’ or ‘democratic’ are totally absent from the Declaration of Independence. This is not an accident. The intention of Zionism was not to bring democracy, needless to say. It was solely motivated by the creation in Eretz-Isrel of a Jewish state belonging to all the Jewish people and to the Jewish people alone. This is why any Jew of the Diaspora has the right to immigrate to Israel and to become a citizen of Israel.”- Ariel Sharon

  • 558. poolman  |  August 28, 2011 at 2:06 am

    Here is another short and interesting take on atheism. This from a pantheist POV.

    Observations on Atheism

    Time and time again I can’t help but notice the parallels between atheists and religious types: the bitter hostility towards anyone who doesn’t just choke down their ideology; the inconsistent belief system and subsequent rationalizations that sidestep the issue by exploiting our human emotions.

    [...]

    If you sincerely want to show people the error of their ways, specifically in regard to the Apocalyptic “literalist,” you’re not going to do it by calling them “EVIL” — all name-calling will ever accomplish is make them more fanatical. The best you can do is espouse an alternate interpretation of the Apocalypse and hope for the best. Like maybe start by pointing out the original Greek translation of “Apocalypse” LITERALLY means “lifting of the veil”; a disclosure of something hidden from the majority of mankind. Far from being a horrible experience, Apocalypse represents the revealing of the true nature of things. It ushers in an era of forgotten freedoms and unprecedented clarity. This “lifting of the veil” will set us free from the misery that has been a result of our ignorance in an era dominated by falsehood and misconception.

  • 559. pfesser53  |  August 28, 2011 at 6:57 am

    poolman –

    I don’t think most atheists *hate* religion. Those that I know find it silly and irrational and they are genuinely baffled by it, but they certainly don’t hate it. Personally, I am puzzled by folks who are perfectly rational in every other way but see no paradox in their believing something that, if it were about *anything* else, they themselves would roll their eyes and scoff. If your kid made up such a wild and convoluted story as is seen in any “holy” book, you’d just roll your eyes and say, “What an imagination!” It’s all just an empty story, like all the other empty stories humans have believed in over the centuries, yet you almost never see any of these folks wonder if it’s possible their particular story is no different from the two hundred or so other ones.

    That would all be well and good – and just amusing – if those folks stayed in their little sandbox, and if they are willing to do that, it’s fine by me – they can believe whatever they want. But when they start venturing into politics – which they invariably do – then they are dangerous. History shows that mixing politics with religion is always a lethal combination and when that happens it becomes MY problem. And they have a fight on their hands.

  • 560. Tex Taylor  |  August 28, 2011 at 10:24 am

    That would all be well and good – and just amusing – if those folks stayed in their little sandbox, and if they are willing to do that, it’s fine by me – they can believe whatever they want. But when they start venturing into politics – which they invariably do – then they are dangerous.

    An yet you want to ram your godlessness down our throats, banishing any mention of God, disparage religion in the most vile of ways, using laughable loons as support, though our Declaration of Independence does mention God.

    I find you one of the most duplicitous people and biggest hypocrites I’ve ever read.

  • 561. Tex Taylor  |  August 28, 2011 at 10:29 am

    Poolman answered your question for me Rutherford, though one can never tell if he meant to. Galileo was a godly man until the day he died and even said as much in his written record.

    I do hope Huck was making mention of King Solomon and King David so I can prove my point.

    It makes one wonder, what exactly are they teaching in these comparative religious classes if their so functionally illiterate about the subjects they are supposedly comparing?

  • 562. Tex Taylor  |  August 28, 2011 at 10:32 am

    History shows that mixing politics with religion is always a lethal combination and when that happens it becomes MY problem.

    Is that why Congress opens with a prayer?

    And they have a fight on their hands.

    Owwwwwwwhhhhh….now you’ve got us frightened. Completely insignificant demographic. Like Dominionists. :roll:

    Shoot their/ they are

  • 563. poolman  |  August 28, 2011 at 12:06 pm

    Pfesser,

    I have met some atheists that are “hateful” of religion. There have been a few I have tried to engage in conversation that basically scoffed me when they found I actually believe in a superior being, “someone” well above human power and intellect that also chooses to be “invisible” to a great multitude of “his creation”.

    Those same atheists (at least 2 of them) admit to believing in wind, and went on to explain how that was not a “good analogy”, whereas I think it is. We see the affect of wind on other things, but never the wind itself, yet who would deny it?

    Most exhibit intense “faith” in science, some of which is “provable” and some otherwise (theory).

    Many I have tried having “conversation” with seem more close-minded than some fundamentalist “Christians” I have attempted debate. They wouldn’t even “consider” a view based on anything that aligned with “any” written scripture.

    I can’t paint any group with a broad brush, though. People are still unique, regardless of their ideology. Did you happen to watch any of the Hitchens brothers’ debates between Christopher and Peter? They were interesting. Still, there is not complete agreement among either camp regarding their differing theologies.

    I still contend that since we are all unique, our relationships to everything else is also. “One size fits all” is a misnomer.

  • 564. PFesser  |  August 28, 2011 at 12:11 pm

    Leah Burton’s book on Dominionism set for release!

    Just copied this off Immoralminority blog:

    http://theimmoralminority.blogspot.com/2011/08/leah-burton-of-gods-own-party-announces.html

    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

    God, Guns & Greed

    Forward by Dr. Anthea Butler, Graduate Chair Religious Studies, University of Pennsylvania

    Author Leah L. Burton

    A Dangerous Path for America

    God, Guns & Greed is an irreverent look into the rise of religious extremism tying Perry, Bachmann Palin &; Co. as not simply a handful of devout Christians. They are political Dominionists and their message is being preached from pulpits across America, reaching an enormous voting bloc of “social conservatives”.

    Complete description on Gryphen’s blog.

  • 565. PFesser  |  August 28, 2011 at 12:27 pm

    poolman –

    I dont’ think the wind IS a good example, because it is *testable* and *refutable*. Faith is not. Not at all. The two are really good examples of things that lie in different realms and cannot be compared. As I have said many times, as an electrical engineer I have never seen – nor will I ever see – an electron, but I can craft experiments that one hundred times out of a hundred will work exactly the same way. You may say that the presence of the earth itself is proof of a creator but there is no way to test that and possibly refute it, so it is not science.

    Also, “theory” in science does not mean “a guess or conjecture.” It means the explanation of how things actually work, like “electron theory” or “theory of operation” of a gasoline engine, for example. So in that light, evolution is a theory. It is also a fact. It can be tested, refuted, refined. If new discoveries bolster its case, then it becomes stronger. If not, then the search for other “theories” begins. That is the beauty of science: it does not start with the answer and then work backward to make up a good story that fits the facts.

    Faith by definition cannot be tested or refuted. That is in one way its beauty. But faith is concerned with one’s soul and should not be involved in his governance. Just my opinion.

  • 566. Tex Taylor  |  August 28, 2011 at 12:56 pm

    Faith by definition cannot be tested or refuted.

    Quite the contrary. That’s the biggest fallacy you continuously and wrongly use around here and elsewhere.

    As a “scientist” cough, you continually want to treat faith as an electron. Bad analogy – poor procedure – wrong method.

    You don’t measure faith with science. You measure faith by the evidence – it is a court of law one uses to measure; not the science lab. Use the evidentiary method….just as I do the case for Christ, the accuracy of the Bible, and the realness of faith. The evidence is overwhelming that faith is real, easily measurable for both good and evil, and if pure, overwhelmingly beneficial.

    Our forefathers, even Jefferson, understood that – something you do not.

  • 567. poolman  |  August 28, 2011 at 1:03 pm

    I was comparing God to the wind, not faith to the wind. If you close your eyes, you have faith to believe the walls surrounding you still exist, even though you do not see them with your eyes closed.

    You can “test” and “refute” the affects of wind, but not the actual wind itself.

    Real science does not refute God’s existence and real science does not limit itself to what has come before.

    Today’s science does much to affirm preconceived theories and ideas and does dismiss the unexplained. Unfortunately, many who fund science today want a certain result and that taints the “science” in much the way any dogma confines discovery.

    As a medical doctor, you likely discount the effectiveness of homeopathy. Yet real science is beginning to understand the validity of it.

    http://www.i-sis.org.uk/Quantum_Coherent_Water_Life.php

    I have yet to see any of the big pharma scientific studies follow suit. Could profit affect “science”?

  • 568. Tex Taylor  |  August 28, 2011 at 1:07 pm

    Acknowledging that the term is an umbrella term, but a necessary one, Leah Burton defines Dominionism, “Defined in its simplest form, Christian Dominionism is a political approach to Christian faith based on a literal interpretation of Genesis Chapter 1 verses 26 – 28 of the Christian Bible. Believers perceive themselves as the “chosen” or the “elect”, commanded by God to “subdue” the earth and “have dominion” over all living creatures. The goal of Christian Dominionism in the United States is to abolish Separation of Church and State, establishing it as a distinctively Christian Nation based upon Old Testament Mosaic Law.”

    Genesis 1:26-28
    26 Then God said, “Let us make mankind in our image, in our likeness, so that they may rule over the fish in the sea and the birds in the sky, over the livestock and all the wild animals,[a] and over all the creatures that move along the ground.”

    27 So God created mankind in his own image,
    in the image of God he created them;
    male and female he created them.

    28 God blessed them and said to them, “Be fruitful and increase in number; fill the earth and subdue it. Rule over the fish in the sea and the birds in the sky and over every living creature that moves on the ground.”

    See the threat? See the correlation, cause and effect? Are you frightened; threaten? Unless you are reading this board and not human, it would appear to me you have little to fear from these ‘Dominionists’.

    So if their first observation is wrong, why shouldn’t I discount everything else about Leah Burton? Another apostate and Christian hating fermented Kool Aid drinker. ** YAWN **

    Here’s a prediction. This will be another in a long line of ho hums quickly forgotten, and in fact, won’t even rise past the lunatic fringe.

  • 569. poolman  |  August 28, 2011 at 1:23 pm

    Pfesser,

    There is a “war” on real science in many of the universities. I remember reading this some time ago and since have seen how many of these same practices are being exhibited across America today.

    http://www.themudflats.net/2009/12/29/voices-from-the-flats-alaskas-war-on-science/

    With the recent revelation that the University of Alaska no longer protects the freedom of its faculty to honestly convey their scientific perspective to the public without fear of reprisal, particularly if their perspective is critical of industry or government, this war on science comes into sharp focus. Have we entered the Dark Ages of science and reason in Alaska?

  • 570. PFesser  |  August 28, 2011 at 2:22 pm

    I am actually pretty aware of the war on science – especially as waged by GWB. I don’t have any references on it right at hand, but one that comes to mind was the “abstinence-only” education of high-school kids. All the data shows conclusively that approach is about as effective in preventing teen pregnancy as rattling chicken bones by the front door, but the Bushies continued to pressure schools to present that as the ONLY form of birth control. Ditto the “intelligent” design nonsense.

    Along those lines, Bill Keller of the NYT has formulated a series of questions for the presidential candidates I think his reasoning and his questions themselves are pretty good”

    “Look at Rick Perry for example. The man has said numerous times that he would leave the more difficult problems facing his state, and our country, “in God’s hands.” Is that really the guy we want to have at the helm tasked with steering this great country through the troubles which lie just over the horizon?

    Here are the questions that Keller sent to the candidates:

    1. Is it fair to question presidential candidates about details of their faith?
    2. Is it fair to question candidates about controversial remarks made by their pastors, mentors, close associates or thinkers whose books they recommend?
    3. (a) Do you agree with those religious leaders who say that America is a “Christian nation” or “Judeo-Christian nation?” (b) What does that mean in practice?
    4. If you encounter a conflict between your faith and the Constitution and laws of the United States, how would you resolve it? Has that happened, in your experience?
    5. (a) Would you have any hesitation about appointing a Muslim to the federal bench? (b) What about an atheist?
    6. Are Mormons Christians, in your view? Should the fact that Mitt Romney and Jon Huntsman are Mormons influence how we think of them as candidates?
    7. What do you think of the evangelical Christian movement known as Dominionism and the idea that Christians, and only Christians, should hold dominion over the secular institutions of the earth?
    8. (a) What is your attitude toward the theory of evolution? (b) Do you believe it should be taught in public schools?
    9. Do you believe it is proper for teachers to lead students in prayer in public schools?”

    Yes. If the candidates are going to insist on wearing their “faith” on their sleeves, I want to know just how much their decisions as public officials are going to be informed by common sense and reason and how much by their “faith.”

  • 571. El Tigre  |  August 28, 2011 at 3:14 pm

    “3. (a) Do you agree with those religious leaders who say that America is a “Christian nation” or “Judeo-Christian nation?” (b) What does that mean in practice?”

    The real question is, “what does “Christine nation” mean in the context of [your] question?”

    Why? Because, PF, when you say “I want to know just how much their decisions as public officials are going to be informed by common sense and reason and how much by their ‘faith” you are a moving target. Virtually all of your references to politicians speaking of religion, faith or divine power, ends in “dominionism,” “theocracy” or some species of delusional/unfit to lead.

    So, while couched as a self-limiting exercise (i.e. “what does that mean in practice [to you]?”), it is the exact opposite. If I am mistaken, please tell me how that question could be answered to your satisfaction without leading to your usual conclusion?

    While you strangely deny your hatred of religion generally (Chrisitianity in particular), go ahead. Play devils advocate.

    How can that question be answered to your satisfaction without leading to your usual conclusion?

  • 572. Tex Taylor  |  August 28, 2011 at 4:17 pm

    Tigre,

    Have you seen who Pfesser has hitched his wagon to with this lib whore Leah Burton? A complete kook, freedom from religion type. I was reading a little bit about her.

    Look at her foreword associates. Known liar and a progeny to a skunk so vile, even the Clinton’s disowned him.

    http://www.politicususa.com/en/what-is-dominionism-god-guns-greed

    Max Blumenthal, Sidney Blumenthal’s son? Joe Wilson of the Valerie Plame fiasco? Do you know how easy this shit is going to be to discount, if it even makes a national blip?

    Paranoid schizophrenics and hate mongers – very liberal RINO’s at best. Are they not aware their days are long over? They’re closer to extinction than progressivism.

    Buwahahahaha…

  • 573. Tex Taylor  |  August 28, 2011 at 4:45 pm

    Even the skinheads hate Leah Burton. :twisted: And after she reported her “stomping”, the cops pretty much dismissed her too. Sorry Pfesser – you so far out in left-field, it’s not even worth debating about. Join Poolmold in the rubber room.

    http://crooksandliars.com/susie-madrak/leah-burton-says-2008-she-was-stomped

    She’s a fricking nut but that heel mark looks good on cheekbones.

  • 574. Tex Taylor  |  August 28, 2011 at 5:10 pm

    Leah Burton does an amazing job of tying the Oslo terrorist to Christian Dominionism.

    Sarah Palin was involved in the Oslo mass murder too! This is great stuff… :lol: Is Rick Perry a mass murderer? Only the Shadow knows…

    http://theimmoralminority.blogspot.com/2011/07/leah-burton-does-amazing-job-of-tying.html

  • 575. Alfie  |  August 28, 2011 at 6:02 pm

    Rutherford:Get a new thread for crying out loud,even just an open thread.
    PF: I don’t think most atheists *hate* religion. Those that I know find it silly and irrational and they are genuinely baffled by it, but they certainly don’t hate it.
    I actually find that most of the “professional” atheists do indeed hate faith/religion. That is a point that is pretty ironic since those same folks turn atheism into a religion of its own.
    Poolman: not for nothing I don’t assume any of us to be fully known through threads,perhaps that is what causes some of the high powered shots. I am a veteran,my gravatar is of the light brigade ala the Valley of Death. There is a very deep reasoning behind that,my blogs name etc.

  • 576. poolman  |  August 28, 2011 at 6:05 pm

    http://www.reclaim7mountains.com/

    In 1975, Bill Bright, founder of Campus Crusade, and Loren Cunningham, founder of Youth With a Mission, had lunch together in Colorado. God simultaneously gave each of these change agents a message to give to the other. During that same time frame Francis Schaeffer was given a similar message. That message was that if we are to impact any nation for Jesus Christ, then we would have to affect the seven spheres, or mountains of society that are the pillars of any society. These seven mountains are business, government, media, arts and entertainment, education, the family and religion. There are many subgroups under these main categories. About a month later the Lord showed Francis Schaeffer the same thing. In essence, God was telling these three change agents where the battlefield was. It was here where culture would be won or lost. Their assignment was to raise up change agents to scale the mountains and to help a new generation of change agents understand the larger story.

    Then in complete doublespeak, the next paragraph contradicts said stated purpose with the standard PC “Christian” talking points, recognized by all that claim to share the “faith”.

    The 7 mountains initiative is not an initiative to establish dominion over all the earth or in governments. It is not an initiative that does not love and serve all people on the earth or seeks to alleviate other faith expressions. As followers of Christ, we believe we are called to love all people, regardless of faith, lifestyle or gender orientation. God loves all people. He provides guidelines for living as found in the Holy Scriptures and we support those guidelines as a people called to love and obey His calling upon our lives. Jesus invites all people into this destiny, but not all will come. We are called to model what Christ taught when He prayed that what was in heaven would be manifested on earth through a people known for their love of one another and others. That means His love and grace would be extended to all people.

    In summary, we believe that influence is a result of our love, humility and obedience to God, not a goal to be achieved. It is the fruit of our obedience. – Os Hillman

    Talk about CYA! These “change agents” should scare more than just nonbelievers. The Holy Spirit is the only one tasked to perform “change” and the battlefield is a spiritual one, not cultural.

    The people and ideas that pass for “Christian” nowadays. :roll: Plenty of “believers” never seek the source and merely operate from the “law” or the “flesh” or tradition. Unfortunately, much of their leadership does too. And then, there’s the wolves that have infiltrated the ranks. :evil:

  • 577. Tex Taylor  |  August 28, 2011 at 6:30 pm

    You know Poolman,

    Not once when asked here, have you ever told me who you feel best epitomizes the walk of a Christian in America. Surely there is somebody of national recognition you could use as example?

    You keep calling yourself a Christian, yet you’re a Planned Parenthood supporter, a conspiracy theorist aligned with some of America’s most vile religious critics, and a constant critic of anything Christian or American.

    Before me calling you a liar and Pharisee, could you answer the question for me? Is there some Christian organization of worth that I might recognize?

    For example, what exactly is your Saturday night congregation?

  • 578. Tex Taylor  |  August 28, 2011 at 7:18 pm

    I’ve had it confirmed that I am indeed a racist. :evil:

    http://dailycaller.com/2011/08/28/gore-global-warming-skeptics-are-this-generations-racists/

  • 579. poolman  |  August 28, 2011 at 7:20 pm

    Tex,

    I actually have named a few I consider genuine that you would recognize. The toughest thing is finding a perfect human. They just don’t exist. Even those that appear to be close are greatly flawed, many going to great lengths to keep up a “public” image, the very act my Lord was so critical of while walking among us.

    Pray in secret, give in secret, fast in secret. These were what true believers were tasked to do. To develop a secret relationship with God.

    If you recall, Jesus was an outcast, a bastard to society, rejected by His family, community, and the church. The final act was being nailed naked in a very public display.

    You think he would have hired a better PR manager. :lol:

    He did nothing to promote Himself, ever. He is our example to how we are to live. A life of total service.

    So to ask me for a celebrity that best illustrates “my view” of a follower of Christ seems somewhat absurd. Yet I know anyone I submit will become a potential target for abasement.

    So, since I want to address your question in an innocent light, forgetting that many of what I have provided in the past has not been examined or considered, all for various reasons, but generally boiling down to the preconceptions you have regarding me and my sources, I will offer one I think I can say operates from where we as true believers should:

    Nick Vujicic

  • 580. Rutherford  |  August 28, 2011 at 7:38 pm

    Relief at last folks …. I finally wrote a new post. No more slow loading. :-)

    You’re welcome.

  • 581. Tex Taylor  |  August 28, 2011 at 7:50 pm

    Nice inspirational story. No debasement here.

    But that doesn’t answer my question to my satisfaction. First, your church – I want to see its mission statement; second, someone or some ministry of national acclaim that any household might recognize.

    Surely there is one person you can name.

    P.S. – I doubt Nick is a supporter of PP

  • 582. poolman  |  August 28, 2011 at 8:07 pm

    My church’s mission statement is this:

    Transforming ordinary people into extraordinary followers of Christ.

    I can name several authors that I admire and have learned from. That doesn’t mean they are the “perfect” person or offer the “perfect” theology you seem to be after. Like I said, that person is nonexistent and God is not stagnant. I don’t think any of our church leaders would be recognized as a “household” name.

    And what would be the point, anyway?

    P.S. – Pure conjecture on your part. Whether Nick supports PP or not is irrelevant. Does PP even exist in Australia? :smile:

  • 583. Tex Taylor  |  August 28, 2011 at 8:13 pm

    That’s nice. I’m not looking for perfection. Surely there is somebody that has been of a profound influence with a name I might recognize.

    You’re talking in platitudes without specifics, and dodging the questions most ineffectively. What’s new?

    List an author that most would be familiar – no need for perfection.

  • 584. poolman  |  August 28, 2011 at 8:53 pm

    You’re talking in platitudes without specifics, and dodging the questions most ineffectively. What’s new?

    – Tax Tadler

    You just don’t recognize the straight skinny. I am not one to “beat around the bush”, W or otherwise, so to speak.

    The author I am reading and really digging right at the moment is Jack Deere. The book is titled Surprised by the Voice of God.

    I think it’s inspired, actually, and has helped my walk. :cool:

  • 585. poolman  |  August 28, 2011 at 9:26 pm

    Tex, Listen and decide. This is one of his latest I found:

    http://www.wellspringdfw.org/the-question-of-hell/

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Trackback this post  |  Subscribe to the comments via RSS Feed


August 2011
M T W T F S S
« Jul   Sep »
1234567
891011121314
15161718192021
22232425262728
293031  
Bookmark and Share

Categories

Rutherford on Twitter

The Rutherford Lawson Blog is a member of

WordPress Political Blogger

My Sister Site

Town Called Dobson Daily Preview
AddThis Feed Button
http://www.blog4mobile.com/

Recent BlogCatalog Readers

View My Profile View My Profile View My Profile

Archives


Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 715 other followers

%d bloggers like this: